Page:Ten Tragedies of Seneca (1902).djvu/459

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Lines 514—536]
439
MEDEA.

MEDEA.

Fortune, hitherto, has always been at my feet!

JASON.

Acastus is on the march, and the other enemy, Creon, is nearer!

MEDEA.

Let us fly together; I am unwilling to arm my hands against any father-in-law, nor does Medea urge, by any means, that Jason should soil his hands with the blood of his kinsman. Fly then, with me, and thou wilt be innocent of such deeds!

JASON.

And who could resist such a force, if a double war be entered upon, as it were, if Creon and Acastus were to join their armies!

MEDEA.

Now think of the Colchian battalions—now think of the generalissimo of Æeta with his army, and then add to them the Scythian and Grecian contingents,—why, I would drive the enemy into the sea with these.

JASON.

I really fear the terrible power appertaining to the sceptre!

MEDEA.

Rather consider whether it is thou art hankering after it thyself!

JASON.

Lest we may excite suspicion by this long interview, let me suggest that our conversation should come to a close.

MEDEA.

Now, oh I mighty Jupiter, thunder forth throughout the entire heavens—Stretch forth thy right hand, prepare thy avenging lightnings, and shake up the whole universe, as they dispel the clouds with their violence, nor let thy lightnings be delicately balanced for any defined aim! It does not matter, let them strike either myself or Jason, whichever of the two might happen to fall, a culprit will be sure to perish therefrom, so that thy lightnings can make no mistake, as to the one upon whom they should strike!