Moral letters to Lucilius/Index of proper names

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Index of Proper Names[edit]

  • A
    • Academic school of Philosophy, its lofty ideals, xxix. 11; a definition of happiness, lxxi. 18; scepticism of, lxxxviii. 44 f.
    • L. Accius (Roman poet, 2nd century B.C.), lviii. 5
    • Achaia (province of Greece), earthquakes in, xci. 9 f.
    • Acheron (the lake), lv. 6
    • Achilles, age of, compared with that of Patroclus, lxxxviii. 6
    • Aegialus, a farmer on the old estate of Scipio, lxxxvi. 14 ff.
    • Aelius Sejanus (prime minister of Tiberius), dangers of acquaintance with, lv. 3
    • Aetna, celebrated by poets, li. 1; proposed ascent of, by Lucilius, lxxix. 2 ff.
    • Africa, Pompey in, xciv. 65; Cato's march through the deserts of, civ. 33; crops in, cxiv. 26; marbles from, cxv. 8
    • Agamemnon, his desire to return home to Mycenae, lxvi. 26
    • M. Vipsanius Agrippa (counsellor of Augustus) on harmony in government, xciv. 46 f.
    • Alban villa (Seneca's), visit to, cxxiii. 1 f.
    • Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.), sayings of, liii. 10, lix. 12; crimes and tragedy of, due to drink, lxxxiii. 19 ff.; his desire to conquer the globe, xci. 17; his conquests of Greece, Persia, and India, xciv. 62 f.; cxiii. 29 f.; cxix. 7
    • Alexandria, fast sailing ships from, lxxvii. 1 f.
    • Anacharsis (Scythian philosopher, fl. 600 B.C.), discussed as the inventor of the potter's wheel xc. 31
    • Ancus Marcius (Roman king), doubtful parentage of, cviii. 30
    • Antipater (of Tarsus, Stoic philosopher, 2nd century B.C.), refutation of a Peripatetic syllogism, lxxxvii. 38 ff.; his view regarding non-essentials, xcii. 5
    • M. Antonius (friend of Caesar and rival of Augustus), ruined by wine and Cleopatra, lxxxiii. 25
    • M. Gavius Apicius (epicure, age of Tiberius), extravagance of, xcv. 42; gluttony of, cxx. 19
    • Apion (grammarian, 1st century A.D.), his opinion concerning the authorship of the Homeric cycle, lxxxviii. 40 f.
    • Appius Claudius Caecus (censor 312 B.C.), source for archaic oratorical style, cxiv. 13
    • Archedemus (Stoic of Tarsus, second century B.C.), authority of, cxxi. 1
    • Ardea (ancient city of Latium, capital of the Rutulians), capture of, xci. 16; country-place of Lucilius, cv. 1
    • Argos (kingdom in the Peloponnesus), a fictitious king of, lxxx. 7
    • Aristo (of Chios, Stoic philosopher, 3rd century B.C.), saying of, xxxvi. 3; weeds out many departments of philosophy, lxxxix. 13; on the superfluity of precepts, xciv. 1 ff.; on admiration of superfluous things, cxv. 8 f.
    • Aristo (philosopher, identity unknown), anecdotes of, xxix. 6
    • Aristotle (384-322 B.C.), debt to Socrates, vi. 6; on genus and species, lviii. 9; on cause, form, matter, etc., lxv. 4
    • L. Arruntius (cos. A.D. 6), imitator of Sallust's style, cxiv. 17 ff.
    • Asclepiades (Greek physician at Rome, 2nd cent. B.C.), xcv. 9
    • Asia, earthquakes in, xci. 9
    • Asinus Gallus (son of Asinus Pollio), dangers of friendship with, lv. 3
    • Athenodorus (of Tarsus, librarian at Pergamus, friend of Cato, on frankness toward the gods, x. 5
    • Athens, visited by wise men from the East, lviii. 31
    • Attalus (Stoic philosopher, teacher of Seneca), on friendship, ix. 7; on the memory of lost friends, lxiii. 5; on the value of pain, lxvii. 15; simile used by, lxxii. 8; on "returning the chalice to our own lips," lxxxi. 22; on philosophical ambition, cviii. passim; on the worthlessness of riches, cx. 14 ff.
    • T. Pomponius Atticus, made immortal by Cicero's correspondence, xxi. 4; regularity of his correspondence, cxviii. 1
    • Augustus (Roman Emperor), confidence in the hard drinkers Piso and Cossus, lxxxiii. 14 f.; delegates power to Maecenas, cxiv. 6
  • B
    • Baba and Isio, futility of, xv. 9
    • Liber (Bacchus), travels of, xciv. 63
    • Baiae, luxuries of, li. 1 ff., lv. passim, lvii. 1
    • Aufidius Bassus (perhaps the historian whose work the Elder Pliny continued, see Plin. Ep. iii. 5. 6), illness of, xxx. 1 ff.
    • Decimus Iunius Brutus (c. 84-43 B.C., see n.), cowardly death of, lxxxii. 12 f.
    • M. Iunius Brutus (author, friend of Cicero, and slayer of Caesar), on precepts, xcv. 45
    • Acilius Buta (temp. Tiberius), night life of, cxxii. 10 ff.
