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A featured text is one which is recognized as among the most complete and highest quality works on Wikisource. These are prominently displayed on the main page, inviting users to read at their leisure.


Featured texts edit
Date Text
2017
January Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (Wiggin)
February The Clandestine Marriage
March The "Bab" Ballads
April Pro Patria (Coates)
May The Panchatantra (Purnabhadra's Recension of 1199 CE)
June Australian Legendary Tales
July Resistance to Civil Government
August Views in India, chiefly among the Himalaya Mountains
September The Subjection of Women
October A Princess of Mars
November Prometheus Bound
December Author:Beatrix Potter
Notes
  1. The Black Cat was originally featured, but this is now a disambiguation page, and featured status has been transferred to Tales (Poe)/The Black Cat.

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A Princess of Mars is a science fantasy novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The story was first published in hardcover in October, 1917, although it previously had been serialized in a pulp magazine in 1912. The novel became the first of Burroughs' "Barsoom" series, relating the adventures of Captain John Carter on the planet Mars.
Princess of Mars frontipsiece.jpg

I AM a very old man; how old I do not know. Possibly I am a hundred, possibly more; but I cannot tell because I have never aged as other men, nor do I remember any childhood. So far as I can recollect I have always been a man, a man of about thirty. I appear today as I did forty years and more ago, and yet I feel that I cannot go on living forever; that some day I shall die the real death from which there is no resurrection. I do not know why I should fear death, I who have died twice and am still alive; but yet I have the same horror of it as you who have never died, and it is because of this terror of death, I believe, that I am so convinced of my mortality.

And because of this conviction I have determined to write down the story of the interesting periods of my life and of my death. I cannot explain the phenomena; I can only set down here in the words of an ordinary soldier of fortune a chronicle of the strange events that befell me during the ten years that my dead body lay undiscovered in an Arizona cave.

I have never told this story, nor shall mortal man see this manuscript until after I have passed over for eternity. I know that the average human mind will not believe what it cannot grasp, and so I do not purpose being pilloried by the public, the pulpit, and the press, and held up as a colossal liar when I am but telling the simple truths which some day science will substantiate. Possibly the suggestions which I gained upon Mars, and the knowledge which I can set down in this chronicle will aid in an earlier understanding of the mysteries of our sister planet; mysteries to you, but no longer mysteries to me.

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Early Settlers Along the Mississippi is one of many essays by John James Audubon that were included in the letterpress of his 1831 Ornithological Biography. The essays were not present in later printings but this one was printed in various other collections such as Southern Life in Southern Literature (1917) by Maurice Garland Fulton.

Although every European traveler who has glided down the Mississippi at the rate of ten miles an hour has told his tale of the squatters, yet none has given any other account of them than that they are "a sallow, sickly-looking sort of miserable being," living in swamps and subsisting on pignuts, Indian corn, and bear's flesh. It is obvious, however, that none but a person acquainted with their history, manners, and condition can give any real information respecting them.

The individuals who become squatters choose that sort of life of their own free will. They mostly remove from other parts of the United States after finding that land has become too high in price, and they are persons who, having a family of strong and hardy children, are anxious to enable them to provide for themselves. They have heard from good authorities that the country extending along the great streams of the West is of all parts of the Union the richest in its soil, the growth of its timber, and the abundance of its game; that, besides, the Mississippi is the great road to and from all the markets in the world; and that every vessel borne by its waters affords to settlers some chance of selling their commodities, or of exchanging them for others. (Read on...)

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