William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008/Title II/Subtitle D

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==Subtitle D—Activities of the United States Government==

SEC. 231. ANNUAL REPORT BY THE ATTORNEY GENERAL.[edit]

Section 105(d)(7) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7103(d)(7)) is amended—

(1) in subparagraph (A)—
(A) by striking `section 107(b)' and inserting `subsections (b) and (f) of section 107'; and
(B) by inserting `the Attorney General,' after `the Secretary of Labor,';
(2) in subparagraph (G), by striking `and' at the end;
(3) by redesignating subparagraph (H) as subparagraph (J); and
(4) by inserting after subparagraph (G) the following:
`(H) activities by the Department of Defense to combat trafficking in persons, including—
`(i) educational efforts for, and disciplinary actions taken against, members of the United States Armed Forces;
`(ii) the development of materials used to train the armed forces of foreign countries; and
`(iii) efforts to ensure that United States Government contractors and their employees or United States Government subcontractors and their employees do not engage in trafficking in persons;
`(I) activities or actions by Federal departments and agencies to enforce—
`(i) section 106(g) and any similar law, regulation, or policy relating to United States Government contractors and their employees or United States Government subcontractors and their employees that engage in severe forms of trafficking in persons, the procurement of commercial sex acts, or the use of forced labor, including debt bondage;
`(ii) section 307 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1307; relating to prohibition on importation of convict-made goods), including any determinations by the Secretary of Homeland Security to waive the restrictions of such section; and
`(iii) prohibitions on the procurement by the United States Government of items or services produced by slave labor, consistent with Executive Order 13107 (December 10, 1998); and'.

SEC. 232. INVESTIGATION BY THE INSPECTORS GENERAL.[edit]

(a) In General- For each of the fiscal years 2010 through 2012, the Inspectors General of the Department of Defense, the Department of State, and the United States Agency for International Development shall investigate a sample of the contracts described in subsection (b).
(b) Contracts Described-
(1) IN GENERAL- The contracts described in subsection (a) are contracts, or subcontracts at any tier, under which there is a heightened risk that a contractor may engage, knowingly or unknowingly, in acts related to trafficking in persons, such as—
(A) confiscation of an employee's passport;
(B) restriction on an employee's mobility;
(C) abrupt or evasive repatriation of an employee;
(D) deception of an employee regarding the work destination; or
(E) acts otherwise described in section 106(g) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7104).
(2) CONSULTATION AND INFORMATION RECEIVED- In determining the type of contact that should be investigated pursuant to subsection (a), the Inspectors General shall—
(A) consult with the Director of the Office to Combat Trafficking in Persons of the Department of State; and
(B) take into account any credible information received regarding report of trafficking in persons.
(c) Congressional Notification-
(1) IN GENERAL- Not later than January 15, 2009, and annually thereafter through January 15, 2011, each Inspector General shall submit a report to the congressional committees listed in paragraph (3)—
(A) summarizing the findings of the investigations conducted in the previous year, including any findings regarding trafficking in persons or any improvements needed to prevent trafficking in persons; and
(B) in the case of any contractor or subcontractor with regard to which the Inspector General has found substantial evidence of trafficking in persons, report as to—
(i) whether or not the case has been referred for prosecution; and
(ii) whether or not the case has been treated in accordance with section 106(g) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7104) (relating to termination of certain grants, contracts and cooperative agreements).
(2) JOINT REPORT- The Inspectors General described in subsection (a) may submit their reports jointly.
(3) CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES- The committees list in this paragraph are—
(A) the Committee on Armed Services of the Senate;
(B) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate;
(C) the Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives; and
(D) the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 233. SENIOR POLICY OPERATING GROUP.[edit]

Section 206 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 14044d) is amended by striking `, as the department or agency determines appropriate,'.

SEC. 234. PREVENTING UNITED STATES TRAVEL BY TRAFFICKERS.[edit]

Section 212(a)(2)(H)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1182(a)(2)(H)(i)) is amended by striking `consular officer' and inserting `consular officer, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Secretary of State,'.

