Author:George Granville

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
George Granville
(1666–1735)
1st Baron Lansdowne. English poet, playwright, and politician.
George Granville

Works[edit]

Collections of works[edit]

  • Three Plays (1713) (external scan), containing:
    • The She-Gallants, a Comedy.
    • Heroick-Love, a Tragedy.
    • The Jew of Venice, a Comedy.
  • Poems upon Several Occasions (4ᵗʰ edition—1726) (transcription project), containing:
    • On the Earl of Peterborough’s happy Negotiation of the Marriage between his Royal Highness and the Princess Mary d’Esté of Modena.
    • Spoken by the Author, being then but Twelve Years of Age, to her Royal Higness the Duthcess of York, at Trinity College in Cambridge.
    • To the King; In the First Year of His Majesty’s Reign.
    • To the King.
    • To the King.
    • Mr. Waller to the Author, on his foregoing Verses to the King.
    • To Mr. Waller.
    • To the immortal Memory of Mr. Waller, upon his Death.
    • On the Queen’s Picture, given in Exchange for another.
    • On the Queen.
    • Love.
    • The Progress of Beauty.
    • On my Lady Hyde, having the Small-Pox.
    • To Myra.
    • To Myra. Song.
    • To Myra. The Surrender.
    • To Myra. Song.
    • To Myra. Loving at First Sight.
    • To Myra.
    • In Praise of Myra.
    • My Lady Hyde, sitting for her Picture.
    • Written in a Garden in the North.
    • To Daphne.
    • To a very learned young Lady.
    • Thyrsis and Delia.
    • My Lady Hyde.
    • Myra Singing.
    • Myra in her Riding Habit.
    • Song to Myra.
    • Song to Myra.
    • To Myra.
    • Myra’s Parrot.
    • To Myra.
    • The Discovery. To the Countess of N——.
    • To Myra.
    • To Myra.
    • To Myra. Song.
    • To Myra. The Enchantment. In Imitation of the Pharmaceutria of Theocritus.
    • To Myra. The Vision.
    • Song. For Myra.
    • Death.
    • Sent the Author into the Country. Written by a Lady.
    • Occasion’d by the foregoing.
    • An Imitation of the Second Chorus in the Second Act of Seneca’s Thyestes.
    • Chloe.
    • On the Same.
    • On the Same.
    • Corinna.
    • On the Same.
    • Belinda.
    • Clarinda.
    • The Same.
    • Cleora.
    • Macro.
    • Phyllis Drinking.
    • Celia.
    • Flavia.
    • Love.
    • Women.
    • Fancy.
    • Liberality.
    • Written in Clarinda’s Pray’r-Book.
    • Fulvia.
    • To Celia.
    • Celia Singing.
    • To my Friend Mr. Dryden, on his Excellent Translations.
    • Upon a Hearing in the House of Lords of a Cause between her Grace the Dutchess of Grafton and the Lord Chief Justice.
    • To my Lord Lansdowne, upon the bombarding and burning the Town of Granville in Normandy.
    • To my Friend Dr. Garth, in his Sickness.
    • Song. To Myra.
    • To Flavia. Her Gardens having escap’d a Flood that had destroy’d all the Fruits of the Ground in her Neighbourhood.
    • Written in a Novel Entitled, Les Malheurs de l’ Amour.
    • Prologue to the She-Gallants.
    • Epilogue to the same. Spoken by Mrs. Bracegirdle in Men’s Cloaths.
    • Epilogue to the Jew of Venice.
    • Prologue to the British Enchanters.
    • Epilogue design’d for the same.
    • Prologue to Mr. Higgons’s excellent Tragedy call’d The Generous Conqueror.
    • Peleus and Thetis, a Masque, set to Musick.
    • Written under Mrs. Hare’s Name upon a Drinking-Glass.
    • A Latin Inscription on a Medal for Lewis XIV.
    • English’d, and apply’d to the Queen.
    • A Morning Hymn to her Grace the Dutchess of Hamilton.
    • An Essay upon Unnatural Flights in Poetry.
    • A Character of Mr. Wycherly.
    • The British Enchanters; or, No Magick like Love. A Dramatick Poem.
  • The Genuine Works in Verse and Prose, (1732) (external scan), (1736), containing:
    • Volume 1:
      • To the Earl of Peterborough, on his happy Accomplishment of the Marriage between his Royal Highness and the Princess Mary d’Esté of Modena. Written several years after in Imitation of the Style of Mr. Waller.
      • Spoken by the Author, being then not Twelve Years of Age, to Her Royal Highness the Dutchess of York, at Trinity-College in Cambridge.
      • To the King, in the First Year of his Majesty’s Reign.
      • To the King.
      • To the King.
      • To the Author, on his foregoing Verses to the King, by Mr. Edmund Waller.
      • Answer. To Mr. Waller.
      • To the Immortal Memory of Mr. Edmund Waller, upon his Death.
      • To Mira. Loving at first Sight.
      • To Mira.
      • Song. To Mira.
      • An Imitation of the Second Chorus in the Second Act of Seneca’s Thyestes.
      • A Loyal Exhortation. Written in the Year 1688.
      • Verses sent to the Author in his Retirement. Written by Mrs. Elizabeth Higgons.
      • Occasion’d by the forgoing Verses. Written in the year 1690.
      • Song.
