Page:VCH Surrey 1.djvu/363

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THE HOLDERS OF LANDS another church * in the same place, which renders 12 shillings by the year. These 3 hides, in the time of king Edward, and now, (were and) are worth 4 pounds ; when he received them, 3 pounds. The same Randulf holds of the King TIWESLE [Tuesley]. It belonged to Godel- minge (Godalming). Lewin held it of king Edward. Then, and now, (it was and is) I hide. It has never paid geld. The land is for i plough, and it is there, with I villein and 6 cottars and I serf. In the time of king Edward it was worth 60 shillings ; and after- wards, and now, 40 shillings. In AMELEBRIGE [Emleybridge] Aldi, a cer- tain woman, holds of the King I virgate. It is worth three shillings. THE LAND OF THE ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY IN WALETONE [WALLINGTON] HUNDRED II. Archbishop Lanfranc holds in demesne CROINDENE [Croydon].* In the time of king Edward it was assessed for 80 hides, and now for 1 6 hides and I virgate. The land is for 2O ploughs. In demesne there are 4 ploughs ; and (there are) 48 villeins and 25 bordars with 34 ploughs. There is a church ; and a mill worth 5 shillings ; and 8 acres of meadow. Wood worth 200 hogs. Of the land of this manor, Restold holds 7 hides of the Archbishop. Ralph (holds) i hide ; and they have therefrom 7 pounds and 8 shillings for rent (gablo). In the time of king Edward, and afterwards, the whole was worth 12 pounds; now 27 pounds to the Archbishop (and) 10 pounds and 10 shillings to his homagers. The Archbishop himself holds CEIHAM [Cheam] 8 for the sustenance of the monks. 1 In I22O there was still a record (in a Visitation) of another church, with a grave- yard, dedicated to the Virgin, near Tuesley, not even then standing. The foundations have been lately found.

  • Croydon parish was a peculiar of the

See of Canterbury. This is one of the two places in Wallington Hundred where bordars appear. (See above, on Wallington.) 8 Cheam parish was a peculiar of the See of Canterbury. The Church was dedicated to St. Dunstan. In the time of king Edward it was assessed for 20 hides, and now for 4 hides. The land is for 14 ploughs. In demesne there are 2 ploughs ; and (there are) 25 villeins and 12 cottars with 15 ploughs. There is a church ; and 5 serfs, and i acre of meadow. Wood worth 25 hogs. In the time of king Edward, and afterwards, it was worth 8 pounds ; now 1 4 pounds. IN BRIXIESTAN [BRIXTON] HUNDRED The Archbishop himself holds in demesne MORTELAGE [Mortlake].* In the time of king Edward it was assessed for 80 hides. The Canons of St. Paul's (Church) hold 8 of these hides, which have paid, and do pay, geld with the rest (cum his) . 6 Now they pay geld for 25 hides altogether. The land is for 35 ploughs. In demesne there are 5 ploughs ; and (there are) 80 villeins and 14 bordars with 28 ploughs. There is a church ; and 1 6 serfs ; and 2 mills worth I OO shillings ; and 2O acres of meadow. From the wood, 55 hogs from the pannage. In London there were 17 houses rendering 52 pence. In Sudwerca [Southwark] 4 houses worth 27 pence ; and 20 shillings from the toll 6 of the vill of Putelei [Putney], and [there is] a fishery unrented (sine censu). Earl Harold had this fishery in Mortelaga p. 313, col. i. [Mortlake] in the time ot king Edward, and archbishop Stigand had it a long while in the time of king William ; and yet they (the jurors) say that Harold set it up by force in the time of king Edward in the land of Chingestune [Kingston] and in the land of St. Paul's (Church). 7 The whole manor, in the time of king Edward, was worth 32 pounds, and afterwards 10 pounds ; now 38 pounds. Bainiard holds of the Archbishop WALE- ORDE [Wai worth]. 8 In the time of king Edward it was for the clothing of the monks. It was then assessed for 5 hides ; now for 3^ hides. The land is for 3 ploughs. In demesne there is one plough ; and (there are) 14 villeins and 5 bordars with 3 ploughs. There is a church ; and 8 acres of meadow. In the time of king Edward it was worth 4 In Barnes parish, a peculiar of the See of Canterbury. 5 These hides are surveyed below (p. 312) as St. Paul's manor of Barnes (J. H, R.). 6 Toll for a market or a ferry. 7 i.e. Barnes. 8 Walworth parish was la peculiar of the See of Canterbury. 299