Christianity in China, Tartary and Thibet/Volume 1

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Christianity in China, Tartary, and Thibet, Volume I
FROM THE APOSTLESHIP OF ST. THOMAS TO THE DISCOVERY OF THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.
 (1884)  by Évariste Régis Huc
Title and ToC

CHRISTIANITY

IN

CHINA, TARTARY, AND THIBET.


VOL. I.

London:
Printed by Spottiswoode & Co.
New-street Square.

CHRISTIANITY

IN

CHINA, TARTARY, AND THIBET.

BY

M. L'ABBÉ HUC,

FORMERLY MISSIONARY APOSTOLIC IN CHINA;

AUTHOR OF "THE CHINESE EMPIRE," ETC.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

FROM THE APOSTLESHIP OF ST. THOMAS TO THE
DISCOVERY OF THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.

LONDON:

LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN, LONGMANS, & ROBERTS.

1857.

CONTENTS

OF

THE FIRST VOLUME.


The Doctrine of the Redemption of Men diffused over the whole World The Preaching of the Jewish Nation. — Indian Poets. — Virgil. — The Sibyls. — Extract from the " Annals of China." — The World in Expectation of the Messiah. — Legend of the Apostleship of St. Thomas. — Proofs of the Preaching of St. Thomas in India. — Archaeological Proofs. — Medal of King Gondaphorus. — Probability of the Apostleship of St. Thomas in China.— Frequent Relations between the East and the West at the Commencement of the Christian Era. — Consequences of these Relations. — St. Pantenus and other Missionaries in the East. —Nestorian and Catholic Preachers in China
-      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -Page 1
 
Discovery of the famous Inscription of Si-gnan-Fou. — Translation of this Inscription. — State of the Chinese Empire at the Epoch of the Erection of this Monument. — Influx of Foreigners into China under the Dynasty of Thang. — Critical Study of the Inscription of Si-gnan-Fou. — Native Country of Olopen and other Missionaries to China in the seventh Century. — Syriac Characters. — Nestorian Doctrine. — Objections of Voltaire and Milne to the Authenticity of the Inscription. — Refutation of them. — The Authenticity of the Monument proved by Chinese Writers. — Ancient and modern Books. — Simple Faith of the Missionaries.— Inference
-      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -45
 
Religious Movement in the Chinese Empire. — Tolerance and Scepticism of the Chinese. — Propagation of Christianity in China. —First Metropolitans — Progress of Proselytism. — Details drawn from Arab Literature. — Curious Passage in a Book entitled "The Chain of Chronicles." — Revolution in China. — Massacre of the Christians. — Arab Writers and Marco Polo. — Missionaries sent to China in the tenth Century. — Notice of Prester John. — Letter of this curious Personage to the Emperor of Constantinople. — Letter of Pope Alexander III. to Prester John. — Conversion of a Khan and a Tribe of Keraites in the eleventh Century. — Numerous Conquests of this Mongol Tribe. — Origin of the Legend of Prester John. — Ung-Khan, the last Sovereign of the Keraites
-      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -83
 
A French Missionary in Tartary. — Tchinguiz-Khan proclaimed Sovereign of the Tartars. — Character of this famous Conqueror. — His Conquests. — His Death. — His religious Faith. — Election of his Successor. — Tartar Invasion of Georgia — of Armenia. — Gregory IX. and the Queen Rhouzoudan. — Invasion of Poland. — Saint Hyacinth. — Battle of Liegnitz. — Ravages of the Mongols in Poland and Russia. — Frederic Barbarossa. — St. Louis and Queen Blanche. — Bela IV. King of Hungary. — Adventures of the Canon of Vavadin. — Gregory IX. preaches a Crusade against the Tartars. — Gregory IX. and Frederic Barbarossa. — Religion of the Mongol Tartars. — Innocent IV. at the Council-General of Lyons. — Decree that Missionary Ambassadors shall be sent to the Tartars
-      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -119
 
Embassy of John de Piano Carpini. — Arrival at the Camp of Batou.— Letter of Pope Innocent IV. to the Tartars. — The Ambassador of the Holy See to the Golden Horde. — Election of the Grand Khan of the Tartars. — Couyouk proclaimed Emperor. — Audience of Piano Carpini. — The Ambassadors prepare to quit the Imperial Horde. — Letter of the Tartar Emperor to the Pope. —Return of Piano Carpini to Europe. — Innocent appoints him Archbishop of Antivari. — Embassy of Brother Anselm to the Camp of the Tartars in Persia. — Interview of the French Missionaries with the Tartar Officers. — Proposal to flay and impale them. — Discussion of the Supremacy of the Pope and the Khan. — Renown of French Valour among the Tartars. —Departure of the Monks Letter of the Tartar Lieutenant. — Manifesto of the Grand Khan. — St. Louis receives in Cyprus two Envoys from Iltchikadai Letter of the Tartar Prince. — Narrative of the Constable of Armenia. — St. Louis sends an Embassy to reply to Iltchikadai Its Ill-success and Return
-      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -162
 
