Ante-Nicene Christian Library/Volume IV

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ANTE-NICENE


CHRISTIAN LIBRARY:


TRANSLATIONS OF
THE WRITINGS OF THE FATHERS

DOWN TO A.D. 325.


EDITED BY THE

REV. ALEXANDER ROBERTS, D.D.,

AND

JAMES DONALDSON, LLD.


VOL. IV.

CLEMENT OF ALEXANDRIA.

VOL. I.


EDINBURGH:
T. AND T. CLARK, 38, GEORGE STREET.


MDCCCLXVII.


EDINBURGH: MURRAY AND GIBB,

PRINTERS TO HER MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE.

THE WRITINGS


OF


CLEMENT OF ALEXANDRIA.


TRANSLATED BY

THE REV. WILLIAM WILSON, M.A.,

MUSSELBURGH.


EDINBURGH:
T. & T. CLARK, 38, GEORGE STEEET.

LONDON: HAMILTON & CO. DUBLIN: JOHN ROBERTSON & CO.

MDCCCLXVII.

CONTENTS.



PAGE
Introductory Notice, 11
EXHORTATION TO THE HEATHEN.
CHAP.
I. Exhortation to abandon the Impious Mysteries of Idolatry for the Adoration of the Divine Word and God the Father, 17
II. The Absurdity and Impiety of the Heathen Mysteries and Fables about the Birth and Death of their Gods, 26
III. The Cruelty of the Sacrifices to the Gods, 48
IV. The Absurdity and Shamefulness of the Images by which the Gods are worshipped, 52
V. The Opinions of the Philosophers respecting God, 66
VI. By Divine Inspiration Philosophers sometimes hit on the Truth, 69
VII. The Poets also bear Testimony to the Truth, 73
VIII. The True Doctrine is to be sought in the Prophets, 76
IX. That those grievously sin who despise or neglect God's gracious Calling, 80
X. Answer to the Objection of the Heathen, that it was not right to abandon the Customs of their Fathers, 85
XI. How great are the Benefits conferred on Man through the Advent of Christ, 100
XII. Exhortation to abandon their Old Errors and listen to the Instructions of Christ, 106
THE INSTRUCTOR
BOOK I.
I. The Office of the Instructor, 113
II. Our Instructor's Treatment of our Sins, 115
III. The Philanthropy of the Instructor, 118
IV. Men and Women alike under the Instructor's Charge, 121
V. All who walk according to Truth are Children of God, 122
VI. The name "Children" does not imply Instruction in Elementary Principles, 131
VII. Who the Instructor is, and respecting His Instruction, 149
VIII. Against those who think that what is just is not good, 155
IX. That it is the Prerogative of the same Power to be beneficent and to punish justly; also, the Manner of the Instruction of the Logos, 164
X. That the same God, by the same Word, restrains from Sin by threatening, and saves Humanity by exhorting, 174
XI. That the Word instructed by the Law and the Prophets, 179
XII. The Instructor characterized by the severity and benignity of Paternal Affection, 181
XIII. Virtue rational, Sin irrational, 184
BOOK II.
I. On Eating, 186
II. On Drinking, 200
III. On Costly Vessels, 211
IV. How to conduct ourselves at Feasts, 215
V. On Laughter, 219
VI. On Filthy Speaking, 222
VII. Directions for those who live together, 225
VIII. On the use of Ointments and Crowns, 230
IX. On Sleep, 240
X. Quænam de procreatione liberorum tractanda sint, 244
XI. On Clothes, 255
XII. On Shoes, 264
XIII. Against excessive Fondness for Jewels and Gold Ornaments, 266
BOOK III.
I. On the True Beauty, 273
II. Against Embellishing the Body, 276
III. Against Men who Embellish themselves, 284
IV. With whom we are to Associate, 292
V. Behaviour in the Baths, 296
VI. The Christian alone Rich, 298
VII. Frugality a good Provision for the Christian, 301
VIII. Similitudes and Examples a most important part of right Instruction, 304
IX. Why we are to use the Bath, 308
X. The Exercises suited to a good Life, 310
XI. A Compendious View of the Christian Life, 313
   Clothes, 313
Ear-rings, 315
Finger-rings, 315
The Hair, 317
Painting the Face, 319
Walking, 324
The Model Maiden, 325
Amusements and Associates, 325
Public Spectacles, 326
Religion in Ordinary Life, 327
Going to Church, 328
Out of Church, 329
Love, and the Kiss of Charity, 329
The Government of the Eyes, 330
XII. Continuation, with Texts from Scripture, 332
Prayer to the Pædagogus, 342
A Hymn to Christ the Saviour, 343
To the Pædagogus, 346
THE MISCELLANIES; OR, STROMATA.
BOOK I.
I. Preface—The Author's Object—The Utility of Written Compositions, 349
II. Objections to the Number of Extracts from Philosophical Writings in these Books, Anticipated and Answered, 360
III. Against the Sophists, 362
IV. Human Arts, as well as Divine Knowledge, proceed from God, 364
V. Philosophy the Handmaid of Theology, 366
VI. The Benefit of Culture, 371
VII. The Eclectic Philosophy paves the way for Divine Virtue, 374
VIII. The Sophistical Arts useless, 376
IX. Human Knowledge necessary for the Understanding of the Scriptures, 379
X. To Act well of greater consequence than to Speak well, 381
XI. What is the Philosophy which the Apostle bids us shun? 384
XII. The Mysteries of the Faith not to be divulged to All, 388
XIII. All Sects of Philosophy contain a Germ of Truth, 389
XIV. Succession of Philosophers in Greece, 391
XV. The Greek Philosophy in great part derived from the Barbarians, 395
XVI. That the Inventors of other Arts were mostly Barbarians, 401
XVII. On the saying of the Saviour, "All that came before Me were thieves and robbers," 406
XVIII. He illustrates the Apostle's saying, "I will destroy the wisdom of the wise," 410
XIX. That the Philosophers have attained to some portion of Truth, 413
XX. In what respect Philosophy contributes to the comprehension of Divine Truth, 418
XXI. The Jewish Institutions and Laws of far higher Antiquity than the Philosophy of the Greeks, 421
XXII. On the Greek Translation of the Old Testament, 448
XXIII. The Age, Birth, and Life of Moses, 450
XXIV. How Moses discharged the Part of a Military Leader, 455
XXV. Plato an Imitator of Moses in Framing Laws, 459
XXVI. Moses rightly called a Divine Legislator, and, though inferior to Christ, far superior to the great Legislators of the Greeks, Minos and Lycurgus, 461
XXVII. The Law, even in Correcting and Punishing, aims at the Good of Men, 464
XXVIII. The Fourfold Division of the Mosaic Law, 467
XXIX. The Greeks but Children compared with the Hebrews, 469


This work was published before January 1, 1924, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.