The Birds (Blake, Notebook)

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For works with similar titles, see Birds.
Blake manuscript - Notebook 1800 - 10 The Birds

1st reading: [1][edit]

THE BIRDS.

He.Where thou dwellest, in what grove,
Tell me, fair one, tell me, love,
Where thou thy charming nest dost build,
O thou pride of every field!


She.Yonder stands a lonely tree,
There I live and mourn for thee;
Morning drinks my silent tear,
And evening winds my sorrow bear.


He.O thou summer's harmony,
have lived and mourned for thee;
Each day I mourn along the wood,
And night hath heard my sorrows loud.


She.Dost thou truly long for me?
And am I thus sweet to thee
Sorrow now is at an end,
O my lover and my friend!


He.Come! on wings of joy we'll fly
To where my bower is hung on high;
Come, and make thy calm retreat
Among green leaves and blossoms sweet.


_______________________________________


2nd reading: [2][edit]

The Birds

He.Where thou dwellest, in what Grove,
Tell me, Fair one, tell me, love;
Where thou thy charming Nest dost build,
O thou pride of every field!


She.Yonder stands a lonely tree,
There I live and mourn for thee,
Morning drinks my silent tear,
And evening winds my sorrow bear.


He.O thou Summer's harmony,
have liv'd & mourn'd for thee;
Each day I mourn along the wood,
And night hath heard my sorrows loud.


She.Dost thou truly long for me?
And am I thus sweet to thee?
Sorrow now is at an End,
O my lover & my Friend!


He.Come! on wings of joy we'll fly
To where my Bower is hung on high!
Come, & make thy calm retreat
Among green leaves and blossoms sweet!

_______________________________________

  1. Life of William Blake (1880), Volume 2, William Blake, Anne Gilchrist, Alexander Gilchrist, Dante Gabriel Rossetti
  2. "Blake Complete Writings", ed. Geoffrey Keynes, pub. OUP 1966/85, p. 422-3.

This work was published before January 1, 1925, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.