English Folk-Carols/The Holly and the Ivy

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
For works with similar titles, see The Holly and the Ivy.


1. The holly and the ivy,
When they are both full grown,
Of all the trees that are in the wood,
The holly bears the crown.
The rising of the sun
And the running of the deer,
The playing of the merry organ,
Sweet singing in the choir.

2. The holly bears a blossom,
As white as the lily flower,
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ,
To be our sweet Saviour.
The rising, etc., etc.

3. The holly bears a berry, 5
As red as any blood,
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
For to do us sinners good.
The rising, etc., etc.

4. The holly bears a prickle,
As sharp as any thorn,
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
On Christmas day in the morn.
The rising, etc., etc.

5. The holly bears a bark,
As bitter as any gall.
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
For to redeem us all.
The rising, etc., etc.

6. The holly and the ivy
When they are both full grown.
Of all the trees that are in the wood.
The holly bears the crown.
The rising, etc., etc.

Cecil Sharp's note[edit]

No. 7. THE HOLLY AND THE IVY.
Sung by Mrs. Mary Clayton, at Chipping Campden.

I have supplemented Mrs. Clayton's words with those of another set recited to me by the late Mrs. Wyatt of East Harptree, Somerset. The only alteration that I have made is in the second stanza, substituting in place of the obviously incorrect "On Christmas day in the morn" (which Mrs. Wyatt gave me) the one given in the text which is the usual broadside rendering.

Variants of "The Holly and the Ivy " are printed in Bramley and Stainer's and Chope's collections. The words are also on a broadside by Wadsworth of Birmingham.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. Ibid. p. 62-63

This work was published before January 1, 1923, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.