The American Fugitive in Europe

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THE AMERICAN FUGITIVE IN EUROPE.


 

The American Fugitive in Europe, frontispiece.jpg


THE AMERICAN FUGITIVE IN EUROPE.



SKETCHES

OF

PLACES AND PEOPLE ABROAD.


BY

WM. WELLS BROWN.


WITH

A MEMOIR OF THE AUTHOR.



"Go, little book, from this my solitude!
I cast thee on the waters—go thy ways!
And if, as I believe, thy vein be good,
The world will find thee after many days."



BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY JOHN P. JEWETT AND COMPANY.
CLEVELAND, OHIO:
JEWETT, PROCTOR & WORTHINGTON
NEW YORK:
SHELDON, LAMPORT & BLAKEMAN.
1855.

 

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1854, by
JOHN P JEWETT & CO.,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

 

Stereotyped by
HOBART & ROBBINS,
New England Type and Stereotype Foundry,
BOSTON.

PREFACE

to the english edition.


While I feel conscious that most of the contents of these Letters will be interesting chiefly to American readers, yet I may indulge the hope that the fact of their being the first production of a Fugitive Slave as a history of travels may carry with them novelty enough to secure for them, to some extent, the attention of the reading public of Great Britain. Most of the letters were written for the private perusal of a few personal friends in America; some were contributed to Frederick Douglass' Paper, a journal published in the United States. In a printed circular sent some weeks since to some of my friends, asking subscriptions to this volume, I stated the reasons for its publication: these need not be repeated here. To those who so promptly and kindly responded to that appeal, I tender my most sincere thanks. It is with no little diffidence that I lay these letters before the public; for I am not blind to the fact that they must contain many errors; and to those who shall find fault with them on that account, it may not be too much for me to ask them kindly to remember that the author was a slave in one of the Southern States of America until he had attained the age of twenty years; and that the education he has acquired was by his own exertions, he never having had a day's schooling in his life.

22 Cecil Street, Strand, London.



NOTE

to the american edition.


During my sojourn abroad I found it advantageous to my purse to publish a book of travels, which I did under the title of "Three Years in Europe, or Places I have seen and People I have met." The work was reviewed by the ablest journals in Great Britain, and from their favorable criticisms I have been induced to offer it to the American public, with a dozen or more additional chapters.W. W. B. Boston, November, 1851.

CONTENTS.




