Index:Face to Face With the Mexicans.djvu

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Transclusion_Status_Detection_Tool Library-logo-blue-outline.png View-refresh.svg

Face to Face With the Mexicans.djvu

Pages   (key to Page Status)   

Cover - - - - - 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043 044 045 046 047 048 049 050 051 052 053 054 055 056 057 058 059 060 061 062 063 064 065 066 067 068 069 070 071 072 073 074 075 076 077 078 079 080 081 082 083 084 085 086 087 088 089 090 091 092 093 094 095 096 097 098 099 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582 583 584 Advert Advert Advert Advert - - - - - Cover

Validated index page

CONTENTS.


 

 

A NEW HOME AND NEW FRIENDS.

Tradition and founding of Saltillo—Origin and derivation of the name—Opinions vary—Coahuila—Origin of the name—Saltillo, the seat of important industries—Making a new home—Beautiful scenery—Calle Real, the historic seat—Architecture—Home in an old Mexican mansion—Doors, roof, windows, floors, keys—Adobe roofs—Water spouts—Relics of Mexican grandeur—Absence of modern conveniences—Fears of ghosts and hobgoblins—A nocturnal adventure—Interesting discoveries—Visit from a Mexican youth—Scenes from my window

………….33


IN MOTHER NOAH'S SHOES.

Primitive housekeeping—The indispensable mozo—Extraordinary culinary arrangements—The metate or mill—Pancho's wit and intelligence—Daily revelations. Wrestling with a foreign tongue—Primitive practices—Going to market—Mexican articles of food—Street scenes—A familiar face in a strange land—The burros—Retail venders—A cooking-stove—The disgust of the natives—The stove's oration.

………….60


NO ES COSTUMBRE.

The lack of a broom—A friend in need—The escobero, broom-vender—House-cleaning—Astonishing the natives—Pancho's amiability gives out—He leaves me for his "sick grandmother"'—Pancho's successors—Courteous insubordination—Greek meets Greek—Pancho's successors depart—Peculiar names and characteristics of servants—"Little John"—Wifely devotion—Marital tyranny—An undressed fowl—Knotty points

…………84


THE LOAN OF A MOZO AND A TRIP TO PALOMAS.

Successive departures of successive mozos—Cosme, our borrowed mozo—We set out for Palomas—Cosme in the van—His John Gilpin ride Palomas—A typical Mexican home—A surgical operation—Inquisitive hospitality—Inherent courtesy—A Mexican dinner—Embroidery and fancy work—The "Pass of the Doves"—Our ride home—Poor Cosme!—He takes a mournful departure—His pious adios

………….102


FROM BORDER TO CAPITAL ALONG THE MEXICAN CENTRAL.

The Mexican "All aboard!"—El Paso and Paso del Norte—Chihuahua—Santa Rosalia, its manners and customs—Dr. Tarver and family—Strange notices in a meson—Stations and scenery along the road—Zacatecas—Mines and mining—Aguas Calientes—Historic associations—National Palace—Public bathing