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Index:Confederate Military History - 1899 - Volume 1.djvu

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Confederate Military History - 1899 - Volume 1.djvu

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TABLE OF CONTENTS.

HON. J. L. M. CURRY, LL. D.

Legal Justification of the South in Secession

1-58

WILLIAM R. GARRETT.
The South as a Factor in the Territorial Expansion of the United States

59-246

CHAPTER I. Territorial Expansion a Distinctive Feature in the history of the United States—The South a Leading Factor in this Policy

61

CHAPTER II. The Extension of the Territory of the United States and from the Alleghany Mountains to the Mississippi River and North of the Ohio River

72

CHAPTER III. Hostilities with France and the Acquisition of Louisiana

123

CHAPTER IV. The Second War with Great Britain—Spanish Complications—Spain Cedes Florida, and Her Claims to Oregon

160

CHAPTER V. Annexation of Texas—War with Mexico—Mexican Cessions—Oregon Treaty with Great Britain

205
CHAPTER VI. Confederate War—Acquisition of Alaska 239
BRIG-GEN. CLEMENT A. EVANS
The Civil History of the Confederate States 247-570

CHAPTER I. The Settlement of 1850—Previous Sectional Questions—Origin of the Terms North and South—Extent of "Old South"—Sectional Rivalries—Slaveholding Nearly Universal—Objected to by the South and Insisted on by the Slave Traders—"Profit and Loss"—and not Conscience—Causes which Necessitate the Confederate States

249

CHAPTER II. First Organized Attack—Garrison the Original and Able Representative—Politicians Embrace Sectionalism—National Rebuke and Fight Against the Greatness of the Union by the Sectionalists—Secession Threatened—Mexican War and its Results—Sudden and Fierce Attacks on Southern Policy in 1849-50—The South's Pacific Sentiment—Union Imperiled by Men of Sectional Views—Clay and Webster, Douglas and Davis Work Together for a National Settlement—The Compromise of 1850

263

CHAPTER III. Political Alignment in 1852—Democrat, Whig and Freesoiler—The Settlement of 1850 Ratified—Pierce President—Nullification Measures in Northern States—Renewal of Agitation by Freesoilers—Shadows Showing a Coming Event—Sectional Discord Necessary to the Freesoil Faction—Kansas Troubles and Emigrant Aid Societies—The Shaping of a Party Strictly Northern—Local Successes

277

Vote Given to National Northern Men—Buchanan elected by Only Nineteen States—The Election Endorsed the Compromise of 1850—Kansas Agitation Renewed by the Sectionalists—Democratic Leaders Divide the Party—Lincoln and Douglas—The Union Imperiled for Party Success—The Brown's Raid a Result of Methodic Madness—Pulpit, Press and Platform Stir Up Passions—Helper's Impending Crisis Reinforces Uncle Tom's Cabin

291

CHAPTER V. The Agitators of Sectionalism Combine in 1859—The Constitutional Unionists Divide—The South Unable to Control the Question—Resolutions of Mr. Davis 1860—Platforms, Nominations and Canvass for the Presidency—National Union Sentiment Overthrown—Mr. Lincoln Elected—The Fixed Sectional Majority of States Attained

306

CHAPTER VI. The Effect Produced by the Presidential Contest of 1860—Northern Recoil from the Yawning Bloody Chasm—Commercial Interest—Southern Alarm—Southern Efforts to Avoid Secession—Rally of the Northern Extremists—Buchanan’s Perplexity—Beginning of Federal Movements to Hold the South by Force—Secession Movements in the South

316

CHAPTER VII. Yet Four Months of Power—Buchanan’s Vacillation—Opinion Against Coercion—Scott Proposes Force—Major Anderson Instructed—Reinforcement of Sumter Considered—United States Congress Takes Up the Crisis—Crittenden, Stephens and Davis in and out of Congress Plead for an Adjustment—Committee of Thirty-three and Commmittee of Thirteen

325

CHAPTER VIII. Vigorous Work to Strengthen Fort Sumter—Cabinet Officers Resign Buchanan’s Policy Looks War-like—Seward Calls Secession a Humbug—Lincoln Instructs Against Compromise—Election in South Carolina and Secession Ordinance Passed—Commissioners from South Carolina Sent to Washington—Anderson’s Strategy in Moving from Fort Moultrie an Act of War—Lincoln in December Advises Scott to Hold the Forts or Retake Them—Failure of Peace Measures in Congress—The Dark Day

