Page:VCH Surrey 1.djvu/389

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THE HOLDERS OF LANDS sis) holds WALETONE [Walton-on-Thames]. 1 Azor held it of king Edward. It was then assessed for 6 hides ; now for 3 hides. The land is for 8 ploughs. In demesne there are 2 ploughs ; and (there are) 8 villeins and 3 cottars with 7 ploughs. There are 8 serfs ; and a mill worth 1 2 shillings and 6 pence ; and 40 acres of meadow. Wood worth 50 hogs. There is a forester, of 10 shillings (rent). In the time of king Edward it was worth 8 pounds, afterwards 100 shillings; now 12 pounds; yet it yields 14 pounds. IN GODELMINGE [GoDALMING] HUNDRED Randulf holds of Edward HAMELEDUNE [Hambledon]. 8 Azor held it of king Ed- ward. It was then assessed for 5 hides ; now for 3 hides. The land is for 4 ploughs. In demesne there are 2 ploughs ; and (there are) 8 villeins and i cottar with 5 ploughs. There are 1 3 serfs ; and a mill worth 30 pence ; and 3 acres of meadow. Wood worth 30 hogs. It is worth, and always was worth, 100 shillings. IN WOCHINGES [WoKING] HUNDRED Hugh holds of Edward CLANEDUN [West Clandon]. 3 Fulcui held it in the time of king Edward. It was then assessed for 5 hides ; now for 2 hides. The land is for 3 ploughs. In demesne there is i ; and (there are) 4 villeins and 5 bordars with i^ ploughs. (There is) a mill worth 3 shillings. There is a church ; and wood worth 5 hogs. It was worth 50 shillings ; now 60 shillings. THE LAND OF ROBERT MALET p. 36, b. i. IN WOCHINGES [WOKING] HUNDRED XXVIII. Robert Malet holds SUDTUNE [Sutton]. 4 Wenesi held it of king Edward. It was then assessed for 5 hides ; now for 3 hides. The land is for three ploughs. In demesne there is i ; and (there are) 5 villeins and 5 bordars with 2 ploughs. There are 6 serfs ; and a mill worth 5 shillings ; and 2O acres of 1 Walton-on-Thames. It passed with Edward's daughter to the De Bohuns, and this manor was De Bohun property later.

  • Held later of the Honour of Salisbury.

3 Probably West Clandon, called Clandon Regis, but not known to be a royal manor. It is not East Clandon, which was Clandon Abbatis, and belonged to Chertsey. 4 Sutton, near Guildford. 325 meadow. Wood worth 25 hogs. In the time of king Edward, and afterwards, it was worth 8 pounds; now 100 shillings. Durand has taken seisin of this land, and the men say that he has it wrongfully, for no one of them has seen the King's writ or livery officer. THE LAND OF MILES CRISPIN IN WALETON [WALUNGTON] HUNDRED XXIX. Miles Crispin holds BEDDINTONE [Beddington] ; B and William son of Turold (holds it) of him. Ulf held it of king Edward. It was then assessed for 25 hides; now for 3 hides. The land is for 6 ploughs. In demesne there is i plough ; and (there are) 13 villeins and 13 cottars with 6 ploughs. There is i serf ; and two mills worth 35 shillings ; and 20 acres of meadow. Wood worth 5 hogs. In the time of king Edward it was worth 10 pounds, afterwards 6 pounds ; now 9 pounds and 10 shillings. From this manor (an erasure in the original') have been taken 21 houses which Roger the Earl holds, 13 in London, 8 in Sudwerche [Southwark]. They yield 12 shillings. Miles himself holds CISEDUNE [Chessing- ton]. 6 Magno Suert held it in the time of king Edward. It was then assessed for 5 hides ; now for I hide. When king William came into England, Wigot 7 was not holding it. The land is for 3 ploughs. This land used to belong to (iacebat in) Beddinton [Bed- dington]. Villeins used to hold it. In de- mesne there is now I plough ; and (there are) 6 villeins with 2 ploughs. In the time of king Edward it was worth 4 pounds, after- wards 40 shillings ; now 70 shillings. THE LAND OF HAIMO THE SHERIFF IN TENRIGE [TANDRIDGE] HUNDRED XXX. Haimo the sheriff holds TICESEI 6 Beddington Huscarle. It took its name from Roland Huscarl, a tenant of the Honour of Wallingford under John, or from one of his family (J. H. R.). See 34, b. 2 for the other Beddington. 6 Chessington, probably. Since reckoned in Copthorne Hundred. 7 Wigod of Wallingford, an Englishman, made his peace at once with king William. He was probably father-in-law to Miles Crispin, who seems to have claimed it un- warrantably as heir to Wigod (see p. 284).