Wynter, Andrew (DNB00)

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WYNTER, ANDREW (1819–1876), physician and author, the son of Andrew Wynter, was born at Bristol in 1819. He studied medicine in London at St. George's Hospital, and graduated M.D. at the university of St. Andrews in 1853. In December 1856 he succeeded (Sir) John Rose Cormack [q. v.] as editor of the ‘Association Medical Journal,’ which he continued to edit until the conclusion of 1860, the title being changed at the beginning of 1858 to the ‘British Medical Journal.’ In 1861 he became a member of the Royal College of Physicians of London.

Wynter devoted especial attention to the treatment of the insane, and held strong views of the importance of the absence of restraint. His views were fully expressed in ‘The Borderlands of Insanity, and other allied papers,’ which appeared in 1875 (London, 8vo). A new edition, with additions by Joseph Mortimer Granville, was published in 1877. He also wrote much on general topics; was a contributor to ‘Once a Week’ from its commencement in 1859; and furnished several essays on medical and social subjects to the ‘Edinburgh Review’ and the ‘Quarterly Review.’ He died at his residence, Chestnut Lodge, Grove Park, Chiswick, on 12 May 1876, and was buried at Brompton cemetery on 18 May.

Besides the work already mentioned he was the author of:

  1. ‘Odds and Ends from an Old Drawer,’ London and New York, 1855, 8vo.
  2. ‘Pictures of Town from my Mental Camera,’ London, 1855, 8vo.
  3. ‘Curiosities of Civilisation,’ London, 1860, 8vo.
  4. ‘Our Social Bees; or, Pictures of Town and Country Life,’ London, 8vo; 1st ser. 1861, 2nd ser. 1866.
  5. ‘Subtle Brains and Lissom Fingers,’ London, 1863, 8vo; new edition by Andrew Steinmetz, London, 1877, 8vo.
  6. ‘Curiosities of Toil,’ London, 1870, 2 vols. 8vo.
  7. ‘Peeps into the Human Hive,’ London, 1874, 2 vols. 8vo.
  8. ‘Fruit between the Leaves,’ London, 1875, 2 vols. 8vo.

[Medical Times, 20 May 1876; Allibone's Dict. of Engl. Lit.; Men of the Time, 1875; Times, 17 May 1876; Medical Register.]

E. I. C.