Page:Newdressmakerwit00butt.djvu/159

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155
PRESSING

The New Dressmaker, 1921, Ill. No. 0365.pngIll. 365. The Proper Way to Open Seams in a Velvet Coat can be used on velvet, plush, velours, duvetyn and materials with a high nap, satin and silk.

Velvet may be mirrored or panned by passing an iron over the surface of the velvet, ironing with the nap. After velvet has gone through this process it can be pressed as much as is necessary.

Nearly all pressing is done on the wrong side. Suitings and heavy cloth may be pressed on the right side by steaming. Wring out a cloth as dry as possible and lay it over the place to be pressed. Have the irons hot and press firmly until the cloth is nearly dry. Turn the garment to the wrong side and press until thoroughly dry.

The shine which sometimes comes in pressing may be removed by placing a dry cloth over the shiny place. Then wring out as dry as possible a second cloth which has been thoroughly wet. Place it over the dry one, and with a hot iron pass firmly over the spot. If the material has a nap requiring raising, the place may be brushed with a stiff brush and the process of steaming repeated.

Many fabrics retain the imprint of the basting-thread under heavy pressing. For such material it is necessary to give a light pressing first, removing all basting-threads before the final pressing.

PRESSING PLAITS IN A SKIRT OR DRESS. Turn the skirt wrong side out and slip it over an ironing board. Pin the top and bottom of the skirt to the board taking care that the plaits be perfectly flat underneath. In wool and cotton materials a sponge cloth may be placed over the skirt and pressed thoroughly until the cloth is dry. This method creases the material well and the plaits will stay in position for a long time.

In silk material press the plaits with an iron that is not too hot. Afterward the iron may be run under the plaits to smooth the part underneath. Slip the skirt off the board and remove the bastings.

When a plaited skirt is made of washable material it is not difficult to launder if one goes about it in the right way. The lower part of the skirt should not be pressed out flat, but each plait as it is pressed from the stitched upper portion should be laid in plaits all the way to the bottom of the skirt or dress, smoothed out and arranged with the hand, and then pressed into position. Afterward the iron may be run under the plaits to smooth the part underneath.

In laundering or pressing a skirt you will realize the value of shrinking the material and following the correct grain line of the weave.