The Jewish Manual

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The Jewish Manual  (1846) 
by Judith Cohen Montefiore

CONTENTS.




PART I.

INTRODUCTION.

page.

Miscellaneous Observations for the use of the Cook




CHAPTER I.

Soups

1


CHAPTER II.
Sauces and Forcemeat

17


CHAPTER III.

Fish

37


CHAPTER IV.
Meats and Poultry cooked in various ways

49


CHAPTER V.

Vegetables, Omelettes, Fondeaux, Croquettes, Risoles, &c.

90


CHAPTER VI.

Pastry

103


CHAPTER VII.

Sweet Dishes, Puddings, Jellies, Creams, Charlottes, Soufles, Gateaux, Trifles, Custards, Cakes, &c.

112


CHAPTER VIII.

Preserves and Bottling

161


CHAPTER IX.

Pickling

169


CHAPTER X.

Recipes for Invalids

175

Appendix

182



THE TOILETTE.




CHAPTER I.

The Complexion, &c., &c.

193


CHAPTER II.

The Hair

195


CHAPTER III.

The Teeth

208


CHAPTER IV.

The Hands and Nails

211


CHAPTER V.

Dress

214


CHAPTER VI.

Effects of Diet on the Complexion

215


CHAPTER VII.

Influence of the Mind as regards Beauty

231



GLOSSARY.




Aspie, a term used for savoury jelly, in which cold poultry, meat, &c., is often served.

Bain-Marie. This is a large pan filled with boiling water, in which several saucepans can be placed when their contents are required to be kept hot without boiling—this is a useful article in a kitchen, where the manner in which sauces are prepared is considered deserving of attention.
Béchamel, a superior kind of white sauce, used in French cookery.
Blanquette, a kind of fricassee with a white sauce.
Bola-d'amour, a very rich and expensive Spanish confection.
Bolas, a kind of rich cake or pudding.

Cassereet, a sauce prepared from the cassada, a West Indian plant—it must be used with moderation.
Casserole, a name given to a crust formed of rice baked, and then filled with mince, fricassee, or fruit.
Chorissa, a sausage peculiar to the Jewish kitchen, of delicate and piquante flavour.
Consommé, is a term now used for stock—it is a clear strong broth, forming the basis of all soups, sauces, gravies, &c.
Croquettes and Risoles; preparations of forcemeat, formed into fancy shapes, and fried.
Croutons, sippets of bread or toast, to garnish hashes, salmis, &c., are so called.

Doce, a mixture of sugar with almonds or cocoa-nut.

Entrées. These are side-dishes, for the first course, consisting of cutlets, vol au vents, fricassees, fillets, sweetbreads, salmis, scallops, &c., &c.
Entremets. These are side-dishes for the second course; they comprise dressed vegetables, puddings, gateaux, pastries, fritters, creams, jellies, timbales, &c.

Farcie, a French term for forcemeat; it is a mixture of savoury ingredients, used for croquettes, balls, &c. Meat is by no means a necessary ingredient, although the English word might seem to imply the contrary.
Fondeaux, and Fondus, are savoury kinds of souflés.
Fricandeaux, a term for small well-trimmed pieces of meat, stewed in various ways.
Fricassee. This is a name used for delicate stews, when the articles are cut in pieces.
Fricandelles. These are very small fricandeaux, two or three of which are served on one dish, and they sometimes also are delicate, but highly-flavoured minces, formed into any approved shapes.
Flanks are large standing side-dishes.

Gateaux, is a kind of cake or pudding.

Hors d'œunes. These are light entrees in the first course; they are sometimes called assietes volantes; they are handed during the first course; they comprise anchovies, fish salads, patties of various kinds, croquettes, risolles, maccaroni, &c.

Maigre, made without meat.
Matso, Passover cakes.
Miroton, a savoury preparation of veal or poultry, formed in a mould.

Nouilles, a kind of vermicelli paste.

Piqué, a French term used to expresss the process of larding. The French term is a preferable one, as it more clearly indicates what is meant,
Purée is a term given to a preparation of meat or vegetables, reduced to a pulp, and mixed with any kind of sauce, to the consistency of thick cream. Purées of vegetables are much used in modern cookery, to serve with cutlets, callops, &c.

Ramekin, a savoury and delicate preparation of cheese, generally served in fringed paper cases.
Releves, or Removes, are top and bottom dishes, which replace the soup and fish.

Salmis, a hash, only a superior kind, being more delicately seasoned, and usually made of cold poultry.

Souflés, a term applied to a a very light kind of pudding, made with some farinaceous substance, and generally replaces the roast of a second course.

Timbale, a shape of maccaroni or rice made in a mould.

Vol-au-vent. This is a sort of case, made of very rich puff paste, filled with delicate fricassee of fish, meat, or poultry, or richly stewed fruits.

Vélouté, an expensive white sauce.



See also[edit]