  • C
    • Caecilius (temp. Cicero), penuriousness of, cxviii. 2
    • Caelius (see note ad loc.) quoted, cxiii. 26
    • Caesar (Augustus, the Emperor). See Augustus.
    • Gaius Caesar (Caligula, emperor 31-41 A.D.), slain by Chaerea, iv. 7; witticism of, lxxvii. 18
    • C. Julius Caesar, hostility to Cato, xiv. 12 f., xxiv. 8; villas of, li. 11; conqueror of Pompey, lxxxiii. 12, ambition of, xciv. 65 f.; relations with Cato the Younger, xcv. 70; part in Clodian trial, xcvii. 2, 8; civ. 29 f.; cxviii. 2
    • Callistus (a favourite of the Emperor Claudius), disdains his former master, xlvii. 9
    • Licinius Calvus (see note ad loc.), xciv. 25
    • Cambyses (son of Cyrus the Great, king of the Medes and Persians, 6th century B.C.), madness of, lxxxvi. 1
    • Campania, thoughts inspired by the sight of, xlix. 1; its effect upon Hannibal, li. 5; home-sickness for, lv. 8
    • Candavian desert, xxxi. 9
    • Canopus, vices of, li. 3
    • Capreae (modern Capri, the outpost of the bay of Naples), lxxvii. 2
    • Gaius Cassius (one of the murderers of Caesar), temperate habits of lxxxiii. 12
    • Cato, "wisdom" of, quoted, xciv. 27; cxix. 2
    • M. Porcius Cato (the Elder), effect of the mob upon, vii. 6; model for good conduct, xi. 10; simple life of, lxxxvi. 10; his scorn of trappings, lxxxvii. 9 ff., xxv. 6; nobility of, xcv. 72; civ. 21
    • M. Porcius Cato (the Younger, d. 46 B.C.), his glory, xiii. 14; bravery, xiv. 12 ff.; last moments, xxiv. 6 ff.; scorn of loose living, li. 12; as species, lviii. 12; deserving of honour, lxiv. 10; heroic suicide of, lxvii. 7, 13; lxx. 19, 22; defeat of, lxxi. 8, 10, 11; obedience to fate, lxxi. 16 f.; dictum of, lxxi. 15; his courage in the face of Caesar and Pompey, xcv. 69 ff.; his part in the trial of Clodius, xcvii. 1 ff.; heroism of, xcviii. 12; civ. 21; conduct during Civil War, ib. 29ff.; used as a dialectic illustration, cxvii. 13; contrasted with Vatinius, cxviii. 4 and cxx. 19; quoted, cxxii. 2
    • Catulus (cos. 78 B.C.), witticism of, xcvii. 6
    • Cerberus, false ideas concerning, xxiv. 18 ff.
    • Chaerea, Cassius, murderer of Caligula, iv. 7
    • Charinus, archon at Athens, xviii. 9
    • Charondas (Sicilian law-giver, 6th century B.C.), xc. 6
    • Charybdis (between Italy and Sicily, opposite to Scylla), phenomena of, lxxix. 1 f.
    • Chelidon (a eunuch of Cleopatra), richness of, lxxxvii. 16
    • Chimaera (see note ad loc.), cxiii. 9 f.
    • Chrysippus (successor of Cleanthes as head of the Stoic school), saying of, ix. 14; advice of, xxii. 11, xxxiii. 4; civ. 22; utters great words, cviii. 38; on the source of muscular activity, cxiii. 23 f.
    • Chrysippus (unknown), victim of greetings, lvi. 3
    • M. Tullius Cicero, his tribute to philosophy, xvii. 2; confers immortality upon Atticus, xxi. 4; his deliberate speech, xl. 11; his opinion of the lyric poets, xlix. 5; on the use of essentia, lviii. 6; as species, lviii. 12; quoted in regard to the trial of Clodius, xcvii. 3 ff.; style and rank of, c. 7 ff.; as translator, cvii. 10; quoted (from the De Re Publica), cviii. 30 ff.; on rhetorical subtleties, cxi. 1; style of, cxiv. 16; advice to Atticus, cxviii. 1 f.
    • Tillius Cimber (one of the conspirators against Caesar), his inordinate love of liquor, lxxxiii. 12 f.
    • Claranus (a friend of Seneca), his heroic conduct during illness, lxvi. 1-4
    • Cleanthes (successor of Zeno as head of the Stoic school), disciple of Zeno, vi. 6; dicta of, xxxiii. 4 ff.; his humble station, xliv. 3; object of veneration, lxiv. 10; on the relation of precepts to general principles of philosophy, xciv. 4 ff.; hymn of, cvii. 10 f.; on rules of poetry, cviii. 10; on the source of muscular activity, cxiii. 23 f.
    • P. Clodius Pulcher (d. 52 B.C.), defendant in adultery charge, xcvii. 2 ff.
