Author:Florence Earle Coates/Index of Titles

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Index of Titles
Contents: Top - A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Poems (1898)
Pro Patria (1917)
After, as folded card from the Laurel Series, ca. 1910's.
Frederick (1889)
Perdita (on Seeing Miss Anderson in the Rôle) (1889)
"Dreyfus" (1898, 1899), and "Le Grand Salut" (1906)
Picquart (1902)
Du Maurier (1898)
Greatness (1898)
Pilgrim Song (pre-1900): set to music as "The Pilgrims" in 1900
Helen Keller with a Rose (1905). This image inspired the poem.
To R. R. (On Rereading the "De Profundis" of Oscar Wilde) (1912)
In Remembrance: The Antarctic Heroes of 1912 (or, To Britannia)
Rheims (At the Ruined Cathedral) (1916)
The Kaiser (1917)
The Union of the Flags The French High Commission visits Philadelphia on 9 May 1917.

A[edit]

  • Autumn 1898 | 1916 ("We ne'er will part!" Ah me, what plaintive sounds)

B[edit]

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C[edit]

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D[edit]

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E[edit]

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F[edit]

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G[edit]

H[edit]

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I[edit]

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J[edit]

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K[edit]

L[edit]

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M[edit]

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N[edit]

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O[edit]

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P[edit]

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R[edit]

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S[edit]

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T[edit]

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U[edit]

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V[edit]

W[edit]

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Y[edit]

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Notes[edit]

