Library-logo-blue-outline.png
View-refresh.svg
Transclusion_Status_Detection_Tool

Index:Christianity in China, Tartary, and Thibet Volume II.djvu

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Christianity in China, Tartary, and Thibet Volume II.djvu

Pages   (key to Page Status)   

Cvr Blk Blk Blk Blk Blk Blk Ttl Ttl Blk Con Con Con Con 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043 044 045 046 047 048 049 050 051 052 053 054 055 056 057 058 059 060 061 062 063 064 065 066 067 068 069 070 071 072 073 074 075 076 077 078 079 080 081 082 083 084 085 086 087 088 089 090 091 092 093 094 095 096 097 098 099 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 Ttl Blk Blk Blk Blk Blk Cvr

O V ,- ^ CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME. CHAPTER I. Iiilliic-nce of the Catholic Missions of the Middle Ages upon European Civilisation. — Origin of the Lama Hierarchy and the Ceremonies, of the Buddhist Faith. — Vasco de Gama doubles the Cape of Good Hope. — Portuguese Establishment on the Coast of Malabar. — First Conquests of the Portuguese as related by a Syrian Monk. — /The Portuguese undertake the Discovery of the Cathay of Marco Polo. — They land at Canton. — Embassy of Thomas Pircs to Pekin. — Deplorable Issue of the Undertaking. — Fran9oi3 Xavier resolves to convert the Chinese to Christianity. — After many adverse Accidents he reaches the Isle of Sancian. — Death of St. Francois Xavier in sight of Ciiina. — Gaspard de la Croix, the first Missionary who penetrated into the Celestial Empire. — Commercial Relations of the Portuguese and Chinese. — Establish- ment of Macao. — Father Roger. — Father Matthieu Ricci. — First JNIission in the Province of Kouang-Si - - Page 1 CHAP. II. The Missionaries ai-e forced to abandoa Tchao-Klng. — Return to Macao. — New and fruitless Efforts to re-enter the Empire. — The Viceroy recalls Fathers Roger and Ricci to Tchao-King. — Grant of Land to build a House and Church. — Buddhist Towers. — Pagodas. — Success and Hopes of the Missionaries. — Erection of a Chapel Preludes to preaching the Gospel. — A dying Man baptized. — Interpretation of Christian Charity by Letters. — Success and Persecution. — Ricci applies himself to the Sciences and Letters.— ^Singular Map of the World in the Chinese Taste. — Completion oflHe'Church. — Attempt at a Spanish Embassy to Pekin. — Two more Missionaries in the Interior. — Journey of Father Roger to Han-Tcheou-Fou. — Chinese Alchemists. — Ras- cality of the Neophyte Martin. — His Judgment. — Fresh Persecution. — Peace returns. — Fete of old Men. — Memorial against the Euro- peans. — Defence of Father Ricci. — His Popularity. — Solemn Visit of the Imperial Commissioner to the Mission of Tchao-King 45 VI CONTENTS OF CHAR III. The Missionaries expelled from Tchao-King. — Farewell of the Christians. — Refusal of Indemnity. — Establisliment at Tcliao- Tcheou. — Monastery of the Flower of the South. — Founder of tliis Monastery Fatlier Ricci refuses to lodge in it. — He founds an Establishment not far from Tchao-Tcheou. — First and singular Disciple of Father Ricci. — The Missionaries change the Costume of the Bonzes for that of the lettered Class. — Father Ricci sets off for Pekin. — Accidents on the Road. — Arrival at Nankin. — Returns to the Capital of Kliiang-Si. — Scientific Labours and Celebrity of Father Ricci in that City. — His Rela- tions with the Viceroy. — The Mission of Tchao-Tcheou besieged by the Bonzes. — Tranquillity restored. — Father Ricci named Superior of all the Missions of China. — Father Ricci sets off for Pekin with the Pi'esident of the Supreme Court. — Agitation in the City of Nankin. — Imperial Canal. — The Yellow River. — Arrival at Pekin. — The Missionaries deceived. — Forced to quit Pekin. — Sufferings on their Return. — Beautiful Chinese Town. — Fetes of the New Year. — Father Ricci's Dream. — Preaching on Mathematics and the Sciences. — Observatory of Nankin. — Chinese Explanation of Eclipses. — Literary Solemnity. — Philosophical Discussion. — Palace haunted by evil Spirits - - Page 92 CHAP. IV. Mode of Instruction adopted by Father Ricci Zeal of the Portu- guese for the Missions. — Father Ricci sets out for Pekin. — Influence of Eunuchs in the Government. — Journey from Nankin to Pekin. — The Eunuch Ma-Tang. — The Missionaries taken Prisoners at a Sea-port. — Arrival of Ricci at Pekin. — The Court of Rites. — Rivalry between the Mandarins and Eunuchs. — Palace of the Ambassadors. — Homage to the Son of Heaven. — Various Petitions to the Emperor. — Relations between the Missionaries and Magistrates. — Conversion of a Member of the Academy of Han-Lin. — Great Success of the Clocks at Court. — Missions of the Provinces. — Fraternal Feeling among the Christians of China. — Chinese Superstitions. — Procession in Honour of the Idol of the Eyes. — The Missionaries mimicked by the Mountebanks. — Success of the Christian Preaching. — Profession of Faith of a Christian. — Native Clergy. — Academy of Han- Lin. — Conversion in the Imperial Family. — Insurrection of the Chinese of Macao. — Father Cataneo accused of seeking to get himself pi'oclaimed Emperor. — Formidable Armament at Canton Martyrdom of a Chinese Seminarist. — Peace is restored - - - 141 CHAP. V. Cathay and China. — Father Goes travels by Land from India to Pekin. — Cowardice of the Indian Soldiers. — The Robbers of the==-? THE SECOND VOLUME. Vll Desert. — Battle between the Caravan and the Tartar Robbers Difficulties of the Journey. — Town of Yarkand. — Jade Stone. — Goes visits the Jade Quarries. — The Mussulmen of Yarkand endeavour to assassinate iiim. — Encounter of two Caravans in th<'. Middle of the Steppe. — News of the Fekin Mission. — Goe'.s courageous Profession of Faith.