    • Ti. Coruncanius (cos. 280 B.C.), source for archaic oratorical style, cxiv. 13
    • L. Licinius Crassus (b. 140 B.C.), source for oratorical vocabulary, cxiv. 13
    • M. Licinius Crassus (the triumvir), death of, iv. 7; opponent of Cato, civ. 29; riches of, cxix. 9
    • Crates (of Thebes, Cynic philosopher c. 300 B.C.), his advice to a young man, x. 1
    • Croesus, captivity of, xlvii. 12
    • Cumae, lv. 2
    • C. Scribonius Curio (cos. 76 B.C.), source for oratorical vocabulary, cxiv. 13
    • Cynic School of Philosophy, its high standards, xxix. 11; free speech, xxix. 1
    • Cyprus, often wasted by earthquakes, xci. 9
    • Cyrenaic school (precursor of Epicureanism), remove physics and logic, and are content with ethics alone, lxxxix. 12
  • D
    • Dahae (see n.), objects of Roman conquest, lxxi. 37
    • Darius (king of Persia), xciv. 63; cxix. 7
    • Darius, the mother of, in captivity, xlvii. 12
    • P. Decius Mus (both father and son, heroes of the Latin wars, 4th century B.C.), heroism and self-sacrifice of, lxvii. 9
    • Demetrius Poliorcetes (acquired control of Athens 307 B.C.), conversation of, ix. 18 f.
    • Demetrius (Cynic philosopher and friend of Seneca), consistent simplicity of, xx. 9; companion of Seneca, lxii. 3; definition of an untroubled existence, lxvii. 14; his contempt for gossip, xci. 19
    • Democritus (Greek atomic philosopher, 5th and 4th centuries B.C.), on the importance of the individual, vii. 10; supposed madness of, lxxix. 14; discussed as the inventor of the arch, xc. 32 f.
    • M. Curius Dentatus (cos. 290 B.C.), sternness of, cxx. 19
    • Dexter (the tribune who executed Lepidus), iv. 7
    • Didymus (surnamed "Brazen-Bowels," scholar of Alexandria, fl. 1st century B.C.), his voluminous and variegated writings, on Aeneas, Anacreon, Sappbo, etc., lxxxviii. 37
    • Diogenes (Cynic philosopher, 4th century B.C.), his free speech, xxix. 1; slavery, xlvii. 12; contrasted as a philosopher with Daedalus the inventor, xc. 14
    • Dossennus (ancient Latin comic writer, or a type in the Atellane farce), inscription on the tomb of, lxxxix. 7
  • E
    • Egypt, marbles from, cxv. 8
    • Egyptians, customs of bandits among the, li. 13
    • Q. Ennius (Roman poet, 239-169 B.C.), lviii. 5; verses on Scipio Africanus, cviii. 32 f.; indebtedness to Homer, ib. 34
    • Epicurean, the spirit of an, xlviii. 1; a philosophy of leisure, lxviii. 10; void, lxxii. 9; definition of philosophy as twofold, lxxxix. 11
    • Epicurus (founder of the school, 342-279 B.C.), his influence, vi. 6, xxi. 3; self-denial, xviii. 6 ff.; addressed, xx. 11; confers glory, xxi. 3 ff.; wide application of his sayings, viii. 8, xxi. 9, xxxiii. 2; arguments concerning mythology, xxiv. 18; bravery, xxxiii. 2; Lucilius' style resembles his, xlvi. 1; quoted, ii. 5 f., iv. 10, vii. 11, viii. 7, ix. 1 and 20, xi. 8, xii. 10, xiii. 16, xiv. 17, xv. 9, xvi. 7, xvii. 11, xviii. 14, xix. 10, xx. 9, xxi. 3 ff., xxii. 6 and 14, xxiii. 9, xxiv. 22 ff., xxv. 5 f., xxvi. 8, xxvii. 9, xxviii. 9, xxix. 10, xxx. 14, lii. 3 f.; on the joy of suffering, lxvi. 18, lxvii. 15; on the painless body and the serene mind, lxvi. 45; on the different classes of goods, lxvi. 47 f.; late-won renown of, lxxix. 15 f.; on the payment of obligations, lxxxi. 11; declares virtue alone not sufficient for happiness, lxxxv. 18; on calm amid pain, xcii. 25; quoted, xcvii. 13, 15
    • Eretrian school (somewhat inclined toward the Socratic), scepticism of, lxxxviii. 44 f.
    • Euripedes (Greek tragic poet), quoted, xlix. 12; anecdote of, cxv. 15 f.
  • F
    • Papirius Fabianus (an adviser and teacher of Seneca), his modesty, xi. 4; deliberate style, xl. 12; calmness of his audience, lii. 11; authority for the use of the word essentia, lviii. 6; style of, c. passim
    • Fabii (clan famous in early Roman history), sacrifice in behalf of the state, lxxxii. 20
    • Q. Fabius Maximus (hero of second Punic war), simple life of, lxxxvi. 10
    • C. Fabricius Luscinus (temp. Pyrrhus), self-restraint of, xcviii. 13; loyalty and temperance of, cxx. 6; plainness of, cxx. 19
    • Felicio, pet slave of Seneca, son of Philositus, xii. 3
    • Fenestella (Augustan antiquarian) on the death of Romulus, cviii. 31
    • Flaccus (friend of Lucilius), death of, lxiii. 1 ff.
    • Floralia (Roman festival, April 28 to May 3), tributes to Cato during the, xcvii. 8
  • G
    • Gallio (brother of Seneca), illness of, in Achaia, civ. 1 and note ad loc.