      • Beauty and Law. A Poetical Pleading. Occasion’d by a Hearing in the House of Lords between the Dutchess of Grafton, and the Lord Chief justice.
      • Lady Hyde.
      • Lady Hyde having the Small-Pox, soon after the Recovery of Mrs. Mohun.
      • The Dutchess of ——————, unseasonably surpriz’d in the Embraces of her Lord.
      • To Flavia. Written in her Garden in the North, &c.
      • To the same. Her Gardens having escap’d a Flood that had laid all the Country round under Water.
      • To my Friend Dr. Garth. In his Sickneſs.
      • To my dear Kinsman Charles Lord Lansdowne, upon the Bombardment of the Town of Granville in Normandy, by the English Fleet.
      • Lady Hyde. Sitting at Sir Godfrey Kneller’s for her Picture.
      • Mrs. Granville of Wotton in Buckinghamshire, afterwards Lady Conway.
      • To Mrs. Afra Behn.
      • The Desertion.
      • Song.
      • In praise of Mira.
      • Song to Mira.
      • Mira singing.
      • Mira. At a Review of the Guards in Hyde-Park.
      • To Mira.
      • The Progress of Beauty.
      • To the Countess of Newbourg, insisting earnestly to be told who I meant by Mira.
      • To Mira.
      • To Mira.
      • To Mira.
      • Song to Mira.
      • To Mira.
      • Song to Mira.
      • To Mira.
      • Phyllis drinking.
      • To Mira.
      • The Enchantment. In Imitation of Theocritus.
      • The Vision.
      • Adieu L’Amour.
      • Love.
      • Meditation on Death.
      • Essay. Upon unnatural Flights in Poetry.
      • Explanatory Annotations on the foregoing Poem.
    • Epigrams and Characters, &c.:
      • Inscription for a Figure representing the God of Love.
      • Definition of Love.
      • Women.
      • The Relief.
      • Sent to Clarinda with a Novel, entitled Les, malheurs de l’ Amour.
      • Written in her Prayer-Book.
      • Son to the same.
      • On the same.
      • Her Name.
      • Cleora.
      • Cloe.
      • Mrs. Clavering, singing.
      • Song.
      • The Wild Boar’s Defence.
      • For Liberality.
      • Corinna.
      • Cloe.
      • A Receipt for Vapours.
      • On an Ill-favour’d Lord.
      • Cloe.
      • On the same.
      • Corinna.
      • Cloe perfuming herself.
      • Belinda.
      • In Promptu. Written under a Picture of the Countess of Sandwich, drawn in Man’s Habit.
      • To my Friend Mr. John Dryden, on his several excellent Translations of the ancient Poets.
      • A Morning Hymn to the Dutchess of Hamilton.
      • Drinking Song to Sleep.
      • Written under Mrs. Hare’s Name, upon a Drinking Glass.
      • Under the Dutchess of Bolton’s.
      • Under the Lady Harper’s Name.
      • Under the Lady Mary Villers’ Name.
      • Cupid disarm’d. To the Princess D’Auvergne.
      • Explication in French.
      • Bacchus disarm’d. To Mrs. Laura Dillon, now Lady Falkland.
      • Thyrsis and Delia. Song in Dialogue.
      • A Latin Inscription on a Medal for Lewis XIV. of France.
      • English’d, and apply’d to Queen Anne.
      • Urganda’s Prophecy. Spoken by way of Epilogue at the first Representation of the British Enchanters.
      • Prologue to the British Enchanters.
      • Epilogue deſigned for the same.
      • Prologue to Mr. Bevil Higgons’ excellent Tragedy, call’d, The Generous Conqueror.
      • Epilogue to the Jew of Venice.
      • Prologue to the She-Gallants; Or, Once a Lover and always a Lover.
      • Ode on the present Corruption of Mankind. Inscrib’d to the Lord Falkland.
      • To Fortune. Epigram.
      • Peleus and Thetis. A Masque, set to Musick.
      • The British Enchanters: Or, No Magick like Love. A Dramatick Poem.
    • Volume 2:
      • Heroick Love: Or, The Cruel Separation. A Tragedy.
    • Prose:
      • A Letter from the Author to his Father, just before the Revolution.
      • A Letter with a Character of Mr. Wycherly.
      • The Second Olynthian of Demosthenes. Translated in the Year 1702.
      • A Vindication of General Monk, Duke of Albemarle, from some Calumnies of Dr. Burnet, and some Mistakes of Dr. Echard, in relation to the Sale of Dunkirk, and the Portugal Match.
      • A Vindication of Sir Richard Granville, General in the West for King Charles the First, from the Misrepresentations of the Earl of Clarendon, and the reverend Mr. Archdeacon Echard.
      • A Letter to the Author of Reflexions Historical and Political, occasioned by a Treatise in Vindication of General Monk, and Sir Richard Granville.
      • Letter from the Author to his Nephew upon his entring into Holy Orders.

Works about Granville[edit]

Works about works of Granville[edit]

Works by this author published before January 1, 1924 are in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago. Translations or editions published later may be copyrighted. Posthumous works may be copyrighted based on how long they have been published in certain countries and areas.