The Cougar Hunt

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The Cougar Hunt  (c. 1920) 
by Raymond Evans
A silent educational film detailing the hunting of cougars that kill the livestock of farmers
Key (info)
Dialogue
In scene
Storyline


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT of AGRICULTURE



THE
COUGAR HUNT




A BIOLOGICAL SURVEY PICTURE

Subject Matter ~ Stanley P. Young

Direction
RAYMOND EVANS

Camera
EUGENE TUCKER





EDUCATIONAL FILM SERVICE

Predators of the range–

Uncontrolled Predators exact a heavy annual toll of livestock and game––

––often presenting a staggering problem to the Western stockman and game conservationist.

Flocks and herds are a major factor in the wealth of the Mountain States.

Tribute paid to the Predators cuts the rancher's profit.

The individual rancher can't cope with the roving Predator–

MOUNTAIN RANCH
RANGER STATION
ELEV. 7000

FOREST SERVICE
U S
DEPT. OF AGR.
U.S. DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE

BUREAU
OF
BIOLOGICAL SURVEY

PREDATORY ANIMAL CONTROL
GEO. E. HOLMAN

ENTRANCE

Uncle Sam takes a hand.

WESTERN UNION
TELEGRAM

SALT LAKE CITY UTAH
SEPTEMBER 18 1920


ALVIN SORENSON
SALINA UTAH

WINCH REPORTS LOSS TWELVE SHEEP LAST NIGHT STOP MEET ME MOUTH SPRING CANYON THREE P M TOMORROW WITH HORSES AND CAMP
HOLMAN
TELEGRAM
PREPAID
GOVERNMENT RATE

Predatory animal control is effected by cooperative campaigns in which trained hunters and trappers are employed.

The work of that prince of predatory cats––the American lion, or cougar.

The campaign opens.

A line of traps is set. This is for coyotes–

Traps are also used for lions, lynxes, and bobcats. This is for lions.

The hunt—

Lion hunting is hazardous. Often two or more crews work together.

This is lion country–

More lion country–

Find the lion!

Somewhere in this vast wilderness runs the trail of the fugitive cougar.

Enters now the traditional enemy of the Predator–

These are strictly "lion dogs", trained to trail the cougar exclusively.

More work of mountain lions.

A warm trail–

Even the warmest trail may be long–when the game is old Felis concolor.

A hot trail!

The trained hound knows his lion tracks!

Here he goes!

Treed!

The trail ends.

A "good" lion at last–

No more will these sharp claws and fangs tear the throat of calf, or lamb, or fawn.

Often the story has a less tragical ending–

Here the fugitive is taken alive–to spend the remainder of his days in the "Zoo".

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1926. It may be copyrighted outside the U.S. (see Help:Public domain).

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).