    • Genius (the "patron saint" of Roman men), cx. 1
    • German (gladiator), revolting suicide of a, lxx. 20
    • Germans, bound-up hair of, cxxiv. 22
    • Germany, training of children in, xxxvi. 7
    • Julius Graecinus (man of noble character, slain by Caligula), witticism of, xxix. 6
    • Graian Alps, xxxi. 9
    • C. Sempronius Gracchus (tribune 123 B.C.), source for oratorical vocabulary, cxiv. 13
    • Greeks, the word oestrus used by, lviii. 2; proverbs of, xxxiii. 7; headlong style of, xl. 11; as species of man, lviii. 12; their idea of the poet, lviii. 17; their use of paradoxes (inopinata) in philosophy, lxxxi. 11; futilities of dialectic, lxxxii. 8 f.; their use of indifferentia, lxxxii. 10; encyclic arts of the, lxxxviii. 23; definition of wisdom, lxxxix. 7; definition of orbatio, lxxxvii. 39; on calm, xcii. 6; a proverb of the, cxiv. 1; preceptive philosophy of, xcv. 1; ib. 10; association with their philosophers, civ. 21; tragic poets, quoted, cxv. 14 f.
  • H
    • Hannibal, weakened by Campanian luxuries, li 5 f.; contrasted with Scipio, lxxxvi. 3
    • Harpaste, blindness of, l. 2 f.
    • Q. Haterius (orator of the Early Empire), rapidity of, xl. 10
    • Hecato (a philosopher of Rhodes and pupil of Panaetius, c. 100 B.C.), on hope and fear, v. 7; on self-knowledge, vi. 7; on love, ix. 6
    • Hecuba (Queen of Troy), captivity of, xlvii. 12
    • Helen, age of, compared with Hecuba's, lxxxviii. 6
    • Hephaestion (volcanic region in Lycia, in Asia Minor), lxxix. 3
    • Heraclitus (philosopher of Ephesus, c. 500 B.C.), sayings of, xii. 7, lviii. 23
    • Hercules, travels of, xciv. 63
    • Hermarchus (successor of Epicurus as head of the school), close adherence to Epicurus, vi. 6; dicta of, xxxiii. 4; philosopher of the third grade, lii. 4
    • Herodotus (Greek historian, 5th century B.C.), reminiscnece of, vi. 5
    • Hesiod, reminiscence of, i. 5; misquoted by Sabinus, xxvii. 6; compared with Homer in seniority, lxxxviii. 6
    • Hippocrates ("Father of Medicine," 5th cent. B.C.), xcv. 9; on the health of women, ib. 20
    • Homer, called the poet by the Greeks, lviii. 17; on the rapid and gentle styles, xl. 2; misquoted by Sabinus, xxvii. 6; claimed by various schools of philosophy as a witness in their behalf, lxxxviii. 5 f.; in various connexions, lxxxviii. passim; mentions the potter's wheel, xc. 31; indebtedness of Ennius to, cviii. 34
    • Horatius (defender of Rome against Tarquins), heroism of, cxx. 7
    • Q. Horatius Flaccus (Roman poet, 65-8 B.C.), quoted, lxxxvi. 13, cxix. 13 f.; cxx. 20 f.
  • I
    • Idomeneus (prominent in state affairs and a contemporary of Epicurus), correspondence with Epicurus, xxi. 3 ff., xxii. 5
    • Ixion, torments of, in the lower world, xxiv. 18 ff.
  • J
    • Jugurtha (African prince, conquered by Marius), xciv. 66
    • Juno, dedications to, xcv. 47; patroness of women, cx. 1
    • Jupiter, amid the Stoic conflagration, ix. 16; happiness of, xxv. 4; popularly called the father of Alexander, lix. 12; comparison of, with the ideal sage, lxxiii. 12 ff.; dedications to, xcv. 47; ib. 72; addressed in hymn of Cleanthes, cvii. 10 f.; happiness of, cx. 18; independence of cxix. 7
    • Juvenal, compared, xiv. 9 n.
  • L
    • Lacon, Spartan boy who refused to do menial service, lxxvii. 14 f.
    • Lacones (Spartans under Leonidas at Thermopylae), lxxxii. 20 ff.
    • Ladas, a traditionally swift runner, lxxxv. 4
    • C. Laelius Sapiens (statesman and friend of Scipio the Younger), effect of the mob upon, vii. 6; a model for mankind, xxv. 6; worthy of honour, lxiv. 10; sanity of, xcv. 72; civ. 21
    • Latin Language, narrow limits of, lviii. passim; technical terms in, xcv. 65
    • Aemilius Lepidus (favourite of Caligula, slain by him A.D. 39), iv. 7
    • Aebutius Liberalis (friend of Seneca), disconsolate over the Lyons conflagration of c. 64 A.D., xci. passim
    • Drusus Libo (duped into dreams of empire, committed suicide A.D. 16), contemplated self-destruction of, lxx. 10
    • Licinus (native of Gaul; appointed govenor in 15 B.C.), riches of, cxix. 9; cxx. 19
    • Liternum (town on sea-coast of Campania near Cumae), abode of Scipio in exile, li. 11, lxxxvi. 3
    • T. Livius (the historian, age of Augustus), comparison of his style with that of Lucilius, xlvi. 1; reckoned as both historian and philosopher, c. 9
    • Lucilius, procurator in Sicily, xxxi. 9 ff., li. 1; b. at Pompeii or Naples, xlix. 1; a Roman knight, xliv. 2 ff.; interested in philosophy, passim, esp. xl. 2; author, xlvi. 1; poetry of, viii. 10, xxiv. 21. See Introduction, p. ix.
