Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 108 Part 4.djvu/270

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108 STAT. 2904 PUBLIC LAW 103-337—OCT. 5, 1994 (5) A short-warning attack by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea would cause major losses to the combined United States-Republic of Korea ground force. (b) SENSE OF CONGRESS.—I t is the sense of Congress that the President should urge the Republic of Korea to continue to improve its military ground forces with emphasis on counterartillery capabilities, defense against ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction, combined United States-Republic of Korea logistics capabilities, combined United States-Republic of Korea medical support, and combined United States-Republic of Korea capabilities for tactical intelligence and indications and warning of a North Korean attack. (c) REPORT. — Not later than January 15, 1995, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to Congress a report, in classified form, on— (1) the readiness of the military forces of the Republic of Korea to defeat an attack by the military forces of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea; and (2) the adequacy of the defense acquisition strategy of the Republic of Korea to meet its primary ground defense mission. SEC. 1323. MILITARY PLANNING FOR THE SIZE AND STRUCTURE OF A FORCE REQUIRED FOR A MAJOR REGIONAL CONTIN- GENCY ON THE KOREAN PENINSULA. (a) FINDINGS,— Congress makes the following findings: (1) The Secretary of Defense conducted the Bottom-Up Review during 1993 to establish the size and structure for the Armed Forces for the Post-Cold-War era. (2) The report on the Bottom-Up Review cites the need for the Armed Forces to be large enough to prevail in two major regional conflicts "nearly simultaneously. (3) The report on the Bottom-Up Review gives special consideration to a scenario that hypothesizes that the two "nearly simultaneous" conflicts would occur in Korea and the Persian Gulf. (4) The United States sent 7 Army divisions, the equivalent of 10 Air Force tactical fighter wings, 70 heavy bombers, 6 Navy aircraft carrier battle groups, and 5 Marine Corps brigades to the Persian Gulf to fight the war against Iraq. (5) The report on the Bottom-Up Review asserts that the forces needed to fight two conflicts similar to that with Iraq can be drawn from a total military force of between 15 and 16 Army divisions, 20 Air Force tactical fighter wings, up to 184 heavy bombers, 11 active Navy aircraft carriers (along with one reserve/training carrier), gind the equivalent of 12 Marine Corps brigades. (6) The report on the Bottom-Up Review recognizes that approximately 100,000 members of the Armed Forces will be stationed in Europe. (7) The report on the Bottom-Up Review recognizes that sizeable numbers of United States forces could be involved in peace enforcement and intervention operations at any one time. (8) The report on the Bottom-Up Review makes no specific recommendation as to the number of forces to be held in reserve to provide a rotation base either to relieve troops in the event