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Index:The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu

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The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu

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  • A Child's Garden of Verses 1
  • Underwoods 83
    • Book I (In English) 109
    • Book II (In Scots) 151
    • Book III (Songs of Travel and Other Verses) 193
  • Ballads 243
  • New Poems 351

CONTENTS
A CHILD'S GARDEN OF VERSES

PAGE
I. Bed in Summer 17
In winter I get up at night
II. A Thought 17
It is very nice to think
III. At the Sea-side 18
When I was down beside the sea
IV. Young Night Thought 18
All night long, and every night
V. Whole Duty of Children 19
A child should always say what's true
VI. Rain 19
The rain is raining all around
VII. Pirate Story 19
Three of us afloat in the meadow by the swing
VIII. Foreign Lands 20
Up into the cherry-tree
IX. Windy Nights 21
Whenever the moon and stars are set
X. Travel 21
I should like to rise and go
XI. Singing 23
Of speckled eggs the birdie sings
XII. Looking Forward 23
When I am grown to man's estate
XIII. A Good Play 24
We built a ship upon the stairs
XIV. Where go the Boats? 24
Dark brown is the river
XV. Auntie's Skirts 25
Whenever Auntie moves around
XVI. The Land of Counterpane 25
When I was sick and lay a-bed
XVII. The Land of Nod 26
From breakfast on through all the day
XVIII. My Shadow 27
I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me
XIX. System 28
Every night my prayers I say
XX. A Good Boy 28
I woke before the morning, I was happy all the day
XXI. Escape at Bedtime 29
The lights from the parlour and kitchen shone out
XXII. Marching Song 30
Bring the comb and play upon it!
XXIII. The Cow 31
The friendly cow, all red and white
XXIV. Happy Thought 31
The world is so full of a number of things
XXV. The Wind 32
I saw you toss the kites on high
XXVI. Keepsake Mill 32
Over the borders, a sin without pardon
XXVII. Good and Bad Children 33
Children, you are very little
XXVIII. Foreign Children 34
Little Indian, Sioux or Crow
XXIX. The Sun's Travels 35
The sun is not a-bed when I
XXX. The Lamplighter 36
My tea is nearly ready and the sun has left the sky
XXXI. My Bed is a Boat 37
My bed is like a little boat
XXXII. The Moon 37
The moon has a face like the clock in the hall
XXXIII. The Swing 38
How do you like to go up in a swing
XXXIV. Time to Rise 39
A birdie with a yellow bill
XXXV. Looking-glass River 39
Smooth it slides upon its travel
XXXVI. Fairy Bread 40
Come up here, O dusty feet
XXXVII. From a Railway Carriage 40
Faster than fairies, faster than witches
XXXVIII. Winter-Time 41
Late lies the wintry sun a-bed
XXXIX. The Hayloft 42
Through all the pleasant meadow-side
XL. Farewell to the Farm 43
The coach is at the door at last
XLI. North-west Passage 43
1. Good Night
When the bright lamp is carried in
2. Shadow March
All round the house is the jet-black night
3. In Port
Last, to the chamber where I lie
THE CHILD ALONE
I. The Unseen Playmate 49
When children are playing alone on the green
II. My Ship and I 50
O, it's I that am the captain of a tidy little ship
III. My Kingdom 51
Down by a shining water well
IV. Picture-books in Winter 52
Summer fading, winter comes—
V. My Treasures 53
These nuts, that I keep in the back of the nest
VI. Block City 54
What are you able to build with your blocks
VII. The Land of Story-Books 55
At evening when the lamp is lit
VIII. Armies in the Fire 56
The lamps now glitter down the street
IX. The Little Land 57
When at home alone I sit
GARDEN DAYS
I. Night and Day 63
When the golden day is done
II. Nest Eggs 65
Birds all the sunny day
III. The Flowers 66
All the names I know from nurse
IV. Summer Sun 67
Great is the sun, and wide he goes
V. The Dumb Soldier 68
When the grass was closely mown
VI. Autumn Fires 69
In the other gardens
VII. The Gardener 70
The gardener does not love to talk
VIII. Historical Associations 71
Dear Uncle Jim, this garden ground
ENVOYS
I. To Willie and Henrietta 75
If two may read aright
II. To my Mother 76
You, too, my mother, read my rhymes
III. To Auntie 76
Chief of our aunts—not only I
IV. To Minnie 76
The red room with the giant bed
V. To my Name-child 79
Some day soon this rhyming volume
VI. To Any Reader 80
Whether upon the garden seat


