Page:VCH Surrey 1.djvu/364

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A HISTORY OF SURREY 30 shillings, and afterwards 2O shillings ; now 60 shillings. IN CHERCHEFELLE (REIGATE) HUNDRED The Archbishop himself holds MERSTAN [Merstham] J for the clothing of the monks. In the time of king Edward it was assessed for 2O hides ; now for 5 hides. The land is for 8 ploughs. In demesne there are 2 ploughs ; and (there are) 21 villeins and 4 bordars with 8 ploughs. There is a church ; and a mill worth 30 pence ; and 8 serfs ; and 8 acres of meadow. Wood worth 25 hogs. For the herbage 16 hogs. In the time of king Edward it was worth 8 pounds, and afterwards 4 pounds ; now 1 2 pounds. IN WOCHINGES [WOKING] HUNDRED The Archbishop himself holds HORSLEI [East Horsley] 8 for the sustenance of the monks. In the time of king Edward it was assessed for 14 hides ; now for 3 hides and

  • i virgates. The land is for 5 ploughs. In

demesne there is I ; and (there are) 13 villeins and 6 bordars with 7^ ploughs. There are 3 serfs. Wood worth 50 hogs. In the time of king Edward it was worth 4 pounds, and afterwards in like manner ; now (it is worth) as much, and yet it renders 100 shillings. THE LAND OF THE BISHOP OF WINCHESTER 3 III. THE BISHOP of Winchester holds FERNEHAM [Farnham]. Saint Peter * always held it. In the time of king Edward it was assessed for 60 hides, and now for 40 hides. The land is .* In demesne there are 5 ploughs ; and (there are) 36 villeins and 1 1 bordars with 29 ploughs. There are 1 1 serfs ; and 6 mills worth 46 shillings and 4 pence ; and 35 acres of meadow. Wood worth 150^ hogs from the pannage. Of the 1 Merstham parish was a peculiar of the See of Canterbury. a East Horsley parish was a peculiar of the See of Canterbury. This manor was the Archbishop's manor, as distinguished from the Bishop's manor (of Exeter). See note 9 below. 3 What is now known as Farnham Hun- dred.

  • The 4 Old Minster' (i.e. the Cathedral)

at Winchester. 6 A blank in the MS. land of this manor Ralph holds of the Bishop 4 hides less i virgate. William (holds) 3 hides and i virgate. Wazo (holds) half a hide. In these lands (there are) 3 ploughs in demesne ; and (there are) 22 villeins and 9 bordars with 6 ploughs. Wood for 25 hogs. In the time of king Edward the manor, so far as it lies in Surrey, 8 was worth 55 pounds; when he received it, 30 pounds. Now the demesne of the Bishop (is worth) 38 pounds ; (the land) of his homagers 9 pounds. Osbern de Ow holds the church of this manor of the Bishop. It is worth 6 pounds, with i hide, which he has in HANTESIRA (Hampshire) 7 . THE LAND OF BISHOP OSBERN 8 IN WOCHINGES [WOKING] HUNDRED IV. BISHOP OSBERN holds WOCHINGES [Woking]. 9 He held it in the time of king Edward and it was then assessed for 8 hides ; now for 3^ hides. The land is for 9^ ploughs. In demesne (there are) i ploughs ; and (there are) 20 villeins and 6 bordars with 8^ ploughs. There are 3 serfs ; and a mill worth 30 pence ; and 14 acres of meadow. Wood worth 28 hogs. p. 313, col. II. This manor has, and had, a customary right in the King's wood of WOCHINGES (Woking) ; it is this : that the lord of this vill 10 can have in the same wood 120 hogs without (pay- ment for) pannage. Two homagers, Ansgot and Godfrey, hold this manor of the Bishop ; each (holds) 4 hides. The whole, in the time of king Edward, and afterwards, was worth 10 pounds, now 9 pounds and 10 shillings. The Bishop himself holds TETINGES (Tit- ing]. 11 Elmer the huntsman held it in the time of king Edward. It was then assessed for 6 Part of the manor was in Hampshire. 7 See Introduction. 8 The Bishop of Exeter. 9 There is reason for suspecting that this means what was called the Bishop's manor, in East Horsley, belonging to the See of Exeter down to Edward the Sixth's reign. Horsley is in Woking Hundred, and there seems to be no record of the See of Exeter holding land in Woking itself. The Bishop's manor in East Horsley is only about 4 miles from Woking. 10 ' Dominus villae ' is an unusual and note- worthy phrase in Domesday (J. H. R.). 11 Tiling belonged to the See of Exeter till 1549. It has been, time out of mind, in Blackheath Hundred. 300