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Featured texts
A featured text is one which is recognized as among the most complete and highest quality works on Wikisource. These are prominently displayed on the main page, inviting users to read at their leisure.

Featured texts edit
Date Text
February The Kiss and its History
April The Descent of Man (Darwin)
June The Fables of Florian (tr. Phelps)
July The Discovery of Radium
September The Adventures Of A Revolutionary Soldier
December Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm
  1. The Black Cat was originally featured, but this is now a disambiguation page, and featured status has been transferred to Tales (Poe)/The Black Cat.

Current featured text

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"Calcutta: Past and Present" by Kathleen Blechynden, published in 1905, lays before the reader a vivid picture in lucid style of the colonial Calcutta, then capital of British India, from its initial days at the time of Job Charnock till the time of Warren Hastings, the first governor-general of India. Adorned with rare engravings and photographs, this work was written by a British lady from a somewhat unusual perspective. In the author's own words, "My aim has not been to give any account of the great deeds by which the men of old Calcutta laid the foundations of the British Empire in the East, but rather to try and depict the lives they led, their daily cares and amusements, the wives and daughters who lightened their exile, the houses in which they dwelt, the servants who waited on them, the food they ate, the wines they drank, the scenes amid which they moved, the graves in which they laid their loved ones or sank themselves to rest."

A DAY in August in the height of the rainy season in Bengal. The muddy waters of the Hughly, beaten level by the ceaseless downpour of the rain descending in heavy unbroken rush, heaved sullenly in thick turbid swell, rising higher and ever higher as the strong downward current was met and checked by the force of the rising tide, rushing in from the distant sea. In the great circling whirlpools formed by the opposing forces, the bloated carcases of drowned animals, great branches of trees, or whole trees with a tangled mass of roots, swept round, lashed by the rain and whirling flood into semblance of some living monster, stretching octopus-like arms. Once and again would sweep by a human form, charred from the funeral pyre, borne on the rushing waters of the sacred stream to meet its final dissolution, devoured by the alligators, vultures, crows, and jackals who haunted the river waves and shores in watchful eagerness for their prey.
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Past featured text

The Flight 93 Cockpit Transcript records the final conversations aboard United Airlines Flight #93, one of four airlines hijacked on 11 September 2001. It was the only one of the four planes that did not reach its intended target, instead crashing in an empty field about 150 miles northwest of Washington, D.C. Based partially on the evidence of this transcript, the 9/11 Commission concluded that the hijackers crashed the plane to keep the crew and passengers from gaining control of the airplane.

Flight Recorders.jpg
Time (EDT) Transcript


Ladies and gentlemen: Here the captain, please sit down keep remaining seating. We have a bomb on board. So sit.


Er, uh…Calling Cleveland Center…You're unreadable. Say again slowly.


Don't move. Shut up.

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Featured September 2009

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