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Featured texts
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A featured text is one which is recognized as among the most complete and highest quality works on Wikisource. These are prominently displayed on the main page, inviting users to read at their leisure.


Featured texts edit
Date Text
2017
January Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm
February The Clandestine Marriage
March The "Bab" Ballads
April Pro Patria (Coates)
May The Panchatantra (Purnabhadra's Recension of 1199 CE)
June Australian Legendary Tales
July Resistance to Civil Government
August Views in India, chiefly among the Himalaya Mountains
September
October
November
December Author:Beatrix Potter
Notes
  1. The Black Cat was originally featured, but this is now a disambiguation page, and featured status has been transferred to Tales (Poe)/The Black Cat.

Current featured text

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The "Bab" Ballads is a collection of light verse by W. S. Gilbert, and is illustrated with his own comic drawings. The Ballads contain both satire and nonsense, as well as a great deal of utter absurdity. They were read aloud at private dinner-parties, public banquets, and even in the House of Lords.

In writing the Ballads, Gilbert developed his signature "topsy-turvy" style, where the humour was derived by setting up a ridiculous premise and working out its logical consequences, however absurd. They also reveal Gilbert's cynical and satirical approach to humour. The collection became famous on its own, as well as being a source for plot elements, characters, and songs that would be recycled in the Gilbert and Sullivan operas.

Bab Ballads 013.png

OF all the ships upon the blue,
No ship contained a better crew
Than that of worthy Captain Reece,
Commanding of The Mantelpiece.

He was adored by all his men,
For worthy Captain Reece, R.N.,
Did all that lay within him to
Promote the comfort of his crew.

If ever they were dull or sad,
Their captain danced to them like mad,
Or told, to make the time pass by,
Droll legends of his infancy.

(Read on...)

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Past featured text

Theodore Roosevelt wrote this resignation letter to the Mayor of New York, ceding his position as President of the New York Police Department, on 17 April 1897.

     I herewith tender you my resignation to take effect on April 19th. in accordance with our understanding.
     I wish to take this opportunity, sir, to thank you for appointing me,and to express my very deep appreciation of your attitude toward me, and toward the force, the direction of which you in part entrusted to my care. We have been very intimately associated with your work and I know, as all men who have been associated with you do know, the devotion with which you have given all of your time and all of your efforts to the betterment of our civic conditions, and the single mindedness with which at every crisis you have sought merely the good of the City. I have been able to work so zealously under you because you have never required of me but loyal service to what you conceived to be the best interest of New York City, and I well know that had I followed any other course it would have met with instant and sharp rebuke from you. (Read on.)

Featured March 2007

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