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Index:Pictures of life in Mexico Vol 2.djvu

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Pictures of life in Mexico Vol 2.djvu

 







CONTENTS OF VOL. II.

CHAPTER XXII.
THE ARRIERO, OR CARRIER.
Varieties of Mexican scenery—Difficulties of travelling—A wayside cross—Tropical trees and snowy mountains—The valley of Mexico—Transmission of goods—Newspapers—Postal communication—Mexican carriers—Adventure of an arriero—A discovery—An escape—A band of ladrones
page 1
CHAPTER XXIII.
A FERIA, OR FAIR.
Their characteristics in different districts—Number of annual fairs—Chinampas, or floating gardens—Mexican pedlars—Sale by measurement—Juggler and serpent charmer—Dancing girls—Perambulating restaurateurs—Vendors of stolen goods—Temporary theatres—Padres and lookers-on—Pronunciamientos—An insurrection.
18
CHAPTER XXIV.
SEA-PORTS.
Unhealthiness of Mexican ports—Country round Vera Cruz—Natural productions—Harbour of Vera Cruz—St. Juan de Ulloa—Rainy season—City of Vera Cruz—Commerce of the port-harbour of Tampico—Surrounding country—Matamoras—Acapulco—San Bias—Mazatlan—Port dues and other charges—Custom-house officers—Amusing incident
34
CHAPTER XXV.
CITIES AND PROVINCES.
Valley of Mexico—Lakes—Principal Roads—Old City of Tenochtitlan—New City—City of Mexico—Puebla—Xalapa—Perote—Gueretaro—Guanajuato—Zacatecas—Durango—Santa Fé—Caneles—Tamazula—Cuernavoca—Cuautla—Yucatan—Tabasco—Chiapa—Vera Paz.
51
CHAPTER XXVI.
INDEPENDENT MEXICANS.
National pride—Patronizing manners—Drunken independence—A swaggering postilion—Braggadocio and abasement—The adventures of an intoxicated family group.
62
CHAPTER XXVII.
INCIDENT AT A PUEBLO.
Story of an old alcalde—Life in an isolated hamlet—Indian cattle stealers—The savages' revenge—The padre and his household—Terrible storm—Hacienda set on fire by Indians—Horrible slaughter—Escape of prisoners.
74
CHAPTER XXVIII.
MEXICAN HACIENDAS, OR FARMS.
Character of scenery—State of agriculture—Fences, implements, and crops—A hacienda—The agave, or maguey plant—Mode of obtaining pulque—The Vaquero, or cow-herd—A. lazy brute and his canine companion—Seeking stray sheep.
85
CHAPTER XXIX.
A PLANTATION ANECDOTE
Culture of tobacco—A plantation—Processes at a tobacco factory—Rival planters—Malicious dilapidation—Destructive reprisal—Duel between the rival proprietors.
99
CHAPTER XXX.
WILD-CATTLE HUNTERS.
Dexterity in lassoing—Cattle-hunters' fare—Defence of wild cattle against wolves—Inducements to hunters—Departure for a cargo of hides—Sunset on the prairie—The hunter's terrible dream—A perilous position—Combat and retreat—Struggle in the water—Safe deliverance.
107
CHAPTER CHAPTER XXXI.
SNAKE-HUNTING.
Forest paths—A narrow escape—Mule killed by a serpent—Snake hunters and their implements—A trophy of the chase—Snake hunter's song
121
CHAPTER XXXII.
A SONG TO THE VIRGIN.
Travellers' anticipations—Beauties of Mexican scenery—Mountain passes—Tropical trees and flowers—River scene—Distant view—Music at twilight—Song to the Virgin
126
CHAPTER XXXIII.
TREASURE-SEEKERS AND CONTRABANDISTAS.
Mestizo digging for treasure—Hopes and misfortunes of Lope Cluca—Unexpected discovery—Robbery planned—The diamond recovered—Proceedings of contrabandistas
132
CHAPTER XXXIV.
A MONKEY ANECDOTE.
Habits of monkeys—Their sociality—Treatment of each other—Crossing a stream—A serpent's breakfast—The monkeys' manoeuvre to revenge their comrade—The snake destroyed
152
CHAPTER XXXV.
ANCIENT AZTEC TEMPLES AND WORSHIP.
Manner of addressing priests—Formation of lengthy Aztec words—Temples and idols—Great temple of Teocalli, its square wall, gates, and threshold gods—Initiatory chapel and its accessories—Square for religious dances—Dimensions of temple—Steps and balustrade of different stories—Platform and holy towers—Vessels for sacred fire—Minor chapels—Religious sacrifices—Gods of providence and war—Colossal female idol—Ancient worship.
160
CHAPTER XXXVI.
MEXICAN GOVERNMENT AND CONSTITUTION.
A troubled period—Present constitution—Privileges of citizens—Legislative power—Qualifications of president—Government council—Judicial power—Elections—Events prior and subsequent to formation of this constitution.
173
CHAPTER XXXVII.
COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH GREAT BRITAIN.
Articles of amity and commerce—Ships of war and post-office packets—Importation duties—Tonnage and pilotage—Regulations for vessels and prizes—Passports—Personal liberty—Property and estates—Unlading of goods—Resident consuls—Safe-conduct—Religion—Former convention—Abolition of the slave-trade—Additional articles for the benefit of Mexican commerce.
178
CHAPTER XXXVIII.
COMMERCE OF MEXICO.
Causes of its decline—Revenues—Imports and exports—Average commercial returns for one year from Vera Cruz, Tampico, Matamoras, San Blas, and Mazatlan—Statement of charges on foreign shipping—Example of tonnage duty.
196
CHAPTER XXXIX.
MEXICAN COMMERCE—COTTON MANUFACTURE.
Manufactures under the old Spanish Government—Amount of exports and imports—Account and statistics of cotton manufacture—Mexican cotton crops—Average prices—Water power—Puebla—Climate and raw material—Table of Mexican weights and measures—Table of coinage
207
CHAPTER XL.
COMMERCIAL REGULATIONS PROHIBITIONS, AND IMPORT DUTIES.
Admission of vessels—Number of ports open to foreign commerce—Goods free of duties—Invoices—List of prohibited articles—Exempted articles—Measurement of goods—List of duties in Mexican and British monies, on admitted articles—Articles of flax, &c.—Wood, &c.—Silks—Of cotton manufacture
221
CHAPTER XLI.
PASSPORTS AND PENALTIES.
Rules for register of passengers—Written report of foreigners—Restrictions on entering the country—Carta de Seguridad, or card of safety—Penalties on violating regulations for shipment—Penalties on false money
246
CONCLUDING CHAPTER.
Striking features of the country—Motives for exposition of facts—Physical weakness of the people—Want of mental energy—Isolation and prohibitory duties—House and land rents—Financial difficulties—Various classes—State of the fine arts—The army, trade, law, and medicine—Social qualities—Literature, language, and education—Political future
253