Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 39 Part 2.djvu/522

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CONVENTION—DENMARK. AUGUST 4, 1916. 17].5 And whereas in giving advice and consent to the ratification of the S_§a°§;"“"°”’ °’ *h° said Convention, it was declared by the Senate of the United States Comimcm of com in their resolution that “ such advice and consent are given with the Senrw r=¤¢i¤¤¢i<>¤· understanding, to be expressed as a part of the instrument of ratification, that such Convention shall not be taken and construed by the High Contracting Parties as imposing any trust upon the United States with respect to any funds belonging to the Danish National Church in the Danish West Indian Islands, or in which the said Church ma have an interest, nor as imposing upon the United States any duty or responsibility with respect to the management of any property belonging to said Church, beyond protecting said Church in the possession and use of church property as stated in said Convention, in the same manner and to the same extent only as other churches shall be protected in the possession and use of their several properties; " And whereas it was further provided in the said resolution “That the Senate advises and consents to the ratification of the said Convention on condition that the attitude of the United States in this particular, as set forth in the above proviso, be made the subject of an exchange of notes between the Governments of the two High Contracting Parties, so as to make it plain that this condition is understood and accepted by the two Governments, the purpose hereof being to bring the said Convention clearly within the Constitutional powers of the United States with respect to church establishment and freedom of religion ”; P And whereas this condition has been fulfilled by notes exchanged °“'°'m°' between the two High Contracting Parties on January 3, 1917; _ And whereas the said Convention has been duly ratified on both umass. °x` parts, and the ratifications of the two Governments were exchanged in the City of Washington, on the seventeenth day of January, one thousand nine hundred and seventeen; Pmkmum Now, therefore, be it known that I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, have caused the said Convention to be made public, to the end that the same and every article and clause thereof may be observed and fulfilled with good aith by the United States and the citizens thereof, subject to the said understanding of the Senate of the United States. In testimony whereof. I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be ailixed. Done at the (`ity of l"3lSlllll§!ii()H this twenty-fifth day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and [sur,.] seventeen. and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and forty-first. WVoonaow \Vu.soN By the President: Ronmrr Laxsixc. Secretary of State. DECLARATION. D°°"“"’"°°· In proceeding this day to the signature of the Convention respect- G§$§§d“}‘§§§§’,§§%f ing the cession of the Danish XVest-Indian Islands to the United States of America, the undersigned Secretary of State of the United States of America, duly authorized by his Government, has the honor to declare that the Government of the United States of America will not object to the Danish Government extending their political and economic interests to the whole of Greenland. " Roemrr Laxsixc. New York, August 4, 1916. 102620°—voL 39-rr 2————34