Latin for beginners (1911)/Part II/Lesson XXXVI

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LESSON XXXVI

REVIEW OF PRINCIPAL PARTS • PREPOSITIONS
YES-OR-NO QUESTIONS

208. The following list shows the principal parts of all the verbs you have had excepting those used in the paradigms. The parts you have had before are given for review, and the perfect participle is the only new form for you to learn. Sometimes one or more of the principal parts are lacking, which means that the verb has no forms based on that stem. A few verbs lack the perfect passive participle but have the future active participle in -ūrus, which appears in the principal parts instead.

Irregular Verbs

sum
absum
1

esse
abesse
dare

fuī
āfuī
dedī

futūrus
āfutūrus
datus

be
be away
give

1. is best classed with the irregular verbs because of the short a in the present and participial stems.

Conjugation I

portō portāre portāvī portātus carry

So for all verbs of this conjugation thus far used.

Conjugation II

contineō
dēleō
doceō
egeō
faveō
iubeō
moveō
noceō
pāreō
persuādeō
prohibeō
respondeō
sedeō
studeō
videō

continēre
dēlēre
docēre
egēre
favēre
iubēre
movēre
nocēre
pārēre
persuādēre
prohibēre
respondēre
sedēre
studēre
vidēre

continuī
dēlēvī
docuī
eguī
fāvī
iussī
mōvī
nocuī
pāruī
persuāsī
prohibuī
respondī
sēdī
studuī
vīdī

contentus
dēlētus
doctus
——
fautūrus
iussus
mōtus
nocitūrus
——
persuāsus
prohibitus
respōnsus
-sessus
——
vīsus

hold in, keep
destroy
teach
lack
favor
order
move
injure
obey
persuade (from)
restrain, keep
reply
sit
be eager
see

Conjugation III

agō
crēdō
dīcō
discēdō
dūcō
faciō[1]
fugiō
iaciō
interficiō
mittō
rapiō
resistō

agere
crēdere
dīcere
discēdere
dūcere
facere
fugere
iacere
interficere
mittere
rapere
resistere

ēgī
crēdidī
dīxī
discessī
dūxī
fēcī
fūgī
iēcī
interfēcī
mīsī
rapuī
restitī

āctus
crēditus
dictus
discessus
ductus
factus
fugitūrus
iactus
interfectus
missus
raptus
——

drive
believe
say
depart
lead
make
flee
hurl
kill
send
seize
resist

Conjugation IV

mūniō
reperiō
veniō

mūnīre
reperīre
venīre

mūnīvī
rep´perī
vēnī

mūnītus
repertus
ventus

fortify
find
come

209. Prepositions. 1. We learned in §§ 52, 53 that only the accusative and the ablative are used with prepositions, and that prepositions expressing ablative relations govern the ablative case. Those we have had are here summarized. The table following should be learned.

ā or ab, from, by

cum, with

, down from, concerning

ē or ex, out from, out of

prō, before, in front of; for, in behalf of

sine, without

2 Prepositions not expressing ablative relations must govern the accusative (§ 52). Of these we have had the following:

ad, to; apud, among; per, through

There are many others which you will meet as we proceed.

3. The preposition in when meaning in or on governs the ablative; when meaning to, into, against (relations foreign to the ablative) in governs the accusative.

210. Yes-or-No Questions. Questions not introduced by some interrogative word like who, why , when, etc., but expecting the answer yes or no, may take one of three forms:

  1. Is he coming? (Asking for information. Implying nothing as to the answer expected.)
  2. Is he not coming? (Expecting the answer yes.)
  3. He isn^t coming, is he? (Expecting the answer no.) These three forms are rendered in Latin as follows:
  4. Venitne? is he coming ?
  5. Nōnne venit? is he not coming?
  6. Num venit? he isn’t coming, is he?
a. -ne, the question sign, is usually added to the verb, which then stands first.
b. We learned in § 56. that yes-or-no questions are usually answered by repeating the verb, with or without a negative. Instead of this, ita,vērō, certē, etc. (so, truly, certainly, etc.) may be used for yes, and nōn, minimē, etc. for no if the denial is emphatic, as, by no means, not at all. 211..

EXERCISES

First learn the special vocabulary, p. 290.

I.

  1. Nōnne habēbat Cornēlia ōrnāmenta aurī? Habēbat.
  2. Num Sextus lēgātus scūtum in dextrō bracchiō gerēbat? Nōn in dextrō, sed sinistrō in bracchiō Sextus scūtum gerēbat.
  3. Frūstrā bella multa ab Gallīs gesta erant.
  4. Ubi oppidum ā perfidō Sextō occupātum est, oppidānī miserī gladiō interfectī sunt.
  5. Id oppidum erat plēnum frūmentī.
  6. Nōnne Sextus ab oppidānīs frūmentum postulāvit? Vērō, sed iī recūsāvērunt frūmentum dare.
  7. Cūr oppidum ab Sextō dēlētum est? Quia frūmentum recūsātum est. 8. Ea victōria nōn dubia erat.
  8. Oppidānī erant dēfessī et armīs egēbant.
  9. Num fugam temptāvērunt? Minimē.

II.

  1. Where was Julia standing? She was standing where you had ordered.
  2. Was Julia wearing any ornaments? She had many ornaments of gold.
  3. Did she not attempt flight when she saw the danger? She did.
  4. Who captured her? Galba captured her without delay and held her by the left arm.
  5. She didn´t have the lady’s gold, did she? No, the gold had been taken by a faithless maid and has been brought back.

Fourth Review, Lessons XXVII-XXXVI, §§ 513-516

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References

  1. faciō has an irregular passive which will be presented later.