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Index:Confederate Military History - 1899 - Volume 9.djvu

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Confederate Military History - 1899 - Volume 9.djvu

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CONTENTS— KENTUCKY.

PAGE.

CHAPTER I The "Dark and Bloody Ground"—Battle Ground of Northern and Southern Indians— Importance of a Correct History- of the South in the War— The Principles Involved in the Struggle—Mr. Jefferson's Views—Attitude of Other Statesmen North and South— State Rights and Nullification in the North—Blood not Shed in Vain

3

CHAPTER II. Attitude of Kentucky Before and During the War—Origin of the Doctrine of Neutrality—Why the Southern Men Acquiesced—How They Were Deceived and Overreached—Violation of Neutrality by Union Party—Last Efforts of the Southern Element — Response of President Davis and President Lincoln— Occupation of Columbus by General Polk—Action of the Legislature— General Anderson Takes Command —Reign of Terror— Flight of Southern Leaders

16

CHAPTER III. First Confederate Troops-Ge n. S, B. Buckner—Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston—The Confederate Line in Kentucky—John H. Morgan—General Sherman Succeeds Anderson—"War Must be Carried to Southern Firesides"—Sherman Superseded by Buell—First Engagement in Kentucky—Confederate Organization ac Bowling Green—Kentucky Commands.

33

CHAPTER IV. Political Movements-John C. Breckinridge Enters Confederate Army-Organization of Provisional Government-George W. Johnson Chosen Governor—Confederate Senators and Congressmen— Kentucky Admitted as a State in the Southern Confederacy—Confederate Defeat at Fishing Creek—Fall of Fort Henry

51

CHAPTER V. General Grant Invests Fort Donelson— Sortie in Force by the Confederates—Its Success -Troops Ordered Back to the Trenches—Gallant Fighting of Second and Eighth Kentucky—General Buckner Surrenders to Grant

57

CHAPTER VI. Effects of the Surrender of Fort Doneslon—Reorganization of Confederate Army at Murfreesboro—Johnston's Junction with Beauregard:, Bragg and Polk—Grant at Pittsburg Landing—Johnston Advances— Battle of Shiloh—Part Taken by Kentucky Confederate Troops—Death of General Johnston and Governor Johnson

63

CHAPTER VII. Reorganization of the Army at Corinth—General Breckinridge Sent to Vicksburg— Battle of Baton Rouge—Bragg Asks for Breckinridge to Command a Division in Kentucky Campaign—He Marches from Knoxville for Kentucky

74

CHAPTER VIII. Summer Campaign in 1862— Buell's Campaign for the Reduction of East Tennessee — The Occupation

PAGE.

of Cumberland Gap—Gen. E. Kirby Smith in East Tennes-see—General Bueil Threatens Chattanooga— Confederate Plans of Campaign

83

CHAPTER IX Two Great Cavalry Leaders— John Hunt Morgan and Nathan B. Forrest—Morgan's First Raid through Kentucky—Capture of Murfreesboro by General Forrest-Capture of Gallatin Tenn., by General Morgan— Destruction of Buell's Lines of Communication—Battle of Hartsville, Tenn.

91

CHAPTER X. Bragg's Kentucky Campaign— Its Conception Due to Gen. K. Kirby Smith—Transfer of Bragg's Army from Tupelo to Chattanooga— Organization of the Forces—General Smith's Bold Advance—Great Confederate Victory at Richmond— Occupation of Lexington and Frankfort-Enthusiastic Reception by the People

114

CHAPTER XI. Bragg's Advance from Chattanooga— Bueil Moves to Bowling Green—Chalmers' Defeat at Munfordville—Its Surrender with 4,000 Men—Proclamation of Thanksgiving

127

CHAPTER XII Bragg's Situation at Muufordville— Disappointments of the Army—Necessity for Co-operation with General Smith—Inauguration of Governor II awes -Buells Arrival in Louisville-Bragg's Fatal Misinterpretation of Buell's Movement—Movements Preceding Battle of Perryville

132

CHAPTER XIII. Battle of Perryvillc— Topography of the Surrounding Country— Relative Position of Opposing Forces—Confederate Victory but Virtual Defeat — Bragg Falls Back to Harrodsburg—Beginning of Retreat from Kentucky—Gen. Humphrey Marshall

140

CHAPTER XIV. The Retreat from Kentucky— Confederate Forces Pass through Cumberland Gap— Breckinridge with his Kentuckians Sent to Murfreesboro— Buell Superseded by Rosecrans— Condition of Kentucky after Evacuation — Increased Persecution of Southern People

147

CHAPTER XV. Occupation of Middle Tennessee — Reorganization of Kentucky Troops — The Kentucky Brigade— Cavalry Organizations— Brilliant Operations of General Morgan—Battle of Murfreesboro — Bragg's Order of Battle— Some Details of the Bloody Engagement— Second Battle — Death of General Hanson — Breckinridge's Report

151

CHAPTER XVI. Bragg's Army in Winter Quarters— Death of Colonel Trabue— Breckinridge's Division Sent to Mississippi — Fall of Vicksburg — Operations in Mississippi and Alabama— Federal Advance in Tennessee — Morgan's Great Raid through Ohio

160

CHAPTER XVII. Rosecrans Flanks Chattanooga and Bragg Evacuates— Buckner Joins Bragg — Movements of Opposing Armies— Battle of Chickamauga — Important Part Played by Kentucky Officers and Soldiers — Death of Gen. Ben Hardin Helm— Great Confederate Victory — Breckinridge, buckner and Preston.

