Page:Confederate Military History - 1899 - Volume 7.djvu/246

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CONFEDERATE MILITARY HISTORY.

John C. Babcock (Union). (1166) August, 1864, Lieut.-Col. George W. Huguley, in Gracie's brigade, Johnson's division. (1227) September 1, 1864, in Gracie's brigade with General Beauregard. (1311) September 30, 1864, in Gracie's brigade, Johnson's division.

No. 89—(1190) October 31, 1864, Gracie's brigade, B. R. Johnson's division. (1242) November 30, 1864, Gracie's brigade, B. R. Johnson's division. (1368) December 31, 1864, Gracie's brigade, B. R. Johnson's division.

No. 95—(233) March 25, 1865, mentioned in report of Colonel Weygant (Union), skirmish near Hatcher's Run. (268) March 25, 1865, mentioned in report of General Chamberlain (Union), skirmish near Hatcher's Run, says: "Advance was made with great vigor and boldness, though not in heavy force." (1274) Maj. Lewis H. Crumpler, in Moody's brigade, Johnson's division, Lee's army, April 9, 1865.

No. 96—(202) January 22, 1865, mentioned by General Parke (Union). (610) Mentioned by General Meade (Union). (1174) January 31, 1865, Lieut.-Col. George W. Huguley, in Gracie's brigade, Lee's army. (1183) January 31, 1865, in Gracie's brigade, Lee's army. (1273) February 28, 1865, in Gracie's brigade, Lee's army.

No. 97—(219, 220) Mentioned by Colonel Weygant (Union), in report of fight near Watkins house, Petersburg, March 25, 1865.

THE SIXTIETH ALABAMA INFANTRY.

The Sixtieth Alabama was formed of four companies of the First, and six companies of the Third battalion, Hilliard's legion, under the command of Colonel Sanford, at Charleston, Tenn., November 25, 1863. It spent the winter in the campaign in East Tennessee and proceeded to Richmond in the spring. It lost heavily at Drewry's Bluff, where it was complimented on the field by General Gracie; was in the trenches at Petersburg and lost almost continually; suffered severely at White Oak road and Hatcher's Run. At Appomattox, it is said, the men were "huzzaing over a captured battery and a routed foe," when the news of the surrender was received. The regiment surrendered 165, rank and file. Col. John