— Journey through the Steppes. — Desert of Gobi. — Arrival at the Frontiers of China. — The Great "VVall, — Combination among the Merchants to deceive the p^mperor. — Father Goes fails to reach Pekin. — He writes to Father Ricci. — He is sent for. — Death of Father Goes. — His Companion arrives at Pekin, and then returns to the Indies. — Death of Father Soerius. — Peculiarity of the Chinese Letters. — octor Paul. — Mission of Schang-Hai. — The Influence and Labours of Father Ricci.— Death of Matthew Ricci. — His Funeral. • — Grant of a Piece of Land for his Tomb. — Opposition of the Bonzes. — Virtues of Father Ricci - - - Page 18G CHAP. VI. Question of Rites. — The two Schools. — Consequences of these Discussions. — Important Conversions among the educated Classes. — Doctors Leon and Michel. — Mission of Han-Tcheou-Fou. — Violent Persecution. — Memorial against the Christians. — Apologies frojn the Christian Doctors. — Edict against Christianity. — Courage of the Neophytes. — Poisoning, Flagellation, and Torture Death of two Neophytes. — The JNlissionaries shut up in Cages. — New Establishment. — The old Missions to Tartary and Thibet. — Father D'Andrada sets out for Thibet in 1624. — Mountains. — Avalanches. — Pagoda of Badid. — Fables of the Lamas. — Halt in the Valley of Mana. — The King of Sirinagar endeavours to arrest D'Andrada. — Terrible Journey of DAndrada. — Immense Glaciers. — D'Andrada returns. — Reunion of the Caravan. — Arrival in Tiiibet. — The King of Caparangua. — Decree in Favour of the Missionaries. — D'Andrada sets out lor the Indies. — Return to Thibet. — Accounts of the Thibetans. — The King desires to turn Christian. — Opposition of the Lamas. — Religious Discussions. — Scarcity of Information relating to this Mission. — Conjectures of the Tartar Historians - - *• . - . 22G CHAP. VIL Revulutionary Character of the Chinese. — Secret Societies. — Insurrection of the Sect of the White Lily. — Edict against Secret Societies. — Persecution of Christians. — Memorial in their Favour. — Fall of the First Minister Doctor Paul. — The Mantchoo Tartars attack the Empire. — Their Chief swears to exterminate the Dynasty of Ming. — First Successes of the Tartars. — Death of the P^mperor Wang-Lie. — Curious Petition of the Christians Jesuits summoned to Pekin to make Cannon. — Discovery of the Vlll CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME. Monument of Si-Ngan-Fou. — Testimony of Father Semedo. — Pro- gress of Conversions. — Sincere Piety of the Neophytes. — Admirable Conduct of a Christian Generah — Death of Dr. Leon. — Biogra- piiical Details concerning that illustrious Christian. — Dr. Paul First Minister.' — He favours the Christians. — Commissions the Jesuits to reform the Calendar. — Fathers Schall and Rho arrive at Pekin, — They are placed at the Head of the Board of Celestial Literature. — Death of Dr. Paul — Abject Condition of his Descendants Page 272 CHAP. VIIL Father Schall fabricates a Harpsichord for the Emperor. — Christianity in the Imperial Harem. — The Tartars summoned to the Assistance of the Empire. — Father Schall establishes a Cannon Foundery Gratitude of the Emperor. — Progress of the Insun-ection Ly- Kong the Chief of the Rebels. — He attacks Pekin. — Tragic Death of the Emperor. — Character of this Pi'ince. — The Insurgents at Pekin. — Adam Schall before the revolutionary Tribunal. — First Act of the Government of Ly-Kong. — Submission of the Lettered and the Magistrates. — Heroism of General Ou-San Koui and his Fatner. — Ou-San Koui swears to exterminate Ly-Kong. — He invokes the Tartars. — Rout of the Insurgents. — Terrible Conflagration at Pekin. — The Catholic Mission is saved. — The Mantchoos Masters of the Capital. — Character of their Policy. — Memorial of Father Schall. — He is appointed President of the Board of Mathematics. — The Government Astronomers. — The JMantchoos favour the Missionaries. — Father Martini and a Tartar Cliief. — The Tyrant Tchang-Kien ravages and depopulates Sse- Tcliouen. — Adventures of Fathers Buglio and Magalhans. — Father Schall at Pekin - - - - - 312 CHAP. IX. Legend respecting the Origin of the Mantchoo Tartars. — Father Schall and the King of the Coreans. — Rash Enterprise of the Regent of the Empire. — Ama-AVang listens to the Advice of Father Schall. — Influence of that celebrated Missionary. — The Claimants of the ancient Dynasty. — Their Friendliness to Christianity. — Dissensions among the Chinese Claimants. — They are Destroyed by Ama-Wang. — Death of that illustrious Tartar. — Majority of the young Emperor. — Application of Father Schall. — His Advice to the Emperor. — Intimacy between Father Schall and the Emperor. — Chun-Tche loves and favours Christianity. — Pro- gress of the Missionaries. — Construction of a beautiful Churcii at Pekin. — Zeal of the Christians. — Religious Associations. — Titles conferred by tlie Emperor on Father Schall and his Ancestors. — Sickness of Cliun-Tche. — Exhortations of Father Schall. — Death

of the Emperor. — His Funeral - - - - 351