SEC. 235. ENHANCING EFFORTS TO COMBAT THE TRAFFICKING OF CHILDREN.[edit]

(a) Combating Child Trafficking at the Border and Ports of Entry of the United States-
(1) POLICIES AND PROCEDURES- In order to enhance the efforts of the United States to prevent trafficking in persons, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in conjunction with the Secretary of State, the Attorney General, and the Secretary of Health and Human Services, shall develop policies and procedures to ensure that unaccompanied alien children in the United States are safely repatriated to their country of nationality or of last habitual residence.
(2) SPECIAL RULES FOR CHILDREN FROM CONTIGUOUS COUNTRIES-
(A) DETERMINATIONS- Any unaccompanied alien child who is a national or habitual resident of a country that is contiguous with the United States shall be treated in accordance with subparagraph (B), if the Secretary of Homeland Security determines, on a case-by-case basis, that—
(i) such child has not been a victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons, and there is no credible evidence that such child is at risk of being trafficked upon return to the child's country of nationality or of last habitual residence;
(ii) such child does not have a fear of returning to the child's country of nationality or of last habitual residence owing to a credible fear of persecution; and
(iii) the child is able to make an independent decision to withdraw the child's application for admission to the United States.
(B) RETURN- An immigration officer who finds an unaccompanied alien child described in subparagraph (A) at a land border or port of entry of the United States and determines that such child is inadmissible under the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101 et seq.) may—
(i) permit such child to withdraw the child's application for admission pursuant to section 235(a)(4) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1225(a)(4)); and
(ii) return such child to the child's country of nationality or country of last habitual residence.
(C) CONTIGUOUS COUNTRY AGREEMENTS- The Secretary of State shall negotiate agreements between the United States and countries contiguous to the United States with respect to the repatriation of children. Such agreements shall be designed to protect children from severe forms of trafficking in persons, and shall, at a minimum, provide that—
(i) no child shall be returned to the child's country of nationality or of last habitual residence unless returned to appropriate employees or officials, including child welfare officials where available, of the accepting country's government;
(ii) no child shall be returned to the child's country of nationality or of last habitual residence outside of reasonable business hours; and
(iii) border personnel of the countries that are parties to such agreements are trained in the terms of such agreements.
(3) RULE FOR OTHER CHILDREN- The custody of unaccompanied alien children not described in paragraph (2)(A) who are apprehended at the border of the United States or at a United States port of entry shall be treated in accordance with subsection (b).
(4) SCREENING- Within 48 hours of the apprehension of a child who is believed to be described in paragraph (2)(A), but in any event prior to returning such child to the child's country of nationality or of last habitual residence, the child shall be screened to determine whether the child meets the criteria listed in paragraph (2)(A). If the child does not meet such criteria, or if no determination can be made within 48 hours of apprehension, the child shall immediately be transferred to the Secretary of Health and Human Services and treated in accordance with subsection (b). Nothing in this paragraph may be construed to preclude an earlier transfer of the child.
(5) ENSURING THE SAFE REPATRIATION OF CHILDREN-
(A) REPATRIATION PILOT PROGRAM- To protect children from trafficking and exploitation, the Secretary of State shall create a pilot program, in conjunction with the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Secretary of Homeland Security, nongovernmental organizations, and other national and international agencies and experts, to develop and implement best practices to ensure the safe and sustainable repatriation and reintegration of unaccompanied alien children into their country of nationality or of last habitual residence, including placement with their families, legal guardians, or other sponsoring agencies.
(B) ASSESSMENT OF COUNTRY CONDITIONS- The Secretary of Homeland Security shall consult the Department of State's Country Reports on Human Rights Practices and the Trafficking in Persons Report in assessing whether to repatriate an unaccompanied alien child to a particular country.
(C) REPORT ON REPATRIATION OF UNACCOMPANIED ALIEN CHILDREN- Not later than 18 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Health and Human Services, with assistance from the Secretary of Homeland Security, shall submit a report to the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives on efforts to improve repatriation programs for unaccompanied alien children. Such report shall include—
(i) the number of unaccompanied alien children ordered removed and the number of such children actually removed from the United States;
(ii) a statement of the nationalities, ages, and gender of such children;
(iii) a description of the policies and procedures used to effect the removal of such children from the United States and the steps taken to ensure that such children were safely and humanely repatriated to their country of nationality or of last habitual residence, including a description of the repatriation pilot program created pursuant to subparagraph (A);
(iv) a description of the type of immigration relief sought and denied to such children;
(v) any information gathered in assessments of country and local conditions pursuant to paragraph (2); and
(vi) statistical information and other data on unaccompanied alien children as provided for in section 462(b)(1)(J) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 279(b)(1)(J)).
(D) PLACEMENT IN REMOVAL PROCEEDINGS- Any unaccompanied alien child sought to be removed by the Department of Homeland Security, except for an unaccompanied alien child from a contiguous country subject to exceptions under subsection (a)(2), shall be—
(i) placed in removal proceedings under section 240 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1229a);
(ii) eligible for relief under section 240B of such Act (8 U.S.C. 1229c) at no cost to the child; and
(iii) provided access to counsel in accordance with subsection (c)(5).
(b) Combating Child Trafficking and Exploitation in the United States-
(1) CARE AND CUSTODY OF UNACCOMPANIED ALIEN CHILDREN- Consistent with section 462 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 279), and except as otherwise provided under subsection (a), the care and custody of all unaccompanied alien children, including responsibility for their detention, where appropriate, shall be the responsibility of the Secretary of Health and Human Services.
