Page:Confederate Military History - 1899 - Volume 7.djvu/298

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279
CONFEDERATE MILITARY HISTORY.

cavalry, D. M. Wisdom commanding Forrest's regiment. (621) Mentioned by General Chalmers in report of capture of Fort Pillow, April 12, 1864.

No. 59—(278) Wisdom's regiment at Williams' landing, five miles above Savannah, April 5, 1864. (460, 481) At Tuscumbia, April, 1864. (482) Genenal Dodge, in west Tennessee, April 24th, says, Wisdom's is Forrest's old regiment. (594) Columbus, Miss., March 7th, assigned to Colonel Thompson's brigade, Forrest's cavalry. (609) Detachment ordered to Marion county, Ala., to protect foundries, by command of General Forrest, March 10th.

No. 78—(593) In Buford's division, with Gen. N. B. Forrest, May 10, 1864. (631) Buford's division, with Gen. S. D. Lee, June 1st. (647) Mentioned by General Forrest, Tupelo, Miss., June 26th, Tennessee companies consolidated with others, etc.

Eleventh Regiment, Alabama cavalry, also called Tenth, Col. John R. B. Burtwell: No. 93—(1233) November 20, 1864, Roddey's brigade, Taylor's army, district of North Alabama. No. 94—(634) December 1, 1864, Roddey's brigade.

THE TWELFTH ALABAMA CAVALRY.

The Twelfth regiment of Alabama cavalry was formed from a battalion recruited by Col William H. Hundley and Major Bennett. It operated in east Tennessee and was consolidated with the First Alabama near Murfreesboro. It fought at Murfreesboro and Chickamauga. Four companies were added to it, and it was attached to Hagan's brigade. It saw hard and continuous fighting in the battles of the Dalton-Atlanta campaign. One company lost 20 men in killed and wounded while defending a bridge near Rome. At Atlanta it was complimented on the field by General Wheeler. It lost 25 or 30 men in a melée with Stoneman, and fought at Campbellsville, repulsing Brownlow's brigade, with a loss of 45 men. It fought at Averasboro, and disbanded the night before the surrender. Its first colonel was the gallant Warren S. Reese. He was succeeded by Marcellus Pointer, a brave and intrepid officer, who was