Euripides (Donne)

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Volume XII of the "Ancient Classics for English Readers" series, the books of which series are useful as a preliminary acquaintance to readers that wish to read the ancient texts for the first time and also a nice interpretation of them for readers that are already acquainted with them. In this volume, the plays of Euripides are presented in an abbreviated form, with explanatory notes and interpretive commentary placed among the text.

EURIPIDES

BY

WILLIAM BODHAM DONNE

WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS

EDINBURGH AND LONDON

MDCCCLXXII

CONTENTS.


PAGE
CHAP. I. ATHENS IN THE DAYS OF EURIPIDES, 1
II. LIFE OF EURIPIDES, 25
III. THE SCENIC PHILOSOPHER, 51
IV. ALCESTIS.—MEDEA, 76
V. THE TWO IPHIGENIAS, 100
VI. THE BACCHANALS, 122
VII. ION.—HIPPOLYTUS, 138
VIII. THE PHŒNICIAN WOMAN.—THE SUPPLIANTS.—THE CHILDREN OF HERCULES.—THE PHRENZY OF HERCULES, 158
IX. THE TALE OF TROY: HECUBA.—THE TROJAN WOMEN, 172
X. THE CYCLOPS, 189

ADVERTISEMENT.


The writer desires to express his acknowledgments to Mr Robert Browning, for his kind permission to make use of his 'Balaustion' in the account given of "Alcestis;" to Mrs Augusta Webster, for a similar favour in the case of the "Medea;" and to Mr Maurice Purcell Fitzgerald, in that of the "Hippolytus." The translations which they have respectively allowed him to use are recorded in footnotes, as well as those which are taken from the versions of Greek tragic poets by the late Deans Milman and Alford. Where the translated passages are not attributed to an author, they are taken from Potter, in the absence of better renderings. He wishes also to commemorate his obligations to Mr F. A. Paley for the frequent and valuable assistance afforded by his Prefaces and Notes to the Plays of Euripides. It may be hoped that, with his edition of the Athenian poet, a new epoch begins for the estimation of him by classical as well as English readers. Mr Paley evidently regards Euripides in a very similar light to that taken of him by Ben Jonson—that "he is sometimes peccant, as he is most times perfect."


This work was published before January 1, 1926, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.