(2) NOTIFICATION- Each department or agency of the Federal Government shall notify the Department of Health and Human services within 48 hours upon—
(A) the apprehension or discovery of an unaccompanied alien child; or
(B) any claim or suspicion that an alien in the custody of such department or agency is under 18 years of age.
(3) TRANSFERS OF UNACCOMPANIED ALIEN CHILDREN- Except in the case of exceptional circumstances, any department or agency of the Federal Government that has an unaccompanied alien child in custody shall transfer the custody of such child to the Secretary of Health and Human Services not later than 72 hours after determining that such child is an unaccompanied alien child.
(4) AGE DETERMINATIONS- The Secretary of Health and Human Services, in consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security, shall develop procedures to make a prompt determination of the age of an alien, which shall be used by the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of Health and Human Services for children in their respective custody. At a minimum, these procedures shall take into account multiple forms of evidence, including the non-exclusive use of radiographs, to determine the age of the unaccompanied alien.
(c) Providing Safe and Secure Placements for Children-
(1) POLICIES AND PROGRAMS- The Secretary of Health and Human Services, Secretary of Homeland Security, Attorney General, and Secretary of State shall establish policies and programs to ensure that unaccompanied alien children in the United States are protected from traffickers and other persons seeking to victimize or otherwise engage such children in criminal, harmful, or exploitative activity, including policies and programs reflecting best practices in witness security programs.
(2) SAFE AND SECURE PLACEMENTS- Subject to section 462(b)(2) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 279(b)(2)), an unaccompanied alien child in the custody of the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall be promptly placed in the least restrictive setting that is in the best interest of the child. In making such placements, the Secretary may consider danger to self, danger to the community, and risk of flight. Placement of child trafficking victims may include placement in an Unaccompanied Refugee Minor program, pursuant to section 412(d) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1522(d)), if a suitable family member is not available to provide care. A child shall not be placed in a secure facility absent a determination that the child poses a danger to self or others or has been charged with having committed a criminal offense. The placement of a child in a secure facility shall be reviewed, at a minimum, on a monthly basis, in accordance with procedures prescribed by the Secretary, to determine if such placement remains warranted.
(3) SAFETY AND SUITABILITY ASSESSMENTS-
(A) IN GENERAL- Subject to the requirements of subparagraph (B), an unaccompanied alien child may not be placed with a person or entity unless the Secretary of Health and Human Services makes a determination that the proposed custodian is capable of providing for the child's physical and mental well-being. Such determination shall, at a minimum, include verification of the custodian's identity and relationship to the child, if any, as well as an independent finding that the individual has not engaged in any activity that would indicate a potential risk to the child.
(B) HOME STUDIES- Before placing the child with an individual, the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall determine whether a home study is first necessary. A home study shall be conducted for a child who is a victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons, a special needs child with a disability (as defined in section 3 of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12102(2))), a child who has been a victim of physical or sexual abuse under circumstances that indicate that the child's health or welfare has been significantly harmed or threatened, or a child whose proposed sponsor clearly presents a risk of abuse, maltreatment, exploitation, or trafficking to the child based on all available objective evidence. The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall conduct follow-up services, during the pendency of removal proceedings, on children for whom a home study was conducted and is authorized to conduct follow-up services in cases involving children with mental health or other needs who could benefit from ongoing assistance from a social welfare agency.
(C) ACCESS TO INFORMATION- Not later than 2 weeks after receiving a request from the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall provide information necessary to conduct suitability assessments from appropriate Federal, State, and local law enforcement and immigration databases.
(4) LEGAL ORIENTATION PRESENTATIONS- The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall cooperate with the Executive Office for Immigration Review to ensure that custodians receive legal orientation presentations provided through the Legal Orientation Program administered by the Executive Office for Immigration Review. At a minimum, such presentations shall address the custodian's responsibility to attempt to ensure the child's appearance at all immigration proceedings and to protect the child from mistreatment, exploitation, and trafficking.
(5) ACCESS TO COUNSEL- The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall ensure, to the greatest extent practicable and consistent with section 292 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1362), that all unaccompanied alien children who are or have been in the custody of the Secretary or the Secretary of Homeland Security, and who are not described in subsection (a)(2)(A), have counsel to represent them in legal proceedings or matters and protect them from mistreatment, exploitation, and trafficking. To the greatest extent practicable, the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall make every effort to utilize the services of pro bono counsel who agree to provide representation to such children without charge.
(6) CHILD ADVOCATES- The Secretary of Health and Human Services is authorized to appoint independent child advocates for child trafficking victims and other vulnerable unaccompanied alien children. A child advocate shall be provided access to materials necessary to effectively advocate for the best interest of the child. The child advocate shall not be compelled to testify or provide evidence in any proceeding concerning any information or opinion received from the child in the course of serving as a child advocate. The child advocate shall be presumed to be acting in good faith and be immune from civil and criminal liability for lawful conduct of duties as described in this provision.
(d) Permanent Protection for Certain At-Risk Children-
(1) IN GENERAL- Section 101(a)(27)(J) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(27)(J)) is amended—
