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The Satyricon of Petronius Arbiter

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The Satyricon of Petronius Arbiter  (1922) 
by Petronius Arbiter, translated by W. C. Firebaugh

THE SATYRICON
OF
PETRONIUS ARBITER


The Witches (page 138)

THE SATYRICON OF PETRONIUS ARBITER

Complete and unexpurgated translation by W. C. Firebaugh, in which are incorporated the forgeries of Nodot and Marchena, and the readings introduced into the text by De Salas. Illustrations by Norman Lindsay.


New York: 1922. Published for Private Circulation Only by Boni & Liveright

Copyright, 1922, by
Boni and Liveright, Inc.
New York.

This edition is strictly limited to Twelve Hundred and Fifty sets, of which 1200 numbered sets are for subscribers.

No. 1145

CONTENTS

page
PREFACE v
INTRODUCTION xiii
THE SATYRICON 1
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapter 20
Chapter 21
Chapter 22
Chapter 23
Chapter 24
Chapter 25
Chapter 26
Chapter 27
Chapter 28
Chapter 29
Chapter 30
Chapter 31
Chapter 32
Chapter 33
Chapter 34
Chapter 35
Chapter 36
Chapter 37
Chapter 38
Chapter 39
Chapter 40
Chapter 41
Chapter 42
Chapter 43
Chapter 44
Chapter 45
Chapter 46
Chapter 47
Chapter 48
Chapter 49
Chapter 50
Chapter 51
Chapter 52
Chapter 53
Chapter 54
Chapter 55
Chapter 56
Chapter 57
Chapter 58
Chapter 59
Chapter 60
Chapter 61
Chapter 62
Chapter 63
Chapter 64
Chapter 65
Chapter 66
Chapter 67
Chapter 68
Chapter 69
Chapter 70
Chapter 71
Chapter 72
Chapter 73
Chapter 74
Chapter 75
Chapter 76
Chapter 77
Chapter 78
Chapter 79
Chapter 80
Chapter 81
Chapter 82
Chapter 83
Chapter 84
Chapter 85
Chapter 86
Chapter 87
Chapter 88
Chapter 89
Chapter 90
Chapter 91
Chapter 92
Chapter 93
Chapter 94
Chapter 95
Chapter 96
Chapter 97
Chapter 98
Chapter 99
Chapter 100
Chapter 101
Chapter 102
Chapter 103
Chapter 104
Chapter 105
Chapter 106
Chapter 107
Chapter 108
Chapter 109
Chapter 110
Chapter 111
Chapter 112
Chapter 113
Chapter 114
Chapter 115
Chapter 116
Chapter 117
Chapter 118
Chapter 119
Chapter 120
Chapter 121
Chapter 122
Chapter 123
Chapter 124
Chapter 125
Chapter 126
Chapter 127
Chapter 128
Chapter 129
Chapter 130
Chapter 131
Chapter 132
Chapter 133
Chapter 134
Chapter 135
Chapter 136
Chapter 137
Chapter 138
Chapter 139
Chapter 140
Chapter 141
NOTES
Prostitution 365
Paederastia 387
chapter  
9 Gladiator obscene 400
17 Impotence 402
26 Peepholes in brothels 406
34 Silver Skeleton 407
36 Marsyas 409
40 A pie full of birds 412
56 Contumelia 414
116 Life in Rome 419
116 Legacy hunting 429
119 Castration 430
127 Circe’s voice 441
131 Sputum in charms 442
131 The “infamous finger” 443
138 The dildo 446
  The Cordax 453
SIX NOTES BY MARCHENA
Introduction 461
chapter  
I Soldiers in love 463
II Courtesans 468
III Greek love 477
IV Pollution 497
V Virginity 501
VI Pandars 506
Bibliography

ILLUSTRATIONS


The Witches Frontispiece
page
An Extemporary Declamation 6
An Old Herb Woman 10
Hurrying to the Inn 12
Making Off 20
Tryphena 24
The Holy Mysteries 44
Quartilla 46
Psyche 48
The Catamite 50
The Debauch 52
The Drunkards 54
Quartilla and Giton 56
The Chink in the Door 58
Pannychis 62
The Procession 66
The Guilty Slave 70
Fortunata 80
Encolpius 90
The Rope Dancers 116
The Homerists 130
The Entry of Habinnas 144
Fortunata and Habinnas 148
Fortunata Dancing 154
The Bath 162
The Disturbance 164
Giton 176
The Tell-tale Shoes 182
Eumolpus 186
Eumolpus Stoned 200
The Inn-Keeper 212
The Fight at the Inn 214
The Embarkation 222
The Fight 248
Eumolpus Reciting 252
The Ephesian Matron 258
The Rescue of Tryphena 268
Corax 278
Chrysis 306
Circe 310
Circe and Encolpius 314
Circe Enraged 322
The Priestess’ Revenge 330
Proselenos 334
Encolpius Beaten 342
Encolpius and Chrysis 350
On the Road 360


 This work is a translation and has a separate copyright status to the applicable copyright protections of the original content.

Original:

This work was published before January 1, 1928, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.

 
Translation:

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published in 1922, before the cutoff of January 1, 1928.


The longest-living author of this work died in 1945, so this work is in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 77 years or less. This work may be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.