    • T. Lucretius Carus (Roman poet, 1st century B.C.), as species of man, lviii. 12; quoted xcv. 11; on corporeality, cvi. 8; on fear, cx. 6 f.
    • Lucrine oysters (from a lake near the Bay of Naples), delicate taste of, lxxviii. 23
    • Lugudunum (capital of Gaul, now Lyons), destruction of, xci. passim
    • Lycurgus (of Sparta, 9th century B.C. ?), giver of laws, xc. 6
  • M
    • Macedonia, earthquakes in, xci. 9
    • Maeander (river in Phrygia, Asia Minor), tortuous course of, civ. 15
    • C. Cilnius Maecenas (prime minister of Augustus), character of, xix. 9 f.; quoted, ib.; witty saying of, xcii. 35; his womanly fear of death, ci. 10 ff.; careless speech of, cxiv. passim; daintiness of, cxx. 19
    • M. Tullius Marcellinus (a friend of Seneca), faults of, xxix. 1 ff.; suicide of, lxxvii. 5 ff.
    • C. Marius (rival of Sulla), the massacres of his epoch, xlvii. 10; villas of, li. 11; political and martial ambition of, xciv. 66
    • Iunius (?) Marullus (see note ad loc.), consolation addressed to, xcix. 1 ff.
    • M. Valerius Messala Corvinus (statesman and man of letters, b. 59 B.C.) describes Aetna, li. 1
    • Maximus (a friend of Seneca), lxxxvii. 2 ff.
    • Medi, objects of Roman conquest, lxxi. 37
    • Megaric school, scepticism of, lxxxviii. 44 f.
    • Menelaus (Homeric hero), actor posing as, lxxx. 8
    • Meta Sudans (see ad loc.), the haunt of noisy pedlars, lvi. 4
    • Q. Caecilius Metellus Numidicus (Roman general and statesman, retired into exile, 100 B.C.), conduct in exile, xxiv. 4
    • Metrodorus (follower of Epicurus), vi. 6; xiv. 17; his simple life, xviii. 9; dicta, xxxiii. 4; a genius of the second grade, lii. 3; his modest manner of life, lxxix. 15 f.; on the thankfulness of the sage, lxxxi. 11; quoted, xcviii. 9; on the pleasure of sadness, xcix. 25 ff.
    • Metronax (philosopher), lectures by, lxxvi. 4; death of, xciii. 1 (and note)
    • Mithridates (king of Pontus), conquered by Pompey, xciv. 65
    • Iulius Montanus (poet and favourite of Tiberius), anecdote of, cxxii. 11 f.
    • Mucius Scaevola (hero of Roman-Etruscan wars), puts his hand into the flames, xxiv. 5; heroism of, xcviii. 12
  • N
    • Cn. Naevius (early Roman writer of drama) quoted, cii. 16
    • Naples, memories of, xlix. 1; journey to, lvii. 1
    • P. Ovidius Naso (Roman poet, age of Augustus), quoted, xxxiii. 4
    • Natalis (early Empire), vileness and richness of, lxxxvii. 16
    • Pinarius Natta (see note ad loc.), cxxii. 11 f.
    • Nausiphanes (disciple of Pyrrho the Sceptic, 4th century B.C.), on seeming and non-being, lxxxviii. 43 f.
    • Neapolis (now Naples), a place for retirement, lxviii. 5; theatre at, lxxvi. 4
    • Neptune, the god to whom the sailor prays, lxxiii. 5; invoked by the Rhodian pilot, lxxxv. 33
    • Nesis (islet in the bay of Naples), liii. 1
    • Nestor (Homeric hero), long life of, lxxvii. 20
    • Nile, the distracting noise of its waters, lvi. 3; rising in summer, civ. 15
    • Niobe, restraint of, in her mourning, lxiii. 2
    • Nomentum (Latin town 14 m. N.E. of Rome), Seneca's villa at, civ. 1 ff., cx. 1
    • Numidian outriders, cxxiii. 7
  • O
    • P. Ovidius Naso (Roman poet, 43 B.C.-18 A.D.), his description of Aetna, lxxix. 5; quoted. xc. 20; on the lower order gods, cx. 1; on gold, cxv. 13
    • P. Octavius (gourmand, age of Tiberius), bids against Apicius, xcv. 42
  • P
    • Pacuvius (a vice-governor of Syria under Tiberius), mock-funerals of, xii. 8
    • Panaetius (head of Stoic school, 2nd century B.C.), dicta assigned to, xxxiii. 4; on love, cxvi. 5 f.
    • Paphus (city on west coast of Cyprus), often wrecked by earthquakes, xci. 9
    • Sextus Papinius (an Early Empire night-liver), cxxii. 15 f.
    • Parmenides (Greek philosopher, fl. 500 B.C.), on the One, lxxxviii. 44 f.
    • Parthenope (another name for Naples), favourite place of Lucilius, liii. 1
    • Parthia, kings of, xvii. 11
    • Parthians (tribe E. of Euphrates), allusion to the defeat and death of Crassus, 53 B.C., iv. 7; training of Parthian children, xxxvi. 7; as species of man, lviii. 12; flowing hair of, cxxiv. 22
    • Paulina (wife of Seneca), civ. 2 ff., note ad loc., and Introduction, vol. i.
