League of Universal Brotherhood Pledge

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Various versions, in chronological order:

  • Believing all war to be inconsistent with the spirit of Christianity, and destructive of the best interests of mankind, I do hereby pledge myself never to enlist or enter into any army or navy, or to yield any voluntary support or sanction to the preparation for or prosecution of any war, by whomsoever, or for whatsoever proposed, declared, or waged. And I do hereby associate myself with all persons, of whatever country, condition, or color, who have signed, or shall hereafter sign this pledge, in a "League of Universal Brotherhood;" whose object shall be to employ all legitimate and moral means for the abolition of all war, and all the spirit and all the manifestations of war, throughout the world; for the abolition of all restrictions upon international correspondence and friendly intercourse, and of whatever else tends to make enemies of nations, or prevents their fusion into one peaceful brotherhood; for the abolition of all institutions and customs which do not recognize and respect the image of God and a human brother in every man, of whatever clime, color, or condition of humanity.[1]
  • Believing all war to be inconsistent with the spirit of Christianity, and destructive of the best interests of mankind, I do hereby pledge myself never to enlist or enter into any army or navy, or to yield any voluntary support or sanction to the preparation or prosecution of any war, by whomsoever, or for whatsoever purpose, declared, or waged. And I do hereby associate myself with all persons, of whatever country, condition, or colour, who have signed, or shall hereafter sign this pledge, in a "League of Universal Brotherhood;" whose object shall be to employ all legitimate and moral means for the abolition of all war, and all the spirit and all the manifestations of war, throughout the world; for the abolition of all restrictions upon international correspondence and friendly intercourse, and of whatever else tends to make enemies of nations, or prevents their fusion into one peaceful brotherhood; for the abolition of institutions and customs which do not recognize and respect the image of God and a human brother in every man, of whatever clime, colour, or condition of humanity.[2]
  • Believing all War to be inconsistent with the spirit of Christianity, and destructive of the best interests of mankind, I do hereby pledge myself never to enlist or enter into any army or navy, or to yield any VOLUNTARY support or sanction to the preparation for or prosecution of any War, by whomsoever, or for whatsoever proposed, declared or waged. And I do hereby associate myself with all persons, of whatever country, condition, or colour, who have signed, or shall hereafter sign this pledge, in a "League of Universal Brotherhood"; whose object shall be to employ all legitimate & moral means for the abolition of all War, and all the spirit and all the manifestations of War, throughout the World; for the abolition of all restrictions upon international correspondence and friendly intercourse, and of whatever else tends to make enemies of nations, or prevents their fusion into one peaceful brotherhood; for the abolition of all institutions & customs which do not recognize & respect the image of God & a human brother in every man, of whatever clime, colour, or condition of humanity.[3]
  • Believing all war to be inconsistent with the spirit of Christianity, and destructive of the best interests of mankind, I do hereby pledge myself never to enlist or enter into any army or navy, or to yield any voluntary support or sanction to the preparation for or prosecution of any war, by whomsoever, or for whatsoever purposes declared or waged. And I do hereby associate myself with all persons, of whatever country, condition, or colour, who have signed, or shall hereafter sign this pledge, in a "League of Universal Brotherhood;" whose object shall be to employ all legitimate and moral means for the abolition of all war, and all the spirit and all the manifestations of war, throughout the world; for the abolition of all restrictions upon international correspondence and friendly intercourse, and of whatever else tends to make enemies of nations, or prevents their fusion into one peaceful brotherhood; for the abolition of all institutions and customs which do not recognize and respect the image of God and a human brother in every man, of whatever clime, colour, or condition of humanity.[4]
  • Believing all war to be inconsistent with the spirit of Christianity, and destructive to the best interests of mankind, I do hereby pledge myself never to enlist or enter into any army or navy, or to yield any voluntary support or sanction to the preparation or prosecution of any war, by whomsoever, for whatsoever proposed, declared, or waged. And I do hereby associate myself with all persons, of whatever country, condition, or color, who have signed... in a 'League of Universal Brotherhood'; whose object shall be to employ all legitimate and moral means for the abolition of all war, and all spirit, and all the manifestation of war, throughout the world; for the abolition of all restrictions upon international correspondence and friendly intercourse, and of whatever else tends to make enemies of nations, or prevents their fusion into one peaceful brotherhood[5]
  • Believing all war to be inconsistent with the spirit of Christianity, and destructive to the best interests of mankind, I do hereby pledge myself never to enlist or enter into any army or navy, or to yield any voluntary support or sanction to the preparation for or prosecution of any war, by whomsoever, for whatsoever proposed, declared, or waged. And I do hereby associate myself with all persons, of whatever country, condition, or colour, who have signed, or shall hereafter sign this pledge, in a "League of Universal Brotherhood"; whose object shall be to employ all legitimate and moral means for the abolition of all war, and all spirit, and all the manifestation of war, throughout the world; for the abolition of all restrictions upon international correspondence and friendly intercourse, and of whatever else tends to make enemies of nations, or prevents their fusion into one peaceful brotherhood; for the abolition of institutions and customs which do not recognize the image of God and a human brother in every man of whatever clime, colour, or condition of humanity.[6]


References[edit]

  1. Burritt, E. (1846). "The League of Universal Brotherhood". The Advocate of Peace and Universal Brotherhood (Worcester, Massachusetts: Henry J. Howland) 1 (10): 243. Retrieved 28 February 2018. 
  2. "League of Universal Brotherhood Lettersheet (used).... - Lot #47215". Heritage Auctions. 15 September 1848. Archived from the original on 28 February 2018. 
  3. M J (1899). "Note on Ocean penny postage". St. Martin's-le-grand (April): 172. 
  4. Bogue, David (1852). The men of the time in 1852, or, Sketches of living notables. David Bogue, printed by G. Barclay. p. 77f. 
  5. Schmidt, Peter (1984). Peace Is Our Profession: Teaching Nonviolence in the Schools. Washington, DC: National Endowment for the Humanities. , quoting Cooney, Robert; Michalowski, Helen (1977). The Power of the people. Culver City, CA: The Peace Press. p. 26-27. 
  6. Brock, P. (2015). Radical Pacifists in Antebellum America. Princeton Legacy Library. Princeton University Press. p. 208. ISBN 978-1-4008-7873-4. Retrieved 28 February 2018.