174
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PAGE.

CHAPTER XVIII. Investment of Chattanooga by Bragg—Battle of Missionary Ridge—Separation of the Kentuckians—Gen. Joseph E, Johnston Succeeds Bragg—His Compliment to the Orphan Brigade—Breckinridge's Service in Virginia—His Victory at New Market—Ovation from Lee's Army—At Cold Harbor and Monocacy—His Department of Southwest Virginia—Secretary of War

182

CHAPTER XIX. Opening of the Atlanta Campaign— Rocky Face Gap—Resaca—New Hope Church—Service of the Kentucky Brigade—Battles around Atlanta—Battle of Jonesboro—Severe Losses—The Kentucky Brigade is Mounted—Its Subsequent Services—Other Kentucky Commands-Return of the Kentuckians to Their Homes—Restoration to Citizenship

193

CHAPTER XX. Kentucky Commands in Confederate Service—Approximate Number of Kentuckians in Federal and Confederate Service — Kentuckians as Soldiers — Professor Shaler'a Estimate— Words of Wisdom from the Leader Whose Destiny We Followed

201
APPENDIX A 213
APPENDIX B 216
BIOGRAPHICAL 225

ILLUSTRATIONS— KENTUCKY.

FACING PAGE.
Burord, A. 236
Cosby, George B. 248
"ClUTTENpEN, Geo. B 236
Duke, Basil W 248
Field, Charles W 236
H Anson, R W 248
Hawes, J. M 236
Helm, B H. 248
Hodge, G. B. 248
Johnston, J. S. 1
Kentucky, State (Map) Between pages 234 and 225
Lewis, Joseph H 236
Lyon, H. H 235
Marshall, Humphrey 248
Morgan, John H 236
Perryville, Battle (Map) 140
Preston, William 236
Smith, Gustavus W 248
Williams, John S 248

CONTENTS—MISSOURI.

PAGE.

CHAPTER I. Introductory— The Admission of Missouri to the Union— The Beginning of the Contest Between the North and the South--The Missouri Compromise—The Kansas-Nebraska Bill — New England Emigrant Aid Societies—The National Election in 1860—The Southern Element Divided—Dangerous Position of the State—New Party Organizations and Leaders—The Southwest Expedition

3

CHAPTER II The Legislature Meets— Governor Stewart's Farewell Message—Governor Jackson's Inaugural—Bills to Call a State Convention and to Organize the State Militia—The Convention Bill Passed —Vest's Resolution—Election of Delegates to the State Convention—Fate of the Bill to Arm the State

11

CHAPTER III. The State Convention— Sterling Price Elected President—Committee on Federal Relations Reports Against Secession—The Convention Adopts the Report and Adjourns—The House Again Refuses to Arm the State—St. Louis Police Bill—Home Guards and Minute Men—General Frost Authorized to Take the Arsenal—Blair Appeals to the President—Capt Nathaniel Lyon at St Louis— The Liberty Arsenal Seized—Military Organizations under Frost and Lyon

20

CHAPTER IV. President Davis Sends Siege Guns— Blair and Lyon Prepare to Take the Camp and the Guns— Frost Surrenders—Home Guards Fire on the Crowd — The Legislature Acts Promptly — Reign of Terror in St. Louis — The Legislature Provides a Military Fund— Sterling Price Commander of the State Guard—The Price-Harney Agreement— Harney Supplanted by Lyon—The Planter's House Conference

31

CHAPTER V. Governor Jackson Calls Out the Militia—Jefferson City Abandoned— Concentration at Boqnville—Railroad Bridges Destroyed— Colonel Holloways Death—Price Goes to Lexington—Lyon Occupies the Capital—Skirmish at Booneville—The Governor Starts Southwest — A Federal Regiment Routed at Cold Camp — Junction of Jackson and Rams— Victory at Carthage.

42

CHAPTER VI Lyon Leaves Boonville for the Southwest—Fnce Reinforced by McCulloch and Pearce— They Start to thir Governor's Rescue — The Rendezvous at Cowskln Prairie—The Combined Force Moves toward Springfield—Lyon Advances to Meet Them— The Battle ot Wilson's Creek-Death of Lyon— A Fruitless Victory

50

CHAPTER VII. Sigel Retreats to Kolla — McCulloch and Pearce Return to Arkansas — Federal Defeat at Dry wood—Price Invests the Federal Works at Lexington— The Moving Breastworks— Mulligan Surrenders — An Affair at Blue Mills

PAGE.