    • Pedo Albinovanus (poet, contemporary of Ovid), anecdote of, cxxii. 15 f.
    • Penelope, moral character of, lxxxviii. 8
    • Pennine Alps, xxxi. 9
    • Peripatetics, their dislike for the common herd, xxix. 11; referred to in jest, ibid. 6; their softening of Stoic paradoxes, lxxxv. 3, 31, etc.; their objections to Stoic syllogisms, lxxxvii. 12, 38; their establishment of economic philosophy, lxxxix. 10; their interpretation of emotion, cxvi. 1; on wisdom and being wise, cxvii. 11 f.
    • Persians, bravery of, xxxiii. 2; objects of Roman conquest, lxxi. 37
    • Phaedo (contemporary of Plato) quoted, xciv. 41
    • Phalaris, tyrant of Agrigentum in Sicily (6th century B.C.), the bronze bull of, lxvi. 18
    • Pharius, pacemaker for Seneca, lxxxiii. 4
    • Phidias (Athenian sculptor, 5th century B.C.), ix. 5; variety of his materials, lxxxv. 40
    • Philip (of Macedon, father of Alexander), conquests of, xciv. 62
    • Phrygian priests (worshippers of Cybele), enthusiasm of, cviii. 7
    • Lucius Piso (Roman official under Augustus), abnormal drunkenness of, lxxxiii. 14. f.
    • L. Munatius Plancus (gov. of Transalpine Gaul, 43 B.C.), founder of Lyons, xci. 14
    • Plato (Athenian philosopher, 428-341 B.C.), debt to Socrates, vi. 6; read by Cato, xxiv. 6; ennobled by philosophy, xliv. 3 f.; captive, xlvii. 12; theory of ideas, lxv. 7; worthy of honour, lxiv. 10; on being, lviii. 1 and passim; quoted, xliv. 4 and passim; Laws of, discussed by Posidonius, xciv. 38; master of wisdom, cviii. 38
    • C. Asinius Pollio (patron of Vergil), style and rank of, c. 7 ff.
    • Polyaenus (correspondent of Epicurus), influence of Epicurus upon, vi. 6, xviii. 9
    • Polyclitus (Greek sculptor, 5th century B.C.), works of, lxv. 5
    • Pompeii, probable home of Lucilius, xlix. 1; recalls memories of Seneca's boyhood, lxx. 1
    • Gn. Pompeius Magnus (the triumvir), his shyness, xi. 4; death, iv. 7; villas, li. 11; disagrees with Cato, xiv. 12 f.; three defeats of his forces, lxxi. 8 ff.; ambitious campaigns of, xciv. 64 f.; relations with Cato the Younger, xcv. 70; part in Clodian trial, xcvii. 8; civ. 29 ff.; cxviii. 2
    • Pomponius (possibly Pomponius Secundus, a contemporary of Seneca, writer of tragedies and letters), iii. 6
    • Porsenna (Etruscan king), encounter with Mucius, xxiv. 5, lxvi. 51 ff.
    • Posidonius (Stoic philosopher, pupil of Panaetius and friend of Cicero), dicta assigned to, xxxiii. 4; on length of life, lxxviii. 28; opinion on drunkenness, lxxxiii. 10; definition of riches, lxxxvii. 31 ff.; on the arts and crafts, lxxxviii. 21; on the sage and the inventor, xc. 5 ff.; on the weakness of the flesh, xcii. 10; on Plato's Laws, xciv. 38; on precepts, and other aids to virtue, xcv. 65 f.; civ. 22; cviii. 38; on independence of fortune, cxiii. 28; cxxi. 1
    • Prometheus, title of a work of Maecenas, xix. 9
    • Protagoras (Greek philosopher of Abdera. 5th century B.C.), opinion on the flexibility of dialectic, lxxxviii. 43 f.
    • Publilius Syrus (writer of farces and mimes, 1st century B.C.), greatness of, viii. 8 f.; quoted, xciv. 28; cviii. 8 ff.
    • Puteoli (a coast-town near Naples in Campania), voyage of Seneca to, liii. 1; the idlers of, lxxvii. 1
    • Pyrrhonic school, scepticism of, lxxxviii. 44 f.
    • Pyrrhus (king of Epirus, 3rd cent. B.C.), relations with Fabricius, cxx. 6
    • Pythagoras (Greek philosopher, 6th century B.C.), rules of, lii. 10; teacher of many famous lawgivers. xc. 6; on impressions of divinity, xciv. 42; reasons for abstaining from animal food, cviii. 17 ff.
    • Pythocles, a friend of Idomeneus, xxi. 7 f.
  • R
    • M. Atilius Regulus (hero of first Punic war), the sufferings of, lxvii. 7, 12; his pledge of honour, lxxi. 17; heroism of, xcviii. 12
    • Rhodian (Telesphorus the), cowardly words of, lxx. 6
    • Roman style, dignity and slowness of, xl. 11; Romans as species of man, lviii. 12
    • Rome, complicated life in, l. 3
    • Romulus (first Roman king), death of, cviii. 31
    • P. Rutilius Rufus (orator and statesman, banished 92 B.C.), exile of, xxiv. 4, lxvii. 7; retirement of, lxxix. 14; heroism of, xcviii. 12
  • S
    • Calvisius Sabinus (a typical parvenu), his illiteracy and bad taste, xxvii. 5 ff.