335

CHAPTER IX. Policy Foreshadowed in December, 1860—War-like Preparations—Star of the West Hired to Reinforce Sumter—Southern Leaders Grow Hopeless of Peace—Northern Leaders Oppose Compromise—Crittenden, Davis, Toombs and Others Urge Conciliation—Virginia to the Rescue—Border States Declare Against Coercion—Secession of Several States—Peace Congress—"Peace Hath No Victories"

347

CHAPTER X. Delegates of Seceded States Meet in Montgomery—Adoption by Convention of a Provisional Government—Election of Officers—Inauguration of Mr. Davis as President—Measures Adopted—Commissioners Sent to Washington and to Foreign Countries—The Constitution of the Confederate States of America

358

CHAPTER XI. President Lincoln’s Inauguration—Military Display—Cabinet—Confederate Commissioners at Washing-

PAGE

ton Mr. Seward s Double Dealing with Them The Fort Sumter Reinforcement Question

372

CHAPTER XII. The Fight for Forts Proceedings Against Fort Sumter The South Deluded The Astute Scheme to Reinforce The Fleet, the Demonstration, the Surrender

381

CHAPTER XIII. Lincoln s Call for 75,000 Volunteers Responses of Governors Confederate Preparations for Defense Political Effect in the North Confederate Congress Summoned to Meet Letters of Marque Blockade

393

CHAPTER XIV. Confederate War Policy President Davis Proclamation Sympathy for Maryland Virginia Forces Organized by Lee Federals Cross the Potomac Confederate Government Transferred to Richmond Congress of the Confederate States and the United States Messages Per

403

CHAPTER XV. Comparison of Resources The Advance to ward Richmond Curious Story of the First Manassas Told in the Records The Discomfiture Turned to Political Advantage Confederate Flags in Full View from Washington Question of Offensive or Defensive War Additional Commissions from the Confederacy to Europe Acts of Confederate Congress The Trent Affair

417

CHAPTER XVI. Character of the Confederate Government-Message of the President Congressional Debates on War Policy Use of Cotton, Tobacco, etc. Foreign Affairs

430

CHAPTER XVII. Second Session of Congress Message-Bills Introduced Discussions of Military Events -Lincoln s First Emancipation Proclamation Retaliation Sequestration California and Oregon Counterfeit Money Commissions to Washington to Propose Peace The Loan Impor

445

CHAPTER XVIII. Emancipation Proclamation The Necessity of It Effect The Southern View Negro Enrollment in Northern Armies Meeting of Confederate Congress Message Debates Resolutions Army Movements The

461

CHAPTER XIX. Mediation Attempted Foreign Affairs-Peace Spirit Prisoners of War Amnesty on Conditions

472

CHAPTER XX. Exchanges Prisons and Prisoners Andersonville in the South Elmira, Johnson s Island and Fort Delaware in the North Confederate Government Not Re

484

CHAPTER XXI. Armies East and West United States Congress Message of President Lincoln The Confederate States Congress Message of President Davis No Sign of Yielding All Male Citizens in the South Enrolled Other Acts of Congress Politics in the United States Thirteenth Amendment Proposed A Peace Movement War Preparations Confederate Viictories

499

CHAPTER XXII. Political Battle of 1864 in the North Peace

Page

Currents Southern Peace Movements War or Peace Dis cussed in United States Congress The Situation in July-Niagara Conference

509

CHAPTER XXIII. Re-Survey, Military and Political Radical Convention in May Republican Convention in June Southern View of Northern Politics Failure of the Armistice Peace Propositions Ignored National Democratic Convention in August Southern Desire for McClellan Election The Canvass for Presidency Lincoln Re-elected

532

CHAPTER XXIV. Confederate Congress, November, 1664—Message—Question of Enrolling Negroes in Southern Service—Measures of the Congress—Negotiations for Peace Proposed by Congress

538

CHAPTER XXV. Mission of Mr. Blair—Davis and Lincoln Exchange Letters through Blair—Failure of Blair Discussed—The Hampton Roads Conference

543

CHAPTER XXVI. Military Disparities—Wise on the Part of the South to Refuse Unconditional Surrender—Why the Final Fight was—Made Closely Allied Military and Civil Events—Last Message of President Davis to Congress—Last Acts of Congress Patriotic Act of Virginia and Other States Grant Breaks the Lines at Last Richmond Evacuated—The President and Cabinet Move to North Carolina and Georgia Capture of the President—Assassination of President Lincoln Malicious Prosecution of President Davis—The Dissolution of the Confederate States of America

560

BIOGRAPHICAL

571-737