CONTENTS
BOOK I
IN ENGLISH

PAGE
I. Envoy 111
Go, little book, and wish to all
II. A Song of the Road 111
The gauger walked with willing foot
III. The Canoe Speaks 112
On the great streams the ships may go
IV. 114
It is the season now to go
V. The House Beautiful 115
A naked house, a naked moor
VI. A Visit from the Sea 116
Far from the loud sea beaches
VII. To a Gardener 117
Friend, in my mountain-side demesne
VIII. To Minnie 118
A picture-frame for you to fill
IX. To K. de M. 119
A lover of the moorland bare
X. To N. V. DE G. S. 120
The unfathomable sea, and time, and tears
XI. To Will H. Low 121
Youth now flees on feathered foot
XII. To Mrs. Will H. Low 122
Even in the bluest noonday of July
XIII. To H. F. Brown 123
I sit and wait a pair of oars
XIV. To Andrew Lang 124
Dear Andrew, with the brindled hair
XV. Et Tu in Arcadia Vixisti 125
In ancient tales, O friend, thy spirit dwelt
XVI. To W. E. Henley 128
The year runs through her phases; rain and sun
XVII. Henry James 129
Who comes to-night? We ope the doors in vain
XVIII. The Mirror Speaks 130
Where the bells peal far at sea
XIX. Katharine 131
We see you as we see a face
XX. To F. J. S. 131
I read, dear friend, in your dear face
XXI. Requiem 132
Under the wide and starry sky
XXII. The Celestial Surgeon 132
If I have faltered more or less
XXIII. Our Lady of the Snows 133
Out of the sun, out of the blast
XXIV. 136
Not yet, my soul, these friendly fields desert
XXV. 137
It is not yours, O mother, to complain
XXVI. The Sick Child 139
O mother, lay your hand on my brow
XXVII. In Memoriam F. A. S. 140
Yet, O stricken heart, remember, O remember
XXVIII. To my Father 141
Peace and her huge invasion to these shores
XXIX. In the States 142
With half a heart I wander here
XXX. A Portrait 143
I am a kind of farthing dip
XXXI. 144
Sing clearlier, Muse, or evermore be still
XXXII. A Camp 144
The bed was made, the room was fit
XXXIII. The Country of the Camisards 144
We travelled in the print of olden wars
XXXIV. Skerryvore 145
For love of lovely words, and for the sake
XXXV. Skerryvore: the Parallel 145
Here all is sunny, and when the truant gull
XXXVI. 146
My house, I say. But hark to the sunny doves
XXXVII. 146
My body which my dungeon is
XXXVIII. 147
Say not of me that weakly I declined
XXXIX. Dedicatory Poem 148
BOOK II
IN SCOTS
I. The Maker to Posterity 155
Far 'yont amang the years to be
II. Ille Terrarum 157
Frae nirly, nippin', Eas'lan' breeze
III. 160
When aince Aprile has fairly come
IV. A Mile an' a Bittock 161
A mile an' a bittock, a mile or twa
V. A Lowden Sabbath Morn 162
The clinkum-clank o' Sabbath bells
VI. The Spaewife 167
O, I wad like to ken—to the beggar-wife says I—
VII. The Blast—1875 169
It's rainin'. Weet's the gairden sod
VIII. The Counterblast—1886 170
My bonny man, the warld, it's true
IX. The Counterblast Ironical 173
It's strange that God should fash to frame