(A) in clause (i), by striking `State and who has been deemed eligible by that court for long-term foster care due to abuse, neglect, or abandonment;' and inserting `State, or an individual or entity appointed by a State or juvenile court located in the United States, and whose reunification with 1 or both of the immigrant's parents is not viable due to abuse, neglect, abandonment, or a similar basis found under State law;'; and
(B) in clause (iii)—
(i) in the matter preceding subclause (I), by striking `the Attorney General expressly consents to the dependency order serving as a precondition to the grant of special immigrant juvenile status;' and inserting `the Secretary of Homeland Security consents to the grant of special immigrant juvenile status,'; and
(ii) in subclause (I), by striking `in the actual or constructive custody of the Attorney General unless the Attorney General specifically consents to such jurisdiction;' and inserting `in the custody of the Secretary of Health and Human Services unless the Secretary of Health and Human Services specifically consents to such jurisdiction;'.
(2) EXPEDITIOUS ADJUDICATION- All applications for special immigrant status under section 101(a)(27)(J) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(27)(J)) shall be adjudicated by the Secretary of Homeland Security not later than 180 days after the date on which the application is filed.
(3) ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS- Section 245(h)(2)(A) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1255(h)(2)(A)) is amended to read as follows:
`(A) paragraphs (4), (5)(A), (6)(A), (6)(C), (6)(D), (7)(A), and (9)(B) of section 212(a) shall not apply; and'.
(4) ELIGIBILITY FOR ASSISTANCE-
(A) IN GENERAL- A child who has been granted special immigrant status under section 101(a)(27)(J) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(27)(J)) and who was either in the custody of the Secretary of Health and Human Services at the time a dependency order was granted for such child or who was receiving services pursuant to section 501(a) of the Refugee Education Assistance Act of 1980 (8 U.S.C. 1522 note) at the time such dependency order was granted, shall be eligible for placement and services under section 412(d) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1522(d)) until the earlier of—
(i) the date on which the child reaches the age designated in section 412(d)(2)(B) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1522(d)(2)(B)); or
(ii) the date on which the child is placed in a permanent adoptive home.
(B) STATE REIMBURSEMENT- Subject to the availability of appropriations, if State foster care funds are expended on behalf of a child who is not described in subparagraph (A) and has been granted special immigrant status under section 101(a)(27)(J) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(27)(J)), the Federal Government shall reimburse the State in which the child resides for such expenditures by the State.
(5) STATE COURTS ACTING IN LOCO PARENTIS- A department or agency of a State, or an individual or entity appointed by a State court or juvenile court located in the United States, acting in loco parentis, shall not be considered a legal guardian for purposes of this section or section 462 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 279).
(6) TRANSITION RULE- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, an alien described in section 101(a)(27)(J) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(27)(J)), as amended by paragraph (1), may not be denied special immigrant status under such section after the date of the enactment of this Act based on age if the alien was a child on the date on which the alien applied for such status.
(7) ACCESS TO ASYLUM PROTECTIONS.—Section 208 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1158) is amended—
(A) in subsection (a)(2), by adding at the end the following:
‘‘(E) APPLICABILITY.—Subparagraphs (A) and (B) shall not apply to an unaccompanied alien child (as defined in section 462(g) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 279(g))).’’; and
(B) in subsection (b)(3), by adding at the end the following:
‘‘(C) INITIAL JURISDICTION.—An asylum officer (as defined in section 235(b)(1)(E)) shall have initial jurisdiction over any asylum application filed by an unaccompanied alien child (as defined in section 462(g) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 279(g))), regardless of whether filed in accordance with this section or section 235(b).’’.
(8) SPECIALIZED NEEDS OF UNACCOMPANIED ALIEN CHILDREN.—Applications for asylum and other forms of relief from removal in which an unaccompanied alien child is the principal applicant shall be governed by regulations which take into account the specialized needs of unaccompanied alien children and which address both procedural and substantive aspects of handling unaccompanied alien children’s cases.
(e) TRAINING.—The Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, and the Attorney General shall provide specialized training to all Federal personnel, and upon request, state and local personnel, who have substantive contact with unaccompanied alien children. Such personnel shall be trained to work with unaccompanied alien children, including identifying children who are victims of severe forms of trafficking in persons, and children for whom asylum or special immigrant relief may be appropriate, including children described in subsection (a)(2).
(f) AMENDMENTS TO THE HOMELAND SECURITY ACT OF 2002.—
(1) ADDITIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES.—Section 462(b)(1)(L) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 279(b)(1)(L)) is amended by striking the period at the end and inserting ‘‘, including regular follow-up visits to such facilities, placements, and other entities, to assess the continued suitability of such placements.’’.
(2) TECHNICAL CORRECTIONS.—Section 462(b) of such Act (6 U.S.C. 279(b)) is further amended—
(A) in paragraph (3), by striking ‘‘paragraph (1)(G),’’ and inserting ‘‘paragraph (1),’’; and
(B) by adding at the end the following:
‘‘(4) RULE OF CONSTRUCTION.—Nothing in paragraph (2)(B) may be construed to require that a bond be posted for an unaccompanied alien child who is released to a qualified sponsor.’’.
(g) DEFINITION OF UNACCOMPANIED ALIEN CHILD.—For purposes of this section, the term ‘‘unaccompanied alien child’’ has the meaning given such term in section 462(g) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 279(g)).
(h) EFFECTIVE DATE.—This section—
(1) shall take effect on the date that is 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act; and
(2) shall also apply to all aliens in the United States in pending proceedings before the Department of Homeland Security or the Executive Office for Immigration Review, or related administrative or Federal appeals, on the date of the enactment of this Act.
(i) GRANTS AND CONTRACTS.—The Secretary of Health and Human Services may award grants to, and enter into contracts with, voluntary agencies to carry out this section and section 462 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 279).