State of Christianity among the Mongols. — Rubruk, the new Ambassador of St. Louis to Tartary. — Manners of the Tartars.— Hardships and Miseries of the Route. — Camp of Sartak. — The Monks at the Court of Batou. — They proceed to the Imperial Court of Mangou-Khan. — Incidents of the Journey. — The Grand Khan gives Audience to the Envoys of St. Louis. — Singular Mixture of Religions among the Tartars. — Aspect of Kara-Koroum. — Solemn Discussion among the Missionaries. — The Buddhists and the Mussulmans. — The French Missionaries quit the Court of the Emperor of Tartary. — Letter of Mangou-Khan to St. Louis. — Return of Rubruk to France
-      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -203
 
Institution of the Society of Brother Travellers for Jesus Christ. — Journey of King Hay ton in Tartary. — The Negotiations. — Houlagou leads his Army towards Jerusalem. — Destruction of the Order of the Assassins. — End of the Caliphate of Bagdad. — The Tartars draw near to the Christians. — Alexander III. deters Bela, King of Hungary, from forming an Alliance with the Mongols. — The Forty-nine Martyrs of Sandomir. — Houlagou and Nassir. — Houlagou and Alexander IV. — Strife between the Mongols and the Christians of Sidon. — Defeat of the Tartars in Egypt. — Kublai, the Grand Khan of the Tartars. — Change of Policy. — Death of Houlagou. — Marriage of his Son Abaga with the Daughter of Michael Palæologus. — Abaga and Clement IV. — Tartar Ambassadors at Lyons. — They go to England. — Mission of the two Vassilli. — Nicholas III. sends Missionaries and Letters to China and Tartary
-      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -243
 
Nestorian Propagandism in High Asia. — The Apostate Ahmed. — Argoun, Khan of Persia. — His Letter to Honorius IV. — Letters of Nicholas IV. to Argoun. — Queen of Touktan. — . Argoun and Philip the Fair. — News from the Mission in China. — Conversion of several Tartar Princes. — Letter of the Pope to Gazan, Son of Argoun. — His Wife and Child condemned to be burnt alive. — Attempts at Alliance between the Tartars and Christians. — Empire of Kublai. — Religions of China. — Confucius. — Lao-tze.—Buddha
-      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -291
 
Kublai-Khan favours the Christians. — He sends the Venetian Brothers Polo to the Sovereign Pontiff. — The two Venetians return to China accompanied by young Marco Polo. — Their Journey. — Residence of Marco Polo in China His Return to Venice The Narrative of Marco Polo. — His Account of Christianity in China. — The Apostleship of John of Monte Corvino. — His Letters to the Monks of his Order. — Persecutions raised against him. — Clement V. sends seven Bishops to China. — They consecrate Monte Corvino Archbishop of Pekin. — An Armenian Lady builds a Church at Han-Tcheou-Fou Letter of Andre de Perouse.—Numerous Missionaries in China.—Oderic de Friuli.— His Journey from the Indies to China with the Bones of four Martyrs His Apostleship in China — In Tartary — In Thibet.— His Return to Pisa. — Account of his Death
-      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -332
 
Christianity amongst the Tartars of Persia. — Correspondence of Khan Œuldjaitou with Philip the Fair, Edward I., and Clement V. — 2. Usbeck and the Province of Kiptchak. — Erection of the Archiepiscopal See of Soultaniye. — 3. Zeal of Pope John XXII. for the Propagation of the Faith. — Death of the Archbishop of Pekin, John de Monte Corvino. — Departure of Missionaries for China. — 4. Apostasy and Martyrdom of Stephen of Hungary. — 5. Mission of Pekin. — Progress of Christianity in China, and in the Steppes of Tartary. — Narrative of Pascal of Spain. — 6. Violent Persecution of the Christians of Tartary. — Revolution in China The Missions are desolated Tamerlane. — His religious Principles. — Christianity eclipsed in Upper Asia
-      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -      -374