United Nations Security Council Resolution 36

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Adopted by the Security Council at its 219th meeting, by 7 votes to 1 (Poland), with 3 abstentions (Columbia, Syria, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics), on 1 November 1947

The Security Council,

Having received and taken note of the report of the Consular Commission dated 14 October 1947, ([1]) indicating that the Council's resolution 27 (1947) of 1 August 1947 relating to the cessation of hostilities has not been fully effective,

Having taken note that, according to the report, no attempt was made by either side to come to an agreement with the other about the means of giving effect to that resolution,

1. Calls upon the parties concerned forthwith to consult with each other, either directly or through the Committee of Good Offices, as to the means to be employed in order to give effect to the cease-fire resolution, and, pending agreement, to cease any activities or incitement to activities which contravene that resolution, and to take appropriate measures for safeguarding life and property;

2. Requests the Committee of Good Offices to assist the parties in reaching agreement on an arrangement which will ensure the observance of the cease-fire resolution;

3. Requests the Consular Commission, together with its military assistants, to make its services available to the Committee of Good Offices;

4. Advises the parties concerned, the Committee of Good Offices and the Consular Commission that its resolution 27 (1947) of 1 August 1947 should be interpreted as meaning that the use of the armed forces of either party by hostile action to extend its control over territory not occupied by it on 4 August 1947 is inconsistent with Council resolution 27 (1947);

5. Invites the parties, should it appear that some withdrawals of armed forces are necessary, to conclude between them as soon as possible the agreement referred to in its resolution 30 (1947) of 25 August 1947.


[1] See Official Records of the Security Council, Second Year, Special Supplement No. 4

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