SEC. 236. RESTRICTION OF PASSPORTS FOR SEX TOURISM.[edit]

(a) In General- Following any conviction of an individual for a violation of section 2423 of title 18, United States Code, the Attorney General shall notify in a timely manner—
(1) the Secretary of State for appropriate action under subsection (b); and
(2) the Secretary of Homeland Security for appropriate action under the Immigration and Nationality Act.
(b) Authority To Restrict Passport-
(1) INELIGIBILITY FOR PASSPORT-
(A) IN GENERAL- The Secretary of State shall not issue a passport or passport card to an individual who is convicted of a violation of section 2423 of title 18, United States Code, during the covered period if the individual used a passport or passport card or otherwise crossed an international border in committing the offense.
(B) PASSPORT REVOCATION- The Secretary of State shall revoke a passport or passport card previously issued to an individual described in subparagraph (A).
(2) EXCEPTIONS-
(A) EMERGENCY AND HUMANITARIAN SITUATIONS- Notwithstanding paragraph (1), the Secretary of State may issue a passport or passport card, in emergency circumstances or for humanitarian reasons, to an individual described in paragraph (1)(A).
(B) LIMITATION FOR RETURN TO UNITED STATES- Notwithstanding paragraph (1), the Secretary of State may, prior to revocation, limit a previously issued passport or passport card only for return travel to the United States, or may issue a limited passport or passport card that only permits return travel to the United States.
(3) DEFINITIONS- In this subsection—
(A) the term `covered period' means the period beginning on the date on which an individual is convicted of a violation of section 2423 of title 18, United States Code, and ending on the later of—
(i) the date on which the individual is released from a sentence of imprisonment relating to the offense; and
(ii) the end of a period of parole or other supervised release of the covered individual relating to the offense; and
(B) the term `imprisonment' means being confined in or otherwise restricted to a jail, prison, half-way house, treatment facility, or another institution, on a full or part-time basis, pursuant to the sentence imposed as the result of a criminal conviction.