PAGE
Memoir of the Author 9
CHAPTER I.
Departure from Boston—The Passengers—Halifax—The Passage—First Sight of Land—Liverpool 35
CHAPTER II.
Trip to Ireland—Dublin—Her Majesty's Visit—Illumination of the City—The Birthplace of Thomas Moore—A Reception 42
CHAPTER III.
Departure from Ireland—London—Trip to Paris—Paris—The Peace Congress: First Day—Church of the Madeleine—Column Vendome—The French 51
CHAPTER IV.
Versailles—The Palace—Second Session of the Congress—Mr. Cobden—Henry Vincent—M. Girardin—Abbe Duguerry—Victor Hugo: his Speech 64
CHAPTER V.
M. de Tocqueville's Grand Soiree—Madame de Tocqueville—Visit of the Peace Delegates to Versailles—The Breakfast—Speech-making—The Trianons—Waterworks—St. Cloud—The Féte 73
CHAPTER VI.
The Tuileries—Place de la Concorde—The Egyptian Obelisk—Palais Royal—Residence of Robespierre—A Visit to the Room in which Charlotte Corday killed Marat—Church de Notre Dame—Palais de Justice—Hotel des Invalides—National Assembly—The Elysee 80
CHAPTER VII.
The Chateau at Versailles—Private Apartments of Marie Antoinette—The Secret Door—Paintings of Raphael and David—Arc de Triomphe—Beranger the Poet 91
CHAPTER VIII.
Departure from Paris—Boulogne—Folkstone—London—George Thompson, Esq., M.P.—Hartwell House—Dr. Lee—Cottage of the Peasant—Windsor Castle—Residence of William Penn—England's First Welcome—Heath Lodge—The Bank of England 95
CHAPTER IX.
The British Museum—A Portrait—Night Reading—A Dark Day—A Fugitive Slave on the Streets of London—A Friend in the Time of Need 113
CHAPTER X.
The Whittington Club—Louis Blanc—Street Amusements—Tower of London—Westminster Abbey—National Gallery—Dante—Sir Joshua Reynolds 123
CHAPTER XI.
York Minster—The Great Organ—Newcastle-on-Tyne—The Laboring Classes—The American Slave—Sheffield—James Montgomery 136
CHAPTER XII.
Kirkstall Abbey—Mary the Maid of the Inn—Newstead Abbey: Residence of Lord Byron—Parish Church of Hucknall—Burial-place of Lord Byron 145
CHAPTER XIII.
Bristol: "Cook's Folly"—Chepstow Castle and Abbey—Tintern Abbey—Redcliffe Church—Edinburgh—The Royal institute—Scott's Monument—John Knox's Pulpit—Meetings in City Hall, Glasgow 154
CHAPTER XIV.
Stirling—Dundee—Dr. Dick—George Gilfillan, the Essayist—Dr. Dick at home 167
CHAPTER XV.
Melrose Abbey—Abbotsford—Dryburgh Abbey—The Grave of Sir Walter Scott—Hawick—Gretna Green—Visit to the Lakes 173
CHAPTER XVI.
Miss Martineau—"The Knoll"—"Rydal Mount"—"The Dove's Nest"—Grave of William Wordsworth, Esq.—The English Peasant 182
CHAPTER XVII.
A Day in the Crystal Palace—Thomas Carlyle 193
CHAPTER XVIII.
The London Peace Congress—Meeting of Fugitive Slaves—Temperance Demonstration—The Great Exhibition: Last Visit 202
CHAPTER XIX.
Oxford—Martyrs' Monument—Cost of the Burning of the Martyrs—The Colleges—Dr. Pusey—Energy the Secret of Success 208
CHAPTER XX.
Fugitive Slaves in England—Great Meeting in Hall of Commerce, London 215
CHAPTER XXI.
Visit to Stratford upon Avon—Shakspeare's Birth-place—His Grave—George Dawson, Esq. 220
CHAPTER XXII.
Visit to Ludlow—The Wet Sheets—Landlady in a Fix—Ludlow Castle—Milton's Comus—Butler's Hudibras—Visit to Hereford—Birth-places of Garrick, Mrs. Siddons, Nell Gwynne 230
CHAPTER XXIII.
A Fashionable Dinner Party—Cowley, the Poet—Residence of Alexander Pope—His Merits as a Poet 240
CHAPTER XXIV.
Birth-place of Robert Burns—His Monument—Tain O'Shanter and Souter Johnny—The Shell Palace—Newark Castle—Highland Mary 247
CHAPTER XXV.
The Thames Tunnel—Colosseum—Swiss Cottage—Its Mysteries and its Beauties 251
CHAPTER XXVI.
Visit to a Burial-ground—Epitaph on the Grave of a Wife—A Warning to the Fair Sex 259
CHAPTER XXVII.
Scotland—Aberdeen—Passage by Water—Edinburgh—George Combe 262
CHAPTER XXVIII.
Joseph Jenkins, the African Genius—His Street-sweeping—Bill-distributing—Psalm-singing—Othello—And Iris Preaching 268
CHAPTER XXIX.
Monument to Thomas Hood—Eliza Cook—Murdo Young—Milnes, the Poet 276
CHAPTER XXX.
A Night in the House of Commons—A Bird's-eye View of its Members—Hastie, Layard, Hume, the Father of the House, Edward Miall, W. J. Fox, Macaulay, Richard Cobden, Gladstone the Orator, Disraeli the Jew, Lord Dudley Stuart, Lord John Russell—A Debate in the House—People in the Gallery—Sir Edward Bulwer Lytton 282
CHAPTER XXXI.
Anniversary of West India Emancipation—Francis W. Kellogg—British Hatred of Oppression—A Singular Recognition—Lady Noel Byron and Ellen Craft 296
CHAPTER XXXII.
Thoughts on leaving for America—Acquaintances made in Great Britain—John Bishop Estlin—Departure in the Steamer "City of Manchester"—Peculiarities of Passengers—Irish, Germans, and Gypsies—Reception at Philadelphia—Anti-Christian Prejudices there—Design in Returning—Reflections 303


This work was published before January 1, 1925, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.