Author:Florence Earle Coates

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Florence Van Leer (Earle) Nicholson Coates
(1850–1927)
Florence Earle Coates—Philadelphia-born poet laureate of Pennsylvania who gained notoriety both at home and abroad for her works of poetry—nearly three-hundred of which were published in literary magazines of her day such as the Atlantic Monthly, Scribner's, The Literary Digest, Lippincott's, The Century Magazine, and Harper's.
Florence Van Leer (Earle) Nicholson Coates

CONTENTS Works Collections Fugitive Verse Musical Compositions Other Works

Works


"The business of art
is to enlarge and
correct the heart
and to lift our ideals
out of the ugly and the
mean
through love of the
ideal . . .
The business of art
is to appeal to the soul."


Florence Earle Coates Signature.jpg[1]


Collections


Mrs. Coates, pre-1894

Some day, it is to be hoped, we may look for a book of lyrics from Mrs. Florence Earle Coates, whose store of music increases with each month's magazines. Where there is so much sweetness in single notes, there must needs be an unusual charm in a complete opus.[2]

FEC Works.jpg

My "Poems" were written without a purpose, other than the expression of faiths and ideals strongly realized and emotions keenly felt. They were written for the joy of writing, and for the satisfaction of an irresistible impulse. It is my belief that it is not the business of art either to teach or to preach.
 "Camp Elsinore," Upper St. Regis Lake,
  New York, June 24, 1898.
[3]

The question of perpetual copyright is, in my judgement, entitled to the full and favorable consideration of the Congress of an enlightened republic. There would seem to be every reason for the equitable protection, without limit as to time, of the unquestioned property rights of its citizens.—FEC[5]

Fugitive Verse


Poetry by Florence Earle Coates which appeared in various periodicals or literary collections, but were not part of any of her own collections.

Mrs. Coates, pre-1916
The Mourner
Their Victory Won
Masefield
Beauty is eternal and ugliness, thank God, is ephemeral. Can there be any question as to which should attract the poet?—FEC[7]

Musical Compositions

Musical compositions with lyrics written by Florence Earle Coates set to song by various composers.

