Page:Theory and Practice of Handwriting.djvu/181

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FOREIGNER’S

Manual of English.

BY
H. F. CLARKE.


8vo, Cloth. Introduction Price, 75 Cents.


It is a generally conceded fact that any language may be taught more successfully by employing that language only.

Gouin has demonstrated that the most direct method is that associating the object or action with the spoken words, thus giving a mind picture and leading to thought in the language to be acquired; also he lays great stress upon the systematic building up of a vocabulary by frequent repetition and use of the simple words and phrases, practically as a child first learns to talk.

For the purpose of teaching English to foreigners, especially where classes may be composed of several nationalities, as in our large city public schools, the want of a practical method, capable of being used by an English teacher has long been felt. It is quite impossible to obtain teachers with sufficient command of the several languages, as well as English, to prepare the children of our foreign population so that they may take their place in the regular classes; in recognition of this fact the Foreigner’s Manual has been prepared.