Embarrassments (New York: The Macmillan Company, 1897)

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
For other versions of this work, see Embarrassments.


EMBARRASSMENTS



Macmillan Company logo 1913.svg



EMBARRASSMENTS




BY


AUTHOR OF "DAISY MILLER," "THE EUROPEANS" ETC., ETC.





New York

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

LONDON: MACMILLAN & CO., Ltd.

1897


All rights reserved



Copyright, 1896,

By THE MACMILLAN COMPANY.


Set up and electrotyped June, 1896. Reprinted December, 1896.







Norwood Press

J. S. Cushing & Co. — Berwick & Smith
Norwood Mass. U.S.A.




[end matter]


WORKS BY HENRY JAMES.


THE PRINCESS CASAMASSIMA.

12mo, $1.25.

We find no fault with Mr. Henry James's "Princess Casamassima." It is a great novel; it is his greatest, and it is incomparably the greatest novel of the year in our language. . . . From first to last we find no weakness in the book; the drama works simply and naturally; the causes and effects are logically related; the theme is made literature without ceasing to be life.—Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Editor's Study.

THE REVERBERATOR.

12mo, $1.00.

The public will be glad to find Mr. James in his best vein. One is thankful again that there is so brilliant an American author to give us entertaining sketches of life.—Boston Herald.

The stories are told with that mastery of the art of story-telling which their writer possesses in a conspicuous degree.—Literary World.

It is as a short story writer that we think Mr. James appears at his best, and in this volume he may be read in his most attractive and most artistic vein.—Boston Saturday Evening Gazette.

Mr. Henry James is at his best in "The Aspern Papers." . . . For careful finish, minute analysis, and vivid description of both the scenes and the characters, "The Aspern Papers" may take high rank among Mr. James's stories.—Guardian.

PARTIAL PORTRAITS.

12mo, $1.75.

Henry James has never appeared to better advantage as an author than in this delightful volume of critical essays. . . . No one can fail to acknowledge the exquisite charm of style which pervades the book, and the kind appreciation the author evinces of the finer and subtler qualities of the authors with whom he deals.—Boston Saturday Evening Gazette.

THE BOSTONIANS.

12mo, $1.25.

Unquestionably "The Bostonians" is not only the most brilliant and remarkable of Mr. James's novels, but it is one of the most important of recent contributions to literature.—Boston Courier.

His short stories, which are always bright and sparkling, are delightful. . . . Will bear reading again and again.—Mail and Express.


THE MACMILLAN COMPANY,

66 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK.



WORKS BY HENRY JAMES.


THE REAL THING,

AND OTHER TALES.

12mo, cloth, $1.00.

The latest volume of short stories from the pen of Henry James takes the title of the first tale, "The Real Thing," a story of artist life in London, which is not in the least exciting, but which is clever with that cleverness in which nobody excels the author. All the five stories are excellently written, and they are all marked by the same acute and refined observation, the power of analyzing human nature and human emotions which is so striking in all the work of Mr. James.—Boston Courier.

It is an artist's work through and through, and one feels that beneath its perfection of form this little masterpiece embodies its author's earnest æsthetic convictions.—Philadelphia Times.

"The Real Thing, and Other Tales," by Henry James, is the best volume of short stories that the author has given to the lovers of good fiction. It is distinguished by marked originality in its treatment of modern life, and the grace and purity of style for which Mr. James is celebrated, is a distinguished feature of this book.—Boston Saturday Evening Gazette.




Henry James's art is unique. Whether in the novel or in the short story, he is unlike any other writer of the day. The impatient reader may grow weary of his refinement of the literary art, but no one who has not leisure or patience should attempt to read James.—San Francisco Chronicle.

There is subtle finish of perfection about the literary workmanship of Mr. James's latest collection of stories "The Lesson of the Master" that has rarely been approached and certainly never has been excelled in any of his previous essays on fiction. One has only to read a page of this book to feel that the author of it has an unwavering passion for art, to realize that his sole aim is to depict a sentiment, an idea, or an emotion, with actual fidelity to what is actual and real.—Boston Beacon.

Mr. James is too great an artist ever to preach, but no modern writer has a keener or surer vision for the basic moralities of life, and this quality makes his books doubly agreeable, for with all the art of the Gaul, they possess a solidity that is undreamed of across the Channel.—The Home Journal.


THE MACMILLAN COMPANY,

66 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK.



This work was published before January 1, 1924, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.