Page:VCH Surrey 1.djvu/387

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THE HOLDERS OF LANDS with 6 ploughs. There are 7 serfs ; and 7 acres of meadow. There is a church. In the time of king Edward it was worth 8 pounds, and afterwards 6 pounds ; now 9 pounds. Tezelin holds of Walter HORMERA [Hurtmore 1 in Godalming]. Alwin held it of king Edward. It was then assessed for 15 hides ; now for 3 hides. The land is for 3 ploughs. In demesne there are 2 ploughs ; and (there are) 3 villeins and 2 cottars with i^ 'ploughs. There is I mill worth n shil- lings ; and 6 acres of meadow. In the time of king Edward it was worth 50 shillings, afterwards 30 shillings; now 100 shillings. The selfsame Walter, and Girard under him, holds PIPEREHERGE [Peperharow]. 2 Alward held it of king Edward. It was then assessed for 5 hides; now for 3 hides. The land is for 3 ploughs. In demesne there are 2 ploughs ; and a mill worth 7 shillings ; and 15 acres of meadow. There are 4 villeins and 3 cottars with i plough. In the time of king Edward, and afterwards, it was worth 30 shillings; now 100 shillings. IN CHINGESTUN [KINGSTON] HUNDRED Walter himself holds one man of the soke of CHINGESTUN [Kingston], to whom he has committed the charge of the King's brood (silvaticas) 3 mares, but we know not on what terms (nescimus quomodo). This man holds 2 hides, but he has no right in the land itself (nan habet rectum in ipsa terra).* It was assessed for 2 hides ; now for nothing. There is I plough in demesne, with 3 serfs ; and I fishery worth 125 eels ; and I acre of meadow. It is, and always was, worth 30 shillings. Walter son of Other holds ORSELEI [West Horsley]. 6 Brixi held it of king Edward. 1 Hurtmore is a tithing of Godalming parish. It was, as a manor, granted by Thomas de Hertmere to Newark Abbey, Surrey, to be held of William de Wyndesore, some time subsequent to the accession of Richard I. See Inspeximus of charters quoted by Dugdale.

  • In Testa de Nevill Peperharow is held of

the Honour of Windsor. 3 Silvaticas, sc. ' Unbroken,' therefore only kept for breeding. 4 He is only there as keeper of the mares. 6 West Horsley, belonging later to De Windsor. This entry is out of place, and is 323 It was then assessed for 10 hides ; now for 8 hides. The land is for 6 ploughs ; in demesne there are 2 ploughs ; and (there are) 14 villeins and 5 bordars with 5 ploughs. There is a church ; and 8 serfs. Wood worth 20 hogs. In the time of king Edward it was worth 8 pounds, afterwards i OO shillings ; now 6 pounds. Of this land, an Englishman holds i hide ; and he has i plough there with i bordar. It is worth 20 shillings. THE LAND OF WALTER DE DOWAI IN WALETON [WALLINGTON] HUNDRED XXIII. Walter de Doai holds two hides of the King, as he says. But the men of the Hundred say that they have never seen the King's writ or commissioner (nuncium) who had given him seisin thereof. But this they testify, that a certain free man holding this land, and able to put himself under any lord he pleased (quo vellet abire valens), committed himself to Walter's guardianship for his own protection. This land is, and was, worth 20 shillings. THE LAND OF GILBERT SON OF RICHER p 36, a. ii. XXIV. Gilbert son of Richer de Laigle (d'Aigle) holds WITLEI [Witley]. 6 Earl God- wine held it. It was then assessed for 2O hides; now for 12 hides. The land is for 16 ploughs. In demesne there are 2 ploughs ; and (there are) 37 villeins and 3 cottars with 13 ploughs. There is a church ; and 3 acres of meadow. Wood worth 30 hogs. In the time of king Edward, and afterwards, it was worth 1 5 pounds ; now 1 6 pounds. THE LAND OF GEOFFREY DE MANDEVILLE IN BRIXISTAN [BRIXTON] HUNDRED XXV. Geoffrey de Mandeville holds CLOPE- HAM [Clapham]. Turbern held it of king Edward. It was then assessed for 10 hides; now for 3 hides. The land is for 7 ploughs. In demesne there is one plough ; and (there are) 8 villeins and 3 bordars, with 5 ploughs. indicated by a note in the original as belong- ing to the previous column. 6 In 1235 Witley was part of the Terra Normannorum, which had been held by Gilbert de Aquila, and was then in the hands of the Earl Marshal. (Red Book of the Exchequer.')