SEC. 237. ADDITIONAL REPORTING ON CRIME.[edit]

(a) Trafficking Offense Classification- The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation shall—
(1) classify the offense of human trafficking as a Part I crime in the Uniform Crime Reports;
(2) to the extent feasible, establish subcategories for State sex crimes that involve—
(A) a person who is younger than 18 years of age;
(B) the use of force, fraud or coercion; or
(C) neither of the elements described in subparagraphs (A) and (B); and
(3) classify the offense of human trafficking as a Group A offense for purpose of the National Incident-Based Reporting System.
(b) Additional Information- The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation shall revise the Uniform Crime Reporting System and the National Incident-Based Reporting System to distinguish between reports of—
(1) incidents of assisting or promoting prostitution, which shall include crimes committed by persons who—
(A) do not directly engage in commercial sex acts; and
(B) direct, manage, or profit from such acts, such as State pimping and pandering crimes;
(2) incidents of purchasing prostitution, which shall include crimes committed by persons who purchase or attempt to purchase or trade anything of value for commercial sex acts; and
(3) incidents of prostitution, which shall include crimes committed by persons providing or attempting to provide commercial sex acts.
(c) Reports and Studies-
(1) REPORTS- Not later than February 1, 2010, the Attorney General shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate reports on the following:
(A) Activities or actions, in fiscal years 2001 through 2009, by Federal departments and agencies to enforce the offenses set forth in chapter 117 of title 18, United States Code, including information regarding the number of prosecutions, the number of convictions, an identification of multiple-defendant cases and the results thereof, and, for fiscal years 2008 and 2009, the number of prosecutions, the number of convictions, and an identification of multiple-defendant case and the results thereof, the use of expanded statutes of limitation and other tools to prosecute crimes against children who reached the age of eighteen years since the time the crime was committed.
(B) The interaction, in Federal human trafficking prosecutions in fiscal years 2001 through 2010, of Federal restitution provisions with those provisions of law allowing restoration and remission of criminally and civilly forfeited property, including the distribution of proceeds among multiple victims.
(C) Activities or actions, in fiscal years 2001 through 2010, to enforce the offenses set forth in chapters 95 and 96 of title 18, United States Code, in cases involving human trafficking, sex trafficking, or prostitution offenses.
(D) Activities or actions, in fiscal years 2008 and 2009, by Federal departments and agencies to enforce the offenses set forth in the Act of August 15, 1935 (49 Stat. 651; D.C. Code 22-2701 et seq.) (relating to prostitution and pandering), including information regarding the number of prosecutions, the number of convictions, and an identification of multiple-defendant cases and the results thereof.
(2) STUDIES- Subject to availability of appropriations, the head of the National Institute of Justice shall conduct—
(A) a comprehensive study to examine the use of Internet-based businesses and services by criminal actors in the sex industry, and to disseminate best practices for investigation and prosecution of trafficking and prostitution offenses involving the Internet; and
(B) a comprehensive study to examine the application of State human trafficking statutes, including such statutes based on the model law developed by the Department of Justice, cases prosecuted thereunder, and the impact, if any, on enforcement of other State criminal statutes.
(3) STUDIES PREVIOUSLY REQUIRED BY LAW- Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Attorney General shall report to the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate on the status of the studies required by paragraph (B)(i) and (ii) of section 201(a)(1) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 14044(a)(1)) and indicate the projected date when such studies will be completed.