  • I Love, and the World is Mine
    (1891)
    I love, and the world is mine. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Clayton Johns. "To Miss Lena Little." Sop. or tenor in G. Song [with piano acc.]; score (5p.) 35 cm. New York, G. Schirmer. (1891)
  • I love, and the world is mine. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Clayton Johns. "To Miss Lena Little." Medium in F. Song [with piano acc.]; score (4p.) 35 cm. New York, G. Schirmer. (1891)
  • For me the jasmine buds unfold. Op. 19, no. 1. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Mrs. H. H. A. Beach. For sop. or tenor and piano. 1 score (7 p.). Boston : Arthur P. Schmidt. (1892)
  • Memoria; if only in my dreams. Op. 18, no. 2. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Frank Lynes. 1. In E Flat.—2. In G. (1892)
  • The Ideal. Op. 18, no. 9. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Frank Lynes. Compass D to G and B Flat to E Flat. (1892)
  • When Phyllis comes. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Clayton Johns. (1892)
  • For me the jasmine buds unfold. Op. 19, no. 1. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Mrs. H. H. A. Beach. Caption title. 1 score (7 p.) ; 35 cm. Boston : Arthur P. Schmidt. (1893)
  • I love, and the world is mine. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Harriet Burdett Wills. (1895)
  • When Phyllis comes. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Joshua Phippen. (1895)
  • My true love's eyes. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Harriet Burdett Wills. Quartet or chorus, mixed voices. (1896)
  • The ideal. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Harriet Burdett Wills. (1896)
  • Three songs (1. If love were not 2. Might I return 3. Rhapsody). Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by John Hasler. (1899)
  • Her cheek is like the tinted rose. Op. 185, no. 3. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Homer Newton Bartlett. John Church Co., Cincinnati. (1900)
The Pilgrims (1900)
  • The Pilgrims. ("Written for the Pennsylvania Society of Mayflower Descendants") Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Thomas Whitney Surette. New York : Novello, Ewer & Co. (1900)
  • A descant. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by William Wallace Gilchrist. (1901)
  • Go not too far. Op. 56, no. 2. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Mrs. H. H. A. Beach. High and low voice. Words also printed as text. Caption title. 1 score (5 p.) ; 35 cm. Boston : Arthur P. Schmidt. (1904)
  • I know not how to find the spring. Op. 56, no. 3. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Mrs. H. H. A. Beach. For medium voice and piano. Caption title. Words also printed as text on p. 2. 1 score (5 p.) ; 36 cm. Boston : Arthur P. Schmidt. (1904)
  • If love were not. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Clayton Johns. 4 p. of music ; 35 cm. Boston : Oliver Ditson & Co. (1904)
  • I love, and the world is mine! Op. 11, no. 3 (with Violin obbligato and piano). Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Charles Fonteyn Manney. 1 score (3 v.) + 1 part (1 v.) ; 34 cm. Boston : Oliver Ditson & Co. (1904)
  • Give me not love. Op. 61. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Mrs. H. H. A. Beach. Duet for soprano and tenor. Caption title. 1 score (7 p.) ; 34 cm. Boston : Arthur P. Schmidt. (1905)
  • The world is mine. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Della V. Oliver. (1905)
  • Her cheek is like a tinted rose. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Charles Gilbert Spross. (1906)
    • I Love, and the World is Mine
      (1906)
      I love and the world is mine. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Charles Gilbert Spross. For low voice and piano. "Dedicated to Cecilia Niles"—Caption. 1 score (5 p.) ; 33 cm. Cincinnati : John Church Co. (1906)
  • Two songs. (1. In April) Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Charles Gilbert Spross. (1906)
  • So is my love to me. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Clayton Johns. (1908)
  • The Red and the Blue. Words and music by Florence Earle Coates. Dedicated to Provost Charles Custis Harrison. (1909)
  • After. Op. 68. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Mrs. H. H. A. Beach. High and low voice. Words also printed as text. Caption title. 1 score (7 p.) ; 35 cm. Boston : Arthur P. Schmidt. (1909)
  • Tomorrow. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Charles Gilbert Spross. (1909)
  • Tomorrow. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Arthur William Foote. Trio [for women's voices]. Caption title. Score (4 p.) 27 cm. Boston : Arthur P. Schmidt. (1911)
  • I love and the world is mine. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Frank Lynes. (1911)
  • Through the rushes, by the river. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Arthur William Foote. Women's trio. Part song for women's voices [SSA and piano]. Caption title. 8 p. 28 cm. Boston : Arthur P. Schmidt. (1913)
  • After. Op. 34, no. 7a. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Henry Clough-Leighter. Three-part song for women's voices with pianoforte acc. (1914)
  • Two songs. (2. Her cheek is like a tinted rose.) Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Horatio William Parker. For soprano or tenor and piano. 1 score (5 p.) ; 34 cm. Boston : Arthur P. Schmidt. (1914)
  • A twilight lullaby. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Stanley F. Widener. Philadelphia : Theo Presser Co. (1916)
  • Who walks the world. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Clarence E. Rolfe, of U.S.; soprano or tenor, and mezzo-sop. or baritone. [6934] Boston : Arthur P. Schmidt. (1917)
  • When spring comes tripping. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by G. Cotton-Marshall. Trio or three-part chorus for women's voices. 4to. Philadelphia : Theo Presser Co. (1919)
  • The Heart of Spring. Poem by Florence Earle Coates; music by M. Grace Houseman. Three women's voices. 4to. (1924)
  • For me the jasmine buds unfold. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Victor Harris. Women's voices. 4to. (1926)
  • Rhapsody. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Douglas A Fletcher. [Photostat] 1 c. Newark, N. J.: Douglas A. Fletcher.
  • Suppliant. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Marion Eugénie Bauer. Recitation, piano acc. Monologues with music (piano). 1 ms. score (3 p.) ; 34 cm. (date unknown)
  • Two songs. Op. 27. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by Philip James. High voice with piano. 2 v. ; 35 cm. (date unknown)
  • A love song. Words by Florence Earle Coates; music by William H. Neidlinger. Copyrighted on 26 Oct 1929 by Neidlinger's widow, Orra B. Neidlinger, East Orange, N.J. (original date unknown)
...poetry needed no renascence. It was not young, it is not old.—FEC[8]

Other Works

Works by Coates

Greeting card from the Laurel Series, ca. 1910's (see original signed copy)
  • The Edward H. Coates Memorial Collection: Presented by Mrs. Coates to The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (1923) The exhibition included twenty-seven paintings and three pieces of sculpture. The works were exhibited at the Academy from 4 November 1923 to 10 January 1924 in Gallery A and in the South Corridor.[9]

