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Featured texts
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A featured text is one which is recognized as among the most complete and highest quality works on Wikisource. These are prominently displayed on the main page, inviting users to read at their leisure.


Featured texts edit
Date Text
2017
January Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (Wiggin)
February The Clandestine Marriage
March The "Bab" Ballads
April Pro Patria (Coates)
May The Panchatantra (Purnabhadra's Recension of 1199 CE)
June Australian Legendary Tales
July Resistance to Civil Government
August Views in India, chiefly among the Himalaya Mountains
September The Subjection of Women
October A Princess of Mars
November Prometheus Bound
December Author:Beatrix Potter
Notes
  1. The Black Cat was originally featured, but this is now a disambiguation page, and featured status has been transferred to Tales (Poe)/The Black Cat.

Current featured text

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Beatrix Potter (28 July 1866 – 22 December 1943) was an English author best known for her series of illustrated children's books known as the Tales of Beatrix Potter. Twenty-three titles were published between 1902 and 1930, beginning with The Tale of Peter Rabbit, which would become one of the best-selling books of all time. A twenty-fourth manuscript, The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots, was discovered in 2015 and published in 2016 to mark the 150th anniversary of her birth.

The immense popularity of Potter's books was based on the lively quality of her illustrations, the non-didactic nature of her stories, the depiction of the rural countryside, and the imaginative qualities she lent to her animal characters. Potter's sense for business resulted in considerable commercial success in licensed merchandise as well.

The tale of Pigling Bland pg 8.jpg

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Past featured text

"The Clipper Ship Era", a 1911 history book by former sea captain Arthur Hamilton Clark.

Clark's history represents the pinnacle of wooden sailing ships in the mid-nineteenth century (1843–1869). The period is illustrated through "biographies" of some of the greatest ships of the day and accounts of their races across oceans to get their cargo, from tea to opium, to market.

East Indiamen 1720 24b.jpg

The Clipper Ship Era began in 1843 as a result of the growing demand for a more rapid delivery of tea from China; continued under the stimulating influence of the discovery of gold in California and Australia in 1849 and 1851, and ended with the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869. These memorable years form one of the most important and interesting periods of maritime history. They stand between the centuries during which man navigated the sea with sail and oar—a slave to unknown winds and currents, helpless alike in calm and in storm—and the successful introduction of steam navigation, by which man has obtained mastery upon the ocean.

After countless generations of evolution, this era witnessed the highest development of the wooden sailing ship in construction, speed, and beauty. Nearly all the clipper ships made records which were not equalled by the steamships of their day; and more than a quarter of a century elapsed, devoted to discovery and invention in perfecting the marine engine and boiler, before the best clipper ship records for speed were broken by steam vessels. During this era, too, important discoveries were made in regard to the laws governing the winds and currents of the ocean; and this knowledge, together with improvements in model and rig, enabled sailing ships to reduce by forty days the average time formerly required for the outward and homeward voyage from England and America to Australia.

(Read on...)
Featured February 2014

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