The Golden Violet with its Tales of Romance and Chivalry and Other Poems

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Golden Violet Frontispiece.png

C. C. Pyne del. E. J. Portbury sculp.

And beneath was piled up mound of stones
  Whence a rude grey cross arose
'And lo' said the ancient servitor
  'It is here thy father is laid.'
Ballad of Sir Walter Manny p.230

Published by Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown & Green, Dec. 11 1826

THE

GOLDEN VIOLET,

WITH

ITS TALES OF

ROMANCE AND CHIVALRY:

AND

OTHER POEMS.




By L. E. L.

AUTHOR OF "THE IMPROVISATRICE," "THE
TROUBADOUR," ETC.




LONDON:

PRINTED FOR
LONGMAN, REES, ORME, BROWN AND GREEN,
PATERNOSTER-ROW,

1827.








London:
Printed by A. & H. Spottiswoode,
New-Street-Square.


TO


THE REV. JAMES LANDON,

RECTOR OF ABERFORD AND AMESTRY.


My dear Uncle,

I inscribe to you this volume, the greater part of which was written under your affectionate roof, during the two pleasant seasons I have past with you. To have it deemed worthy of your critical judgement, and your more partial approval, would indeed be the pride and pleasure of


Your gratefully attached

L. E. L.
December 1826.


INTRODUCTION.




The title of the Golden Violet is taken from the Festival alluded to in the close of the Troubadour. There are various accounts of the origin of this metrical composition: the one from which my idea was principally taken is that mentioned by Warton.