SEC. 238. PROCESSING OF CERTAIN VISAS.[edit]

(a) Report- Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate a report on the operations of the specially trained Violence Against Women Act Unit at the Citizenship and Immigration Service's Vermont Service Center.
(b) Elements- The report required by subsection (a) shall include the following elements:
(1) Detailed information about the funds expended to support the work of the Violence Against Women Act Unit at the Vermont Service Center.
(2) A description of training for adjudicators, victim witness liaison officers, managers, and others working in the Violence Against Women Act Unit, including general training and training on confidentiality issues.
(3) Measures taken to ensure the retention of specially trained staff within the Violence Against Women Act Unit.
(4) Measures taken to ensure the creation and retention of a core of supervisory staff within the Violence Against Women Act Unit and the Vermont Service Center with responsibility over resource allocation, policy, program development, training and other substantive or operational issues affecting the Unit, who have historical knowledge and experience with the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, the Violence Against Women Act of 1994, Violence Against Women Act of 1994 confidentiality, and the specialized policies and procedures of the Department of Homeland Security and its predecessor agencies in such cases.
(5) Measures taken to ensure routine consultation between the Violence Against Women Act Unit, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Headquarters, and the Office of Policy and Strategy during the development of any Department of Homeland Security regulations or policies that impact Violence Against Women Act of 1994 confidentiality-protected victims and their derivative family members.
(6) Information on any circumstances in which victim-based immigration applications have been adjudicated by entities other than the Violence Against Women Act Unit at the Vermont Service Center, including reasons for such action and what steps, if any, were taken to ensure that such applications were handled by trained personnel and what steps were taken to comply with the confidentiality provisions of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994.
(7) Information on the time in which it takes to adjudicate victim-based immigration applications, including the issuance of visas, work authorization and deferred action in a timely manner consistent with the safe and competent processing of such applications, and steps taken to improve in this area.

SEC. 239. TEMPORARY INCREASE IN FEE FOR CERTAIN CONSULAR SERVICES.[edit]

(a) Increase in Fee—
Notwithstanding any other provision of law, not later than October 1, 2009, the Secretary of State shall increase by $1 the fee or surcharge assessed under section 140(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236; 8 U.S.C. 1351 note) for processing machine-readable nonimmigrant visas and machine-readable combined border crossing identification cards and nonimmigrant visas.
(b) Deposit of Amounts—
Notwithstanding section 140(a)(2) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236; 8 U.S.C. 1351 note), the additional amount collected pursuant the fee increase under subsection (a) shall be deposited in the Treasury.
(c) Duration of Increase—
The fee increase authorized under subsection (a) shall terminate on the date that is 3 years after the first date on which such increased fee is collected.