Articles

Letters

Works about Coates

Articles

  • "Florence Earle Coates" by Ellen Olney Kirk (The Magazine of Poetry, 1889: Vol. 1 No. 3 p. 267-268.)
Mrs. Coates, ca. 1905
  • "Florence Earle Coates" by Jane Campbell (Woman's Progress, May 1895; Vol. 4 No. 6:240-48.)
  • "Florence Earle Coates" by Harrison S. Morris (Book News Monthly, December 1898; Vol. 17 No. 196:191.)
  • "A Camp in the Adirondacks: The summer home of Mrs. Florence Earle Coates, the Philadelphia poet" (Book News Monthly, October 1905; Vol. XXIV No. 278:69-72.)
  • "The Poetry of Florence Earle Coates" by Warwick James Price (The Pathfinder, June 1911; Vol. V No. 6.)
  • "A Foremost American Lyrist: An Appreciation" by William Stanley Braithwaite (Lippincott's Monthly, March 1913; Vol. 91:296-304.)
  • "Godlessness Mars Most Contemporary Poetry: Mrs. Coates finds modern poets nervously seeking novelties, and says in art there can be nothing new that is not ugly" (The New York Times, 10 December 1916.)
  • "From Florence Coates to Amy Lowell: A Glance at Modernity" by O. W. Firkins (The Nation, 3 May 1917; Vol. 104 No. 2705:522-4.)
  • "Florence Earle Coates: Some Phases of Her Life and Poetry" by Elizabeth Clendenning Ring (Book News Monthly, Vol. 36 No. 4, December 1917.)
  • "The Christian Hope—Its Meaning for Today" (Section: From Amos N. Wilder): Religion in Life, Winter issue, 1951-1952; p. 10-19. In this piece, Wilder mentions a conversation he had with Mrs. Coates (post-1921), where she quoted, "A man's wisdom is measured by his hope"—herself referencing Emerson.[11]
  • "Florence Earle Coates: A Poet Inspired by Matthew Arnold" by Gordon Howard (Germantown Crier, V. 63 No. 2 Fall 2013.)

Letters

from M. E. R.

Unsure of who the initials "M. E. R." belong to, the following poem was written to Mrs. Coates by M. E. R. "on receiving one of her poems." The poem appeared in a 27 November 1902 issue (p. 343) of City and State—a weekly Philadelphia publication. The following is as-rendered in the aforementioned issue:



TO FLORENCE EARLE COATES.
(On receiving one of her poems.)

Praise to thee, sweet singer, whose refrain
   With tender, rhythmic melody is fraught;
Thy words are pearls strung on a golden chain
   Of ever-varying theme and noblest thought.
No Circe's subtle songs the soul offend
   Nor passion's pulses at thy bidding rise,
But heart-throbs true and warm their tribute send
   To thee, whose messengers, so pure and wise,
Herald how fair within the kingdom is
   Where daily thoughts transmuted turn to gold,
The "Kingdom whyche excelles all other blisse,"[12]
   Where posies, like to angel-wings, unfold
To waft us nearer heaven—that blessed place
Where friendship worships with unveiled face.

—M. E. R.

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Coates Camp Elsinore letterhead bookplate.jpg

References

  1. from "Godlessness Mars Most Contemporary Poetry." The New York Times, 10 December 1916.
  2. The Literary World, 26 March 1892; p. 109.
  3. Book News (Aug 1898) at Google books.
  4. Historically listed and referenced as a "Collected edition," Robert H. Walker—in his biographical sketch of Mrs. Coates (Walker, Robert H. "Coates, Florence Earle." Notable American Women:1607-1950. Cambridge, MA:Belknap Press of the Harvard Univ. Press, 1974:354.)—notes that the two-volume set is "really selected."
  5. Mrs. Coates on perpetual copyright (The Literary World, 28 Oct 1899).
  6. Alfred Dreyfus
  7. from "Godlessness Mars Most Contemporary Poetry." The New York Times, 10 December 1916.
  8. from "Godlessness Mars Most Contemporary Poetry." The New York Times, 10 December 1916.
  9. Cover photo of the Edward H. Coates Memorial Collection booklet.
  10. "Verses by R. W. Gilder"
  11. See "Matthew Arnold", where Mrs. Coates quotes Arnold referencing Emerson.
  12. This line references a poem by Sir Edward Dyer entitled, "My Mind to Me a Kingdom Is."


Some or all works by this author are in the public domain in the United States because they were published before January 1, 1923.

The author died in 1927, so works by this author are also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. Works by this author may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.