Page:Folk-lore - A Quarterly Review. Volume 26, 1915.djvu/444

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430 SJiort Bibliographical Notices.

in part a reminiscence of " Sindibad the Sailor "; the " Poem of the Tor " bears a strange resemblance to the famous " North of England Wake Dirge "; the " Great Worm of Shannon " is based on the belief that the winding course of a river is due to the wriggling of a serpent. We have also the curious belief in an insect known as the Dardaol, which must be burnt : " because if you stamp on it with your foot, or kill it with a stone or a stick, then the next time your foot, or the stick, or the stone strikes a person or an animal it will give rise to mortal injury."

Enough has been said to indicate the value of Dr. Hyde's col- lection, and it may be hoped that he will soon give us another instalment from the wide material at his disposal.

ERRATA.

Vol. xxvi., p. 2IO, line 9— for G. A. Lebour ;t'««' Nona Lebour. Do. p. 211, line 21—forT. B. VnxUidgQ read ] . B. Partridge.

Books for Review should be addressed to

The Editor of Folk-Lore, c/o Messrs. Sidgwick & Jackson, Ltd. Adam St., Adelphi, London, W.C.