X. Their Laureate to an Academy Class Dinner Club 174 Dear Thamson class, whaure'er I gang XI. Embro Hie Kirk 177 The Lord Himsel' in former days XII. The Scotsman's Return from Abroad 179 In mony a foreign pairt I've been XIII. 183 Late in the night in bed I lay XIV. My Conscience! 186 Of a' the ills that flesh can fear XV. To Doctor John Brown 188 By Lyne and Tyne, by Thames and Tees XVI. 190 It's an owercome sooth for age an' youth BOOK III SONGS OF TRAVEL AND OTHER VERSES PAGE I. The Vagabond 195 Give to me the life I love II. Youth and Love—i 196 Once only by the garden gate III. Youth and Love—ii 197 To the heart of youth the world is a highwayside IV. The Unforgotten—i 198 In dreams, unhappy, I behold you stand V. The Unforgotten—ii 198 She rested by the Broken Brook VI. 199 The infinite shining heavens VII. 199 Plain as the glistering planets shine VIII. 200 To you, let snow and roses

IX. 201
Let beauty awake in the morn from beautiful dreams
X. 202
I know not how it is with you
XI. 202
I will make you brooches and toys for your delight
XII. We have Loved of Yore 203
Berried brake and reedy island
XIII. Ditty 204
The cock shall crow
XIV. Mater Triumphans 205
Son of my woman's body, you go, to the drum and fife
XV. 206
Bright is the ring of words
XVI. 206
In the highlands, in the country places
XVII. 207
Home no more home to me, whither must I wander
XVIII. To Dr. Hake 209
In the belovèd hour that ushers day
XIX. To —— 209
I knew thee strong and quiet like the hills

XX. 211 The morning drum-call on my eager ear XXI. 211 I have trod the upward and the downward slope XXII. 211 He hears with gladdened heart the thunder XXIII. The Lost Occasion 212 Farewell, fair day and fading light XXIV. If This Were Faith 212 God, if this were enough XXV. My Wife 214 Trusty, dusky, vivid, true XXVI. Winter 215 In rigorous hours, when down the iron lane XXVII. 215 The stormy evening closes now in vain XXVIII. To an Island Princess 216 Since long ago, a child at home XXIX. To Kalakua 218 The Silver Ship, my King—that was her name XXX. To Princess Kaiulani 218 Forth from her land to mine she goes XXXI. To Mother Maryanne 219 To see the infinite pity of this place XXXII. In Memoriam, E. H. 220 I knew a silver head was bright beyond compare XXXIII. To my Wife 221 Long must elapse ere you behold again XXXIV. To the Muse 222 Resign the rhapsody, the dream XXXV. To my Old Familiars 223 Do you remember—can we e'er forget XXXVI. 224 The tropics vanish, and meseems that I XXXVII. To S. C. 225 I heard the pulse of the besieging sea XXXVIII. The House of Tembinoka 227 Let us, who part like brothers, part like bards CONTENTS PAGE xxxix. THE WOODMAN 232 In all the grove, nor stream nor bird XL. TROPIC RAIN ...... 237 As the single pang of the blow, when the metal is mingled well XLI. AN END OF TRAVEL .... 238 Let now your soul in this sub- stantial world XLII 238 We uncommiserate pass into the night XLIII. The Last Sight 239 Once more I saw him. In the lofty room XLIV . 239 Sing me a song of a lad that is gone XLV. To S. R. CROCKETT .... 240 Blows the wind to-day, and the sun and the rain are flying XLVI. EVENSONG 241 The embers of the day are red 107 Page:The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu/259 Page:The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu/260

