Author:James George Frazer

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James George Frazer
(1854–1941)
M.A., D.C.L., LL.D., Litt.D. Professor of Social Anthropology. Liverpool University. Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. Fellow of the British Academy. Author of The Golden Bough;&c
This author wrote articles for the Encyclopædia Britannica, Ninth Edition.
Articles attributed to this author are designated in EB9 by the initials "J. G. Fr."
This author wrote articles for the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica.
Articles attributed to this author are designated in EB1911 by the initials "J. G. Fr."
James George Frazer

Works[edit]

  • Totemism (1887)
  • The Golden Bough
    • First edition (1890 – two volumes) subtitled A Study in Comparative Religion (transcription volumes: 1, 2)
    • Second edition (1900 – three volumes) subtitled A Study in Magic and Religion
    • Third edition (1906–1915 – twelve volumes)
      • Part 1: The Magic Art and the Evolution of Kings (two volumes)
      • Part 2: Taboo and the Perils of the Soul (1911)
      • Part 3: The Dying God (1911)
      • Part 4: Adonis Attis Osiris (1906 – two volumes)
      • Part 5: Spirits of the Corn and of the Wild (1912 – two volumes)
      • Part 6: The Scapegoat (1913)
      • Part 7: Balder the Beautiful (1913 – two volumes)
      • Volume 12: Bibliography and General Index (1915)

Contributions to EB9[edit]

Contributions to EB1911[edit]

Contributions to Folk-Lore[edit]

Articles in Popular Science Monthly[edit]

Works about Frazer[edit]

Reviews on Folk-Lore[edit]


Some or all works by this author are in the public domain in the United States because they were published before January 1, 1926.


The author died in 1941, so works by this author are also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 75 years or less. Works by this author may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.