The Works of the Rev. Jonathan Swift/Volume 13/From Grace Granville to Jonathan Swift - 1

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DEAR SIR,
HAWNES, NOV. 27, 1733.
 


I HAVE received the honour of your commands, and shall obey them; for I am very proud of your remembrance. I do not know we ever quarrelled; but if we did, I am as good a Christian as you are, in perfect charity with you. My son, my daughter, and all our olive branches salute you most tenderly. I never wished so much as I do now, that I were bright, and had a genius, which could entertain you, in return for the many excellent things that entertain me daily, which I read over and over with fresh delight. Will you never come into England, and make Hawnes[2] your road? You will find nothing here to offend you; for I am a hermit, and live in my chimney corner, and have no ambition, but that you will believe I am the charming dean's

Most obedient humble servant,


  1. Grace, widow, and relict of George, lord Carteret, and daughter of John Granville, earl of Bath. She was created viscountess Carteret, and countess Granville, 1st Jan. 1714-15, with limitation of those honours to her son John, the late earl.
  2. A seat of lord Carteret, afterward earl Granville, in Bedfordshire.