CONTENTS PAGE vin. To H. C. Bunner . . . .382 You know the way to Arcady ix. From Wishing-land .... 383 Dear Lady, tapping at your door x. THE WELL-HEAD 384 The withered rushes made a flame xi. THE MILL-HOUSE . . . . . 386 An alley ran across the pleasant wood xn. ST. MARTIN'S SUMMER . . . 389 As swallows turning backward xm. . . . . . . . . . . . 390 All influences were in vain xiv. 392 The old world moans and topes xv 393 I am like one that has sat alone xvi 394 The whole day thro', in con- tempt and pity xvn 395 The old chimaeras, old receipts xviii. DEDICATION 396 My first gift and my last, to you xix. PRELUDE 397 By sunny market-place and street 354 Page:The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu/369 Page:The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu/370 CONTENTS PAGE xxxix 411 Had I the power that have the will XL * . . 412 dull cold northern sky XLI. APOLOGETIC POSTSCRIPT OF A YEAR LATER . -.^ . - . . 413 If you see this song, my dear XLII. To MARCUS . , . . . . 414 You have been far, and I XLIII. To OTTILIE .-> ... ..-;:. . . 415 You remember, I suppose XLTV 416 This gloomy, northern day XLV. To A YOUTH 417 See, with strong heart, youth, the change XLVI. HOPES 419 Tho' day by day old hopes de- part XLVII i. .. .. ... . 420 1 have a friend ; I have a story XLVIII. . . ...... ,, ........ . 420 Link your arm in mine, my lad XLIX 422 The wind is without there and howls in the trees 357 Page:The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu/372 Page:The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu/373 CONTENTS PAGE LXXI. . 446 Light as my heart was long ago LXXII 446 Gather ye roses while ye may LXXIII. POEM FOR A CLASS RE-UNION . 447 Whether we like it, or don't LXXIV v . . . 448 I saw red evening through the rain LXXV . 449 Last night we had a thunder- storm in style LXXVI 450 lady fair and sweet LXXVII 451 If I had wings, my lady, like a dove LXXVIII. Rondels 452 1. Far have you come, my lady, from the town 2. Nous ri* irons plus au bois We'll walk the woods no more 3. Since I am sworn to live my life LXXTX - . . . . 453 Eh, man Henley, you're a Don 360 CONTENTS PAGE 454 LXXX ' . All night through, raves or broods LXXXI. . . . ..... . 454 The rain is over and done LXXXII. . . .... . . . 455 There where the land of love LXXXIII. ..'.'..... . 455 Love is the very heart of spring LXXXI v. On his Pitiable Transformation 456 I who was young so long LXXXV 457 I, who all the winter through LXXXVI 457 Love what is love? A great and aching heart LXXXVII 458 Soon our friends perish LXXXVIII. . . . . . . . i . 458 As one who having wan- dered all night long LXXXIX. . . . . . . ... . .. 459 Strange are the ways of men 361 CONTENTS PAGE xc 460 The wind blew shrill and smart xci . . . 461 Man sails the deep a while xai 462 The cock's clear voice into the clearer air xcin 463 Now when the number of my years xciv 464 What man may learn, what man may do XCV. The Susquehanna and the Delaware 465 Of where or how, I nothing know xcvi 466 If I could arise and travel away xcvii 466 Good old ale, mild or pale xcvin 467 Nay, but I fancy somehow, year by year xcix 467 My wife and I, in one roman- tic cot 362 CONTENTS PAGE c . . 468 At morning on the garden seat ci . - . v . . . . 469 Small is the trust when love is green ai 470 Know you the river near to Grez cm . -; , . . . 470 It's forth across the roaring foam, and on towards the west civ. FAREWELL . . . . . . . 472 Farewell, and when forth cv. AN ENGLISH BREEZE . . . . 472 Up with the sun, the breeze arose cvi. To Miss CORNISH 475 They tell me, lady, that to-day cvii. To Rosabelle 474 When my young lady has grown great and staid cvm .. 475 As in their flight the birds of song cix. PRAYER . . . ... . . 477 I ask good things that I detest ex. THE PIPER .'.'.'.. . . 