The Oldest Known Writing in Siamese: The Inscription of Phra Ram Khamhæng of Sukhothai, 1293 A.D.

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For other English-language translations of this work, see Ram Khamhaeng Inscription.

THE OLDEST KNOWN WRITING IN SIAMESE

THE INSCRIPTION OF

Phra Ram Khamhæng of Sukhothai

1293 A.D.


BY

CORNELIUS BEACH BRADLEY, A.M.

Professor of Rhetoric in the University of California.


Bangkok

1909.



THE author gratefully acknowledges his special indebted-to:—H. R. R. Prince Damrong Rajanubhab, Minister of the Interior, for permission to use the resources of the Vajirañana Library and to have free access to the Sŭkhothăi stone, and particularly for his invaluable personal assistance in the identification of places named in the text; to Oscar Frankfurter, Ph. D., Secretary of the National Library, for the generosity with which he has honored every draft made upon the stores of his learning and scholarship, and for his kindly interest, wise counsel, and unwearied helpfulness that have attended every stage of the work; to Phră Măha Wĭcha Thăm and Luang Chănthăramat, his learned assistants, for almost daily help rendered by them in all matters of Siamese philology and archeology; to Mr. R. W. Giblin, F.R.G.S. of the Royal Survey Department, for the reproductions of the text which accompany this paper; and in the North, to Chău Suriyawong of Chiengmai, to Phră Năphi Sipĭsankhŭn of Wat Chieng Măn, and, not least, to Rev. Daniel McGilvary, D.D., for elucidation of many difficult points involving special knowledge of the Lao country, customs, and speech.



Chapters (not individually listed)

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923.


The author died in 1936, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.