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The Spirit of Laws (1758)

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For other English-language translations of this work, see The Spirit of Laws.
  • Volume I. (Table of Contents)
    • The Translator to the Reader
    • Preface
    • Book I. Of Laws in general.
    • Book II. Of Laws directly derived from the Nature of Government.
    • Book III. Of the principles of the three Kinds of Government.
    • Book IV. That the Laws of Education ought to be relative to the Principles of Government.
    • Book V. That the Laws given by the Legislator ought to be relative to the Principle of Government.
    • Book VI. Consequences of the Principles of different Governments with respect to the Simplicity of civil and criminal Laws, the Form of Judgments, and the inflicting of Punishments.
    • Book VII. Consequences of the different Principles of the three Governments with respect to sumptuary Laws, Luxury, and the Condition of Women.
    • Book VIII. Of the Corruption of the Principles of the three Governments.
    • Book IX. Of Laws in the Relation they bear to a defensive Force.
    • Book X. Of Laws in the relation they bear to Offensive Force.
    • Book XI. Of the Laws that form political Liberty, with regard to the Constitution.
    • Book XII. Of the Laws that form political Liberty as relative to the Subject.
    • Book XIII. Of the Relation which the levying of Taxes, and the Greatness of the public Revenues have to Liberty.
    • Book XIV. Of Laws as relative to the Nature of the Climate.
    • Book XV. In what manner the Laws of civil Slavery are relative to the Nature of the Climate.
    • Book XVI. How the Laws of domestic Slavery have a Relation to the Nature of the Climate.
    • Book XVII. How the Laws of political Servitude have a Relation to the Nature of the Climate.
    • Book XVIII. Of Laws in the Relation they bear to the Nature of the Soil.
    • Book XIX. Of Laws in Relation to the Principles which form the general Spirit, the Morals and Customs of a Nation.
  • Volume II.