Tragedies of Sophocles (Plumptre 1878)

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THE TRAGEDIES OF

SOPHOCLES


A NEW TRANSLATION, WITH A BIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY,
AND AN APPENDIX OF RHYMED CHORAL ODES AND LYRICAL DIALOGUES




By E. H. PLUMPTRE, D.D.

PROFESSOR OF DIVINITY, KING'S COLLEGE, LONDON; VICAR OF BICKLEY;
PREBENDARY OF ST. PAUL'S




LONDON
DALDY, ISBISTER & CO.
56, LUDGATE HILL
1878

 

 

TO

CONNOP THIRLWALL, D.D.

LORD BISHOP OF ST DAVID'S,


AND


TO THE MEMORY OF

JULIUS CHARLES HARE, M.A.


Friends in your boyhood, when the dawn was bright,
Friends in the heat and burden of the day,
Friends even yet, though one has passed away
To join the children of the Lord of Light!
Long since ye roamed each vale, and climbed each height,
Where songs of Hellas float through golden grove,
Or from the hill of Capitolian Jove,
Tracked the young stream of Rome's imperial might.
Our friend and brother heareth loftier praise;
But thou, kind teacher, speakest to us still,
And wilt not scorn, scant offering though they be,
These echoes of high thoughts of ancient days.
Ah! would the power were equal with the will!
Would that my faltering speech were worthier thee!


Llandilo, August 29th, 1865.

 

 

By the same Author.




THE TRAGEDIES OF ÆSCHYLOS.

A NEW TRANSLATION, WITH A BIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY AND AN APPENDIX OF RHYMED CHORUSES.

Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d.

"Mr. Plumptre pits himself with more and abler rivals than when he essayed Sophocles; and here, too, we are of opinion that he will be found to hold his own. . . . Taken as a whole, it is impossible to weigh Mr. Plumptre's version beside these without rising from the task impressed with the uniform high level which he maintains, and with the care, skill, acuteness, and genius which save him from inferiority to any of the translators before-named."—Contemporary Review.




LAZARUS AND OTHER POEMS.

Small 8vo, 5s.

"Polished and often beautiful verse. . . . A scholar's reading of the religion of the times clothed in the rhythm and music of a poetical mind. The gem of the book is the striking translation of the Song of Deborah."—Spectator.

"Mr. Plumptre has tried a very daring experiment, and, in our judgment, has succeeded."—Reader.

"Rich in the results of modern culture; . . . beyond mistake the outpourings of an earnest and affectionate mind."—Guardian.




THEOLOGY AND LIFE:

SERMONS ON SPECIAL OCCASIONS.

Small 8vo, 6s.

"Earnest, clear, eloquent, . . adhering to the old formulæ."—Spectator.

"Always earnest, always devout, and never afraid to meet a new thought."—Church and State Review.

"Vigorous in thought and unconventional in manner, faithful, earnest, and sound in the faith. . . . At once scholarly, instructive, and practical."—British Quarterly Review.

"It is long since we have read a volume of sermons which maintains so high a level of thought, feeling, and expression. . . . If the writer attempts to take up a position of mediation and reconciliation between contending extremes, it is in no unworthy spirit of accommodation."—Theological Review.

"As a whole, this volume presents in a high degree that combination of wise and conscientious exposition of scriptural truth with the practical enforcement of its lessons, which alone could justify, as indeed it does amply justify, the title selected by the author."—Nonconformist.

 

 

MASTER AND SCHOLAR, Etc., Etc.

Small 8vo, 5s.

"Professor Plumptre's new volume will certainly add to his reputation. It is worthy to be put on the same shelf with Heber and his own favourite Keble,"—Westminster Review.

"The present volume, of great outward and visible elegance, and of great inward and intellectual grace, offers abundant evidence of the author's poetical gifts."—Illustrated Landon News.

"The exceedingly able article in the Contemporary Review for July, 1866, by the same author, on Friar Bacon, should be read as a commentary and introduction to this poem (Master and Scholar). . . . With exquisite delicacy Mr. Plumptre pours forth once more the pitiful wail of poor Eloisa's broken heart over the idol of her passion, . . . and weaves the traditions of the Magdalen into a charming poem."—British Quarterly Review.




CHRIST AND CHRISTENDOM:

THE BOYLE LECTURES FOR 1866.

Demy 8vo, 12s.

"They will stand not unworthily by the side of those produced by Professor Plumptre's most eminent predecessors. In them he displays, with rare force and constant readiness, all the resources of a ripe scholar, a keen critic, and an eloquent writer."—Athenæum.

"A learned, thoughtful, and candid book, able in a literary sense, catholic in tone and spirit, full of the minute study and special knowledge of a life devoted to divinity."—Spectator.




BIBLICAL STUDIES.

Post 8vo, 5s.

"We have seen few books which will serve more efficiently to give life and body to ordinary people's conceptions of biblical characters, events, and narratives."—Literary Churchman.

"An admirable specimen of what biblical exegesis ought to be. There is many a man who thinks himself pretty well acquainted with the Bible to whom the book will be a revelation of ignorance for which he was little prepared, and an incentive to carry on studies which may yield abundant and precious results."—Literary World.




DALDY, ISBISTER & CO., 56, LUDGATE HILL, E.C.