    • Sallust, compared, xx. 5; quoted, lx. 4
    • C. Sallustius Crispus (historian, close of Republic), quoted, cix. 16; aped by later historians because of archaic style, cxiv. 17 ff.
    • Sarmatia (on the eastern side of Scythia), vanity of its rulers, lxxx. 10
    • Satellius Quadratus, ridicules Sabinus, xxvii. 7 ff.
    • Saturnalia, description of the, xviii. 1
    • Sattia, anecdote about the longevity of, lxxvii. 20
    • Gaius Mucius Scaevola (Roman legendary period), voluntary self-mutilation of, lxvi. 51 ff.
    • Mamercus Aemilius Scaurus (prominent but unscrupulous statesman in the reign of Tiberius), witticism of, xxix. 6
    • P. Cornelius Scipio (Africanus Major, conqueror of Hannibal), a model for mankind, xxv. 6; his exile at Liternum, li. 11; adoration by Seneca at his house and tomb, lxxxvi. 1 ff.; praised by Ennius, cviii. 32 f.
    • P. Cornelius Scipio (Africanus Minor, conqueror of Carthage in 146 B.C.), lxvi. 13; friendship with Laelius, xcv. 72
    • P. Cornelius Scipio Nasica (admiral, defeated by Caesar's fleet. 46 B.C.), heroism of, lxx. 22; defeat of, lxxi. 10
    • Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio (father-in-law of Pompey), heroism of, xxiv. 9 ff.
    • Scribonia (see n.), witty saying of, lxx. 10
    • Scylla (dangerous rock on Italian side of Sicilian strait), lxxix. 1 f., xcii. 9.
    • Scythia (from the Carpathians eastward), vanity of its rulers, lxxx. 10; clothing of its inhabitants, xc. 16
    • Scythians (tribe inhabiting steppes of S. Russia), flowing hair of, cxxiv. 22
    • L. Annacus Seneca, (see Introduction, vol. i.), addresses himself, lxviii. 10
    • Cornelius Senecio (friend of Seneca), untimely death of, ci. 1 ff.
    • Serapio (unknown), disordered utterances of, xl. 2
    • Annaeus Serenus (friend and possibly relative of Seneca; praefectus vigilum at Rome), loss of, lxiii. 14 f.
    • Sertorius (1st cent. B.C.) conquered by Pompey in Spain, xciv. 64
    • Servius Tullius (Roman King), doubtful parentage of, cviii. 30
    • Cornelius Severus (contemp. of Ovid, author of a Bellum Siculum), description of Aetna, lxxix. 5
    • Q. Sextius (the Elder), inspiring writings of, lxiv. 2 ff.; a simile of, lix. 7; his comparison of the sage with Jupiter, lxxiii. 12, 15; declines honour at Caesar's hand, xcviii. 13; vegetarianism of, cviii. 17 f.
    • Sicily, dangers of Scylla and Charybdis, xiv. 8, xxxi. 9, xlv. 2; Lucilius' travels through, lxxix. 1; crops in, cxiv. 26
    • Sisyphus, punished in Hades, xxiv. 18 ff.
    • Socrates, inspiring personality of, vi. 6; effect of the mob upon, vii. 6; glory of, xiii. 14; his resignation, xxiv. 4; on globe-trotting, xxviii. 2; facing the Thirty Tyrants, xxviii. 8; humble birth, xliv. 3; worthy of reverence, lxiv. 10; drinks the poison, lxvii. 7; resignation of, lxx. 9, lxxi. 17; emphasis upon character, lxxi. 7; on truth and virtue, lxxi. 16; late-won renown of, lxxix. 14; resignation of, xcviii. 12; on restless travel, civ. 7; ib. 21; sufferings of, civ. 27 f.
    • Solon (see n. ad loc.), law-giver of Athens, and one of the seven wise men, xc. 6
    • Sotion (the Pythagorean, contempory of Seneca), recollections of, xlix. 2; on vegetarianism, cviii. 17 ff.
    • Speusippus (4th century B.C., predecessor of Xenocrates as head of the Academy), qualifies the definition of the bonum, lxxxv. 18
    • Stilbo (Megarian philosopher and a strong influence on the Cynic and Stoic schools, fl. 4th century B.C.), attacked by Epicurus, ix. 1 ff.; teacher of Crates, x. 1; quoted, ix. 18
    • Stoic, a certain, who gave good advice to Marcellinus, lxxvii. 6
    • Stoics (school of philosophy), agreement with Stilbo, ix. 19; boldness of their style, xiii. 4; their caution, xxii. 7; wise advice of their leaders, xxii. 11; their lofty aims, xxix. 11; free ideas, xxxiii. 4; theory on the fate of the soul at death, lvii. 7; definitions of the primary genus, lviii. 13 ff.; views on pleasure, lix. 1; on cause and matter, lxv. 2 and passim; recommendation of the quiet life, lxviii. 1; reply to Peripatetics regarding virtue, lxxxv. 31; paradoxes of the, lxxxvii. 1; on the value of precepts, xciv. 2 ff.; on the limits to mourning, xcix. 27 f.; their many great masters, cviii. 38; resemblance to the early Romans in their opinion of the gods, cx. 1; their leaders on the "animality" of the virtues, cxiii. 1 ff.; on the primal essence, cxiii. 23, on the emotions, cxvi. 1 ff. and 7; on wisdom and corporeality, cxvii. 1 ff.; on bonum and honestum, cxx. 1 ff.; overdone ideas of omniscience, cxxiii. 15 f.
