Page:Latin for beginners (1911).djvu/202

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page needs to be proofread.

178 INDIRECT STATEMENTS


Indirect statements ( i . He says that the Gauls are brave after a verb in -^ 2. He says that the Gauls were brave the present tense [3. He says that the Gauls will be brave Indirect statements f i . He said that the Gauls were brave after a verb in -| 2. He said that the Gauls had been brave a past tense [3. He said that the Gauls would be brave We see that in English a. The indirect statement forms a clause introduced by the conjunc- tion that. b. The verb is finite (cf . § 1 73) and its subject is in the nominative. c. The tenses of the verbs originally used are changed after the past tense, He said. . Indirect Statements in Latin. In Latin the direct and indirect statements above would be as follows : r I . Gain sunt fortes [^3. Galli erunt fortes

. Dicit or Dixit Gallos esse fortis {He says or He said the 

Gauls to be brave) ^ . Dicit or Dixit Gallos fuisse fortis {He says or He said Statements j the Gauls to have been brave)'^ I 3. Dicit or Dixit Gallos futiiros esse fortis {He says or He (^ said the Gauls to be about to be brave) ^ Comparing these Latin indirect statements with the English in the preceding section, we observe three marked differences : a. There is no conjunction corresponding to that. b. The verb is in the infinitive and its subject is in the accusative. c. The tenses of the infinitive are not changed after a past tense of the principal verb. . Rule. Indirect Statements. When a direct statement be- comes indirect^ the principal verb is changed to the infinitive and its subject nominative becomes subject accusative of the infinitive.

These parenthetical renderings are not inserted as translations, but merely 

to show the literal meaning of the Latin Indirect