—General Thompson and His Operations— Price Compelled to Retreat—The Legislature at' Neosho Passes an Act of Secession—Members of the Confederate Congress Chosen—Fremont's Bodyguard Defeated at Springfield — Hunter Succeeds Fremont and Retreats— Reorganization of the State Troops — First and Second Confederate Brigades

63

CHAPTER VIII Price Falls Bark to Arkansas — Affair at Sugar Camp— Price and McCulloch Disagree — Van Dorn Takes Personal Command — The Battle of Pea Ridge—McCulloch and Mcintosh Killed — Van Dorn Retreats — Van Dorn's Opinion of the Missourians— The Army of the West Ordered East of the Mississippi— General Price's Address to His Troops

75

CHAPTER IX. The Missouri Troops at Corinth— Reorganization Continued — The First Missouri Infantry—Affair at Farmington — Beauregard Evacuates Corinth — Price in Command in Northern ^Mississippi— Fighting at Iuka— -Van Dorn and Price Attack Corinth— Price Successful—Van Porn Fails—The Missourians Complimented— The Retreat—Bowen's Stubborn Fighting — Price Finds a Way Out

65

CHAPTER X. The Trans-Mississippi Department Open to Federal Occupation — Hindman Takes Command — Shelby Goes into Missouri to Raise a Regiment — Battle of Lone Tack — Three Regiments Organized at Newtonia— A Brigade Formed with Shelby Commanding — The Fight at Newtonia— Hindman Superceded—Holmes Orders Troops Out of Missouri—The Desperate Fight at Cane Hill.

95

CHAPTER XI. Hindman Prepares for a Campaign— The Battle of Prairie Grove—Both Armies Retreat—Holme; Abandons the Upper Arkansas Valley—Hindman Relieved of Command in the West—Marmaduke Moves into Missouri—Repulse at Springfield — A Hard Fight at Hartville

107

CHAPTER XII. The Missoari Brigades Oppose Grant Below Vicksburg—Death of Col. William Wade— Battle of Port Gibson— Battle of Baker's Creek— The Missourians Save the Army — Affair at Big Black River — Siege of Vicksburg—Provisions Fail— General Green and Colonel Irwin Killed—Surrender of the City and of the Army — Peath of General Bowen — The Missouri Brigade

116

CHAPTER XIII. Operations in the Trans-Mississippi Pepartment— General Kirby Smith Assumes Command— Marmaduke Makes an Expedition into Missouri— The Affair at Bloom field — Battle of Helena— Steele Moves on Little Rock — Battle of Bayou Meto — Evacuation of Little Rock —Shelby Prepares for an Expedition into Missouri

130

CHAPTER XIV Shelby's Raid through Missouri — The Fight near Marshall— Brilliant Exploits of Shelby's Command — Marmaduke Attacks Pine Bluff

141

CHAPTER XV. The Missouri Brigade in the Georgia and Tennessee Campaigns- -Service at New Hope Church — At Kcncsaw Mountain— It Captures One of the Forts at Allatoona—Disaster at Franklin—Rear Guard in the Retreat

PAGE.

from Nashville—Bledsoe's Battery—General Maury's Opinion of the Brigade

152

CHAPTER XVI. General Price Commands the District of Arkansas—Parsons' Division Sent to General Taylor in Louisiana—The Battle of Pleasant Hill—Marmaduke Opposes Steele's Advance—Steele Goes to Camden—Poison Spring — Marks' Mill— Steele Evacuates Camden—Battle of Jenkins' Ferry — Steele Returns to Little Rock

158

CHAPTER XVII. Marmadukc and Greene's Brigade on the Mississippi River—The Kattle ot Ditch Bayou—Shelby Goes to North Arkansas—Rids the Country of the Robber Bands—Captures a Gunboat—An Engagement with Carr—Capture of an Illinois Regiment—Fights at Big Cypress —Price Crosses the Arkansas at Dardauelle

169

CHAPTER XVIII General Price's Expedition in Missouri—The Southern Women of Missouri—Clark and Jackman Take Glasgow— Fight at Little Blue—Guerrilla Warfare in Missouri—A Retaliation of Federal Outrages—General Halleck's Order—Lawrence Burped in the Retaliation for the Burning of Osceola

173

CHAPTER XIX. Price's Army Encounters Severe Fighting—Shelby Comes to the Rescue—The Battle of Ncwtonia—Hardships of the Retreat—The Court of Inquiry

189

CHAPTER XX. The Missouri Brigade Sent to the Defense of Mobile—General Canby Declines an Open Field Fight—The Troops West of the Mississippi Despondent—Magruder and Shelby—General Lee's Surrender—Shelby Issues an Address to His Troops—Goes to Shreveport and Proposes a Plan of Action—It is Adopted, but Miscarries—The Missouri Troops Stand Firm—Shelby Goes to Mexico—The End

197
BIOGRAPHICAL 301

ILLUSTRATIONS— MISSOURI.

FACING PAGE. Between pages 202 and 203 Wilson's Creek, Battle (J