The Siege of London (Posteritas)

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The Siege of London  (1885) 
by Posteritas

THE

SIEGE OF LONDON.

BY
"POSTERITAS."

Symmetrical fleuron

LONDON:
WYMAN & SONS, GREAT QUEEN STREET,
LINCOLN'S-INN FIELDS.
1885.

WYMAN AND SONS, PRINTERS,
GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S-INN FIELDS,
LONDON, W.C.

CONTENTS.
CHAPTER I.
England's Political Mistakes.—The Egyptian Muddle.—Alarming Signs in the Foreign Political Sky 1

CHAPTER II.

Introduction of a new Reform Bill.—Conflict with the House of Lords.—Concessions by Mr. Gladstone.—A Revolutionary Spirit displays itself in Ireland.—Insolence of France.—Fall of the Gladstone Government.—Return of the Conservatives to Power.—The Conversion of Birmingham 7

CHAPTER III.

Sir Stafford Northcote becomes Prime Minister.—Resolute Policy of the New Government.—Despatch of a large Force to South Africa, under Lord Wolseley.—Great Defeat of the English.—More Troops sent out, and ultimate Defeat of the Boers.—Tactics of the "Separatists" and the Radicals.—Disgraceful Scenes in the House of Commons.—Weakness of the British Navy.—The Egyptian Trouble looms large again.—Irritation of France.—Fall of the Conservative Government 13

CHAPTER IV.

The Liberals come into Power once more.—War Feeling displays itself in France against England.—The Weakness of the British Navy is still a source of anxiety, but the People are deceived by the Radicals.—French Demands.—French Ultimatum.—French Declaration of War 21

CHAPTER V.

England prepares for War.—Great Activity throughout the Country.—A Rising planned in Ireland.—Despatch of Troops there.—Weakness of the British Army.—Great Naval Battle off the Bristol Channel.—Victory for the English Fleet.—News arrives that the Russians are Marching on India.—Outbreak of popular Fury.—Revolt in Ireland.—Landing of French Troops in Sutherlandshire 26

CHAPTER VI.

Great Riot in London.—Collision between the Troops and the People.—Destruction of Monuments of Mr. Gladstone.—Terrible Slaughter.—Terrific Naval Battle at Plymouth.—The French Ironclads beaten off with great Loss.—Plymouth partly destroyed.—Great Naval Attack on Dover.—Explosion of the Magazine through Fenian Treachery.—Disablement of the Eighty-ton Gun on the Admiralty Pier.—Landing of a French Force 32

CHAPTER VII.

Exasperation of the English People against their Rulers.—Stern Resolve to Oppose the Enemy.—Great Suffering amongst the Poor.—Fabulous Price of Meat and Bread.—More Riots and Destruction of Property 38

CHAPTER VIII.

The Composition of the Armies of the Northern Invaders.—Loyalty and Gallantry of the Highlanders.—Arrival of more French Troops.—Failure of the Attempt to Defeat their Landing.—The French attacked by Townspeople.—Extraordinary Scenes.—Fort George taken.—The French move Southward.—Attack on Stirling Castle.—Gallant Defence.—Defeat of the English, who fall back on Edinburgh 41

CHAPTER IX.

Concentration of Troops in Edinburgh.—Panic amongst the Citizens.—Tremendous Battle on the Union Canal.—Conduct of the Zouaves.—The English forced to Retreat.—Determined Defence and Blowing up of the Castle.—The Burning of Edinburgh.—Ghastly Scenes.—Edinburgh a Second Moscow 47

CHAPTER X.

Great Suffering of the French Army.—Bitter Weather.—Another French Force lands at Carlisle.—More Fighting.—Splendid Charge of the English, who, however, are outnumbered.—Extraordinary Stratagem at Solway Frith.—Carlisle garrisoned by French.—Brilliant Defence of Derby.—The French amazed by the Stubbornness of the People.—Blazing Petroleum Carts.—Fearful Scenes 51

CHAPTER XI.

The March of the French on London.—Preparations by the English for the Defence of their Capital.—Sydenham seized by the French, and turned into a Fort.—Battle at Dulwich.—Arrival of the Northern Army, who Encamp at Hendon and Hampstead.—Narrowing up of the Investing Lines.—Great Destruction of Property in London.—Appalling Suffering amongst the People.—Westminster Abbey and the Houses of Parliament destroyed.—The Tower bombarded 56

CHAPTER XII.

Tremendous Battle in Hyde Park.—A French Army driven into the Serpentine during a Fog.—Stubbornness of the English Troops.—The Scene after the Battle.—Wreck and Ruin everywhere.—Heartrending Sufferings 63

CHAPTER XIII.

The Capitulation of London.—Enormous War Indemnity.—Loss of India, the Cape, Cyprus, and Gibraltar.—French Protectorate declared in Egypt.—Ireland's Fate.—England's Hopes 67


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1927. It may be copyrighted outside the U.S. (see Help:Public domain).