Page:Confederate Military History - 1899 - Volume 7.djvu/722

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231
CONFEDERATE MILITARY HISTORY.

of Humphreys' brigade and of thirty companies in Davis' brigade, present the following as the strength and losses of the seventy companies:

Whole number on rolls....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................9,407

Total loss from all causes ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................6,661

"Of the 2,746 men on the rolls as present and absent accounted for, about one-third were under arms when General Lee surrendered—the remainder being absent on furlough, in prison, on detail, and for other causes.

"From this and other data in my possession, I have thought it might be interesting to deduce something like an approximate estimate of the total strength and losses of the troops furnished by the State of Mississippi. * * *

Whole number in service.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 78,000

Total loss from all causes ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................59,250


Balance accounted for ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................18,750


"And of this number about thirty per cent were absent for various causes at the general surrender of the armies."

As to the morale of the army and the causes from which it suffered, Colonel Power says: "Our reverses for the last two years of the war, the despondency, speculation and extortion of many of our people at home, the inability of the government to pay the troops promptly or to furnish them with anything like adequate supplies of food or clothing, the absolute destitution of many families of soldiers and, toward the last, the seeming hopelessness of the struggle, all conspired to depress the soldier's heart."

On October 16, 1865, the first legislature elected after the war assembled, and the first governor of Mississippi elected, in his inaugural address, among other things said:

"The South, having ventured all on the arbitrament of the sword, has lost all save her honor, and now accepts the result in good faith. It is our duty to address ourselves to the promotion of peace and order — to the restoration of the law, the faith of the Constitution and the