    • Sulla (dictator at Rome, 1st century B.C.), anger of, xi. 4; disobeyed by Rutilius, xxiv. 4
    • Syria, governed by Pacuvius, xii. 8; earthquakes in, xci. 9
    • Syrtes (north coast of Africa), quicksands, xxxi. 9; cave-homes of dwellers by the, xc. 17
  • T
    • Tanusius Geminus (historian, 1st cent. B.C.), "heaviness" of, xciii. 11. For discussion of his identification with Volusius see edd. of Catullus, 36
    • Tarentum (city in Southern Italy), a place for retirement, lxviii. 5
    • Tauromenium (now Taormina) in Sicily, lxxix. 1
    • P. Terentius Afer (writer of comedies, 2nd cent. B.C.) quoted xcv. 53
    • Themison (pupil of Asclepiades, 1st cent. B.C.), xcv. 9
    • Theophrastus (successor of Aristotle as head of the Peripatetic School), views on friendship, iii. 2
    • Tiberius (Roman emperor, 14-31 A.D.), mentioned with other royal connexions of Atticus, xxi. 4; his confidence in the drunken Cossus, lxxxiii. 15; puts a fish up for auction, xcv. 42; opposition to foreign cults, cviii. 22; epigram of, cxxii. 10
    • Tibur (now Tivoli), earthenware from, cxix. 3
    • Tigris, disappearance and reappearance of, civ. 15
    • Timagenes (from Alexandria, historian, and one-time friend of Augustus), grudge against Rome, xci. 13
    • Timon, dinners like those of, xviii. 7
    • Q. Aelius Tubero (2nd cent. B.C.), simple sacrifice of, xcv. 72 f.; xcviii. 13; civ. 21; cxx. 19
    • Twelve Tables, as source for orators' vocabularies, cxiv. 13
  • U
    • Ulysses, temptations of, xxxi. 2; victim of seasickness, liii. 4; remedy against Siren Songs, lvi. 15; home-sickness of, lxvi. 26; wanderings of, lxxxviii. 7 f.; self-restraint of, cxxiii. 12
  • V
    • C. Valgius Rufus (Roman poet, b. 81 B.C.), describes Aetna, li. 1
    • P. Terentius Varro (surnamed Atacinus, Latin poet, 82-37 B.C.), quoted, lvi. 6
    • Varus (an Early Empire parasite), epigram of, cxxii. 12 f.
    • Servilius Vatia (rich man of leisure in the early Empire), country-house of, lv. 2 ff.
    • P. Vatinius (see note ad loc.), xciv. 25; cxviii. 4; cxx. 19
    • P. Vergilius Maro (Roman poet, 70-19 B.C.), immortalizes Nisus and Euryalus, xxi. 5; the artist's conception of, lviii. 20; mentioned in illustration of obsolete words, lviii. 2 ff.; quoted, xii. 9, xviii. 12, xxi. 5, xxviii. 1 and 3, xxxi. 11, xxxvii. 3, xli. 2, xlviii. 11, xlix. 7, liii. 3, lvi. 12, lviii. 2 ff., lix. 17, lxiv. 4, lxvii. 8, lxx. 2, lxxiii. 10 f., 15, lxxvii. 12, lxxviii. 15; description of Aetna, lxxix. 5; quoted, lxxxii. 7, 16, 18, lxxxiv. 3, lxxxv. 4, lxxxvi. 15 f., lxxxvii. 20, lxxxviii. 14, 16, lxxxix. 17, xc. 9, 11, 37; on Scylla, xcii. 9; quoted, xcii. 29, 34, xciv. 28; xcv. 33, 68 f.; xcviii. 5; ci. 4; ib. 13; cii. 30; civ. 10; ib. 24; ib. 31 (comparing Cato with Achilles); cvii. 3; cviii. 24, 26, 29, 34 (indebtedness to Ennius); cxiv. 23; cxv. 4 f.; cxxii. 2; cxxiv. 1
    • M. Vinicius (see note ad loc.), cxxii. 12
    • P. Vinicius, ridiculed by Asellius and Varius for his stammering, xl. 9 f.
    • Virgo, the aqueduct, a colder plunge than the Tiber, lxxxiii. 5
  • X
    • Xenocrates (4th century B.C., successor of Speusippus as head of the Academy), qualifies the definition of the bonum, lxxxv. 18
  • Z
    • Zaleucus (of Magna Graecia, 7th century B.C.), law-maker, xc. 6
    • Zeno (founder of the Stoic school, fl. 300 B.C.), model for Cleanthes, vi. 6; advice of, xxii. 11; dicta of, xxxiii. 4 ff.; object of veneration, lxiv. 10; over-subtle syllogism of, lxxxii. 9, 19; objections to drunkenness, lxxxiii. 9 ff.; on death, civ. 21; master of wisdom cviii. 38
    • Zeno, of Elea (Greek dialectic philosopher, 5th century B.C.), denial of everything, lxxxviii. 44 f.