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A featured text is one which is recognized as among the most complete and highest quality works on Wikisource. These are prominently displayed on the main page, inviting users to read at their leisure.


Featured texts edit
Date Text
2017
January Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm
February The Clandestine Marriage
March The "Bab" Ballads
April Pro Patria (Coates)
May The Panchatantra (Purnabhadra's Recension of 1199 CE)
June Australian Legendary Tales
July Resistance to Civil Government
August Views in India, chiefly among the Himalaya Mountains
September
October A Princess of Mars
November
December Author:Beatrix Potter
Notes
  1. The Black Cat was originally featured, but this is now a disambiguation page, and featured status has been transferred to Tales (Poe)/The Black Cat.

Current featured text

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Australian Legendary Tales (1896) collected and translated by K. Langloh Parker.

This book is a collection of stories told to K. Langloh Parker by Aboriginal people of Australia. The volume includes over 30 tales, along with a glossary and the first tale transliterated from the original language. Stories are set in a 'no-time' where animal spirits, supernatural beings, and humans interact, often alluding to ideas of creation. The book was immediately popular, being revised or reissued several times since, and is notable as the first substantial representation of the Australian Aboriginal belief system to the rest of the world.

Australian-legendary-tales-cover.png

Dinewan the emu, being the largest bird, was acknowledged as king by the other birds. The Goomblegubbons, the bustards, were jealous of the Dinewans. Particularly was Goomblegubbon, the mother, jealous of the Dinewan mother. She would watch with envy the high flight of the Dinewans, and their swift running. And she always fancied that the Dinewan mother flaunted her superiority in her face, for whenever Dinewan alighted near Goomblegubbon, after a long, high flight, she would flap her big wings and begin booing in her pride, not the loud booing of the male bird, but a little, triumphant, satisfied booing noise of her own, which never failed to irritate Goomblegubbon when she heard it.

Goomblegubbon used to wonder how she could put an end to Dinewan's supremacy. She decided that she would only be able to do so by injuring her wings and checking her power of flight. But the question that troubled her was how to effect this end. She knew she would gain nothing by having a quarrel with Dinewan and fighting her, for no Goomblegubbon would stand any chance against a Dinewan. There was evidently nothing to be gained by an open fight. She would have to effect her end by cunning.

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Past featured text

"Magic" by Ellis Stanyon.

Stanyon was one of Britain's finest sleight-of-hand exponents in the twentieth century. In this book he gives detailed instructions on how to perform well-known illusions, as well as many new ones of his own invention. There is also a chapter on Shadowgraphy.

Fig. 3 Magic Stanyon.jpg
There are one or two leading principles to be borne in mind by any one taking up the study of magic. The first and foremost is, Never tell the audience what you are going to do before you do it. If you do, the chances of detection are increased tenfold, as the spectators, knowing what to expect, will the more readily arrive at the true method of bringing about the result.

It follows as a natural consequence that you must never perform the same trick twice in the same evening. It is very unpleasant to have to refuse an encore; and should you be called upon to repeat a trick study to vary it as much as possible, and to bring it to a different conclusion. There will generally be found more ways than one of working a particular trick. It is an axiom in conjuring that the best trick loses half its effect on repetition.

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Featured July 2013

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