478 Again I hear you piping, for I know the tune so well cxi. Epistle to Albert Dew-Smith 479 Figure me to yourself, I pray 363 Page:The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu/378 Page:The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu/379 Page:The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu/380 Page:The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu/381 Page:The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Edition, Volume 8, 1922.djvu/382 CONTENTS PAGE 3. I have a hoard of treasure in my breast 4. As starts the absent dream- er, when a train 5. Not undelightful, friend, our rustic ease 6. As in the hostel by the bridge, I sate 7. The strong man's hand, the snow-cool head of age 8. As Daniel, bird-alone, in that far land CLXIV. The Family. 7 526 i. Mother and Daughter High as my heart!—the quip be mine ii. The Daughter, Teuila, Native Name for Adorner 528 Man, child or woman, none from her in. . . . . .... 530 About my fields, in the broad sun iv. .... . . . . 531 Tall as a guardsman, pale as the east at dawn 369 CONTENTS PAGE v. ... . 531 The Adorner of the uncomely—Those vi. 532 What glory for a boy of ten vii. 533 The old lady (so they say) but I vin 533 I meanwhile in the populous house apart ix 535 These rings, O my beloved pair CLXV. AIR OF DIABELLI'S .... 536 Call it to mind, my love CLXVI. DE EROTIO PUELLA .... 540 This girl was sweeter than the song of swans CLXVII 541 I look across the ocean CLXVIII 541 I am a hunchback, yellow faced CLXIX. Song . 542 Light foot and tight foot CLXX. The New House .... 542 Is the house not homely yet 370 CONTENTS PAGE CLXXI. 543 Men marvel at the works of man CLXXII. To Master Andrew Lang . 544 You, that are much a fisher in the pool CLXXIII. To the Stormy Petrel . . 545 Ever perilous and precious, like an ember from the fire CLXXIV. . , . . . . ... 546 The indefensible impulse of my blood CLXXV 546 Who would think, herein to look CLXXVI. Epistle to Charles Baxter 547 Noo lyart leaves blaw ower the green CLXXVII. Ad Martialem 549 God knows, my Martial, if we two could be CLXXVIII. De M. Antonio 550 Now, Antonius, in a smiling age CLXXIX. , . 550 Not roses to the rose, I trow CLXXX. To Miss Rawlinson . . . 551 Of the many flowers you brought me 371 CONTENTS PAGE CLXXXI 551 The pleasant river gushes CLXXXII. To H. F. BROWN .... 553 Brave lads in olden musi- cal centuries CLXXXIII. To W. E. HENLEY . . . 554 Dear Henley, with a pig's snout on CLXXXIV 555 O Henley, in my hours of ease CLXXXV 556 All things on earth and sea CLXXXVI. On Some Ghostly Companions at a Spa .... 557 1 had an evil day when I CLXXXVII. To CHARLES BAXTER . . . 558 Blame me not that this epistle CLXXXVIII. To Henry James .... 560 Adela, Adela, Adela Chart CLXXXIX 561 Here you rest among the valleys cxc. . . 562 And thorns, but did the sculptor spare 372 CONTENTS CXCI My brain swims empty and light cxcii. The Light-Keeper . As the steady lenses circle CXCHI. The Daughter of Herodias . Three yellow slaves were set to swing cxciv. The Cruel Mistress Here let me rest, here nurse the uneasy qualm cxcv. Storm . The narrow lanes are vacant and wet cxcvi. Stormy Nights .... I cry out war to those who spend their utmost cxcvu. Song at Dawn. . I see the dawn creep round the world CXCVHI. IN LUPUM Beyond the gates thou gav'st a field to till cxcix. IN CHARIDEMUM .... You, Charidemus, who my cradle swung cc. AD NEPOTEM Nepos, twice my neighbour (since at home

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CONTENTS

PAGE
I. Summer Night 375
About us lies the summer night
II. 376
I sit up here at midnight
III. 377
Lo! In thine honest eyes I read
IV. 377
Though deep indifference should drowse
V. 378
My heart, when first the blackbird sings
VI. 378
1. I dreamed of forest alleys fair
2. I am as one that keeps awake
3. Last night I lingered long without
4. Once more upon the same old seat
VII. Verses Written in 1872 381
Though he that kind and true