  1. Composer Amy Cheney Beach would set this poem to music, and suggested to Mrs. Coates that one line read, 'After despair and doubting' as opposed to 'After regret and doubting.' Mrs. Coates replied to Mrs. Beach, in a letter written on 8 September 1908, thanking her "sensitive genius for a very great improvement which...[she] will straightway adopt..." [Letters accessed: Amy Cheney Beach Papers, Milne Special Collections, University of New Hampshire Library, Durham NH].
  2. Before the war for the liberation of Cuba. [actual footnote]
  3. The subtitle lines in this poem are from "Boston." by Ralph Waldo Emerson
  4. The "too proud to fight" reference in the second stanza of this poem refers to the words of President Woodrow Wilson from a speech delivered on 10 May 1915 to 4,000 newly naturalized citizens in Convention Hall, Philadelphia. Mr. Wilson stated that "there is such a thing as a man being too proud to fight...as a nation being so right that it does not need to convince others by force that it is right." Mrs. Coates evidently disagreed with Mr. Wilson on that point.
  5. Published as "Nature" in Poems Vol. I (1916).
  6. In the 1905 reprint edition of this poem, line 6 reads, "With token fond, though brief" instead of "To place or flower or leaf" as rendered in the 1904 edition.
  7. On rereading Shelley's "Cenci"
  8. [from Wikipedia] Cendrillon is an opera—described as a "fairy tale"—in four acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Henri Cain based on Perrault's 1698 version of the Cinderella fairy tale.
  9. Published as Winter's Sovereignty in the February 1903 issue of The Era.
  10. Published as Earth Has Her Blossoms in the September 1909 issue of Harper's.
  11. Published as I Looked on Sorrow in the November 1905 issue of the Delineator.
  12. Published as "Che Faro Senza Eurydice!" in the March 1910 issue of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine.
  13. "In their plains the neighing of horses is heard nightly, and men are seen fighting; and those who purposely come as hearers or spectators into these plains suffer for their curiosity; but such as are accidentally witnesses of these prodigies are not injured by the anger of the dæmons. The Marathonians highly honor those that have fallen in battle and give them the appellation of heroes."—Pausanias
  14. "Major Dreyfus, in the name of the Republic and of the people of France, I proclaim you a knight of the Legion of Honour"
  15. Published as "Ode on the Coronation of King George V" in The Unconquered Air and Other Poems (1912)
  16. In the Maternity Ward (Part I of this poem) was subsequently published as a single poem in the October 1913 issue of The Forum with only minor differences in punctuation.
  17. Jean Clemens, daughter of "Mark Twain," died Christmas Eve, 11 A.M., 1909. [actual footnote]
  18. Subsequently published as "The Angelus" in The Home Book of Verse (1912, 1918) and in The Traveler's Book of Verse (1928).
  19. alternate spelling, "Defense" (in 1898 version)
  20. Written by request of the City of Philadelphia for the Peace Celebration and read at Independence Hall, October 28, 1898.
  21. Published as "Nature" in Mine and Thine (1904).
  22. Published as "Natura Benigna" in Poems Vol. I (1916).
  23. Published as "As from Afar" in Mine and Thine (1904).
  24. First published as No More in the 4 Feb 1911 issue of The Outlook.
  25. Published as "Henry V" in Poems Vol. II (1916)
  26. "Written by request of the Pennsylvania Society of Colonial Dames of America and read at Old St. David's, May 21, 1904"
  27. "One hundred million people will experience a thrill of religious enthusiasm at the recent discovery of a relic-casket near Peshawar, India, containing some of the bones of Gautama Buddha."
  28. First published as Onward in the December 1906 issue of The Atlantic Monthly.
  29. Since the bombardment of Strasburg, August 14, 1870, her statue in Paris, representing Alsace, has been draped in mourning by the French people.
  30. as titled in The Reader (January 1907)
  31. Published as "To the Muse" in Poems Vol. II (1916)
  32. "Calbraith Rodgers, acclaimed the world's aviation hero, after an ocean-to-ocean flight of five thousand miles, plunged to his death."
  33. See "La Cité Chinoise" of Eugène Simon. [actual footnote]
  34. Written about painter George Romney; first published as "Who Knocks ?" in the September 1902 issue of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine.
  35. The first stanza of this poem is used by Mrs. Coates in a previously published poem entitled "United"—published in Mine and Thine (1904).
  36. On seeing a picture of the cairn and cross under which lie Captain Scott and his men
  37. First published as In Remembrance : The Antarctic Heroes of 1912 in the July 1913 issue of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine.
  38. Published as To John Luther Long, on seeing his opera "Madame Butterfly" in the June 1912 issue of Book News Monthly.
  39. Published as "Poetry" in Poems (1898)
  40. Published as "Welcome" in Mine and Thine (1904); first published as "Welcome" in the 3 September 1898 issue of The Outlook. Also published as "Welcome to Dewey" in the Life and Heroic Deeds of Admiral Dewey, Including Battles in the Philippines, & etc. (1899) [an alternate title (same text, different title) of Dewey's biography is The Life of Admiral Dewey and the Conquest of the Philippines, & etc. (1899)].
  41. As published in The Anglo-American Magazine V. 7 No. 2 (February 1902)
  42. This poem was cited by the Hon. Isaac Siegel in an "Extension of Remarks" in the Appendix to the Congressional Record (Second Session of the 64th Congress of the United States, Vol. LIV) on 2 March 1917, under the title, "Arming of American Merchant Ships." Mr. Siegel referenced a February 1917 publishing of the poem from The New York Times, but no specific edition of the Times is given.
  43. "The inspired Leader of the Philadelphia Orchestra, on listening to the great Schubert."
  44. "Following our declaration of 'a state of war' with Germany, there came to this country in April, May, June and August [of 1917], successive groups of war commissions from the Entente Allies, which led to probably the most remarkable exchange of international greetings, congratulations, and understandings of which history has any record. The first to arrive were the British, headed by Arthur J. Balfour... A few days later came the French Commission, headed by M. Viviani...and Marshal Joffre..." (Literary Digest History of the World War: Vol. IV, p. 60 [1919].)
  45. This poem as a whole was not included in Mrs. Coates' collected Poems (1916, in 2 vols.); however, the first stanza is reused by Mrs. Coates in a poem entitled "Secure"—published in The Unconquered Air, and Other Poems (1912), and also subsequently in the 1916 2-vol. collection.
  46. Published as "Welcome to Dewey" in the Life and Heroic Deeds of Admiral Dewey, Including Battles in the Philippines, & etc. (1899) [an alternate title (same text, different title) of Dewey's biography is The Life of Admiral Dewey and the Conquest of the Philippines, & etc. (1899)]. Also published as "To the Returning Brave" in Poems Vol. I (1916)
  47. Published as "Welcome to Dewey" in the Life and Heroic Deeds of Admiral Dewey, Including Battles in the Philippines, & etc. (1899) [an alternate title (same text, different title) of Dewey's biography is The Life of Admiral Dewey and the Conquest of the Philippines, & etc. (1899)]. Previously published as "Welcome" in the 3 September 1898 issue of The Outlook; subsequently published as "Welcome" in Mine and Thine (1904), and as "To the Returning Brave" in Poems Vol. I (1916).
  48. Miss Helen Bell was president of the Browning Society of Philadelphia when she died on 11 February 1895. Florence Earle Coates would follow Miss Bell as Society president, and would hold that position successively until 1903.