The Encyclopedia Americana (1920)/Zephyrus

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The Encyclopedia Americana
Zephyrus
Edition of 1920. See also Zephyrus on Wikipedia, and the disclaimer.

ZEPHYRUS, zĕf'ĭ-rŭs, in Greek mythology, the god of the west-wind, a son of Æolus, or of Astræus and of Aurora. He was married to Chloris, goddess of fruits and flowers, their son being Carpus, god of fruit. By the harpy Podarge he was the sire of the swift horses of Achilles, Xanthos and Balios. His love being rejected by Hyacinthus, he was the cause of his death by blowing Apollo's quoit against his head. Some make him the husband of one of the Hours. Flowers and fruits are under his protection. He is represented as a gentle beautiful youth, naked, with a wreath on his head or flowers in the fold of his mantle. According to Horner he was brother to Boreas, with whom he lived in a palace in Thrace. The Romans identified him as Favonius, and his wife, Chlris, as Flora.