The Golden Age

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THE GOLDEN AGE


COMPANION VOLUME TO THIS BOOK


DREAM DAYS


BY

KENNETH GRAHAME


PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED BY MAXFIELD PARRISH


Frontispiece to The golden age.png


Onto the garden wall, which led in its turn to the roof of an outhouse


'The Golden Age'


Title illustration to The golden age.png


Copyright, 1899

BY JOHN LANE


Copyright, 1904

BY JOHN LANE


CONTENTS


  PAGE
PROLOGUE: THE OLYMPIANS 3
A HOLIDAY 13
A WHITE-WASHED UNCLE 29
ALARUMS AND EXCURSIONS 39
THE FINDING OF THE PRINCESS 53
SAWDUST AND SIN 67
'YOUNG ADAM CUPID' 79
THE BURGLARS 93
A HARVESTING 107
SNOWBOUND 121
WHAT THEY TALKED ABOUT 133
THE ARGONAUTS 143
THE ROMAN ROAD 161
THE SECRET DRAWER 179
'EXIT TYRANNUS' 193
THE BLUE ROOM 205
A FALLING OUT 225
'LUSISTI SATIS' 239


PUBLISHER'S NOTE


The publication of this new edition of "The Golden Age," the favourite amongst Mr. Kenneth Grahame's favoured books, with the illustrations by Mr. Maxfield Parrish reproduced in photogravure, was accomplished through the kindness of the various owners, who gave access to the originals in their respective collections. The publisher begs gratefully to acknowledge this courtesy, with special thanks also to Mr. Frederick Keppel and Mr, Fitzroy Carrington for their kind co-operation.


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

    PAGE
'Onto the garden wall, which led in its turn to the roof of an outhouse'   Frontispiece
'The Golden Age'   Title
'For them the orchard (a place elf-haunted, wonderful!) simply' Facing 6
'Out into the brimming sun-bathed world I sped' 14
'"I took the old fellow to the station"' 34
'Once more were damsels rescued, dragons disembowelled, and giants' 42
'Lulled by the trickle of water, I slipped into dreamland' 62
'It was easy … to transport yourself in a trice to the heart of a tropical forest' 68
'Who would have thought … that only two short days ago we had confronted each other on either side of a hedge' 86
'A great book open on his knee … a score or so disposed within easy reach' 114
'But yester-eve and the mummers were here!' 122
'"They make me walk behind, 'cos they say I'm too little, and mustn't hear"' 138
'"I'm Jason … and this is the Argo … and we're just going through the Hellespont"' 146
'"You haven't been to Rome, have you?"' 166
'I drew it out and carried it to the window, to examine it in the failing light' 188
'At breakfast Miss Smedley behaved in a most mean and uncalled-for manner' 196
'The procession passing solemnly across the moon-lit Blue Room' 218
'"Why, Master Harold! whatever be the matter? Baint runnin' away, be ee?"' 232
'Finally we found ourselves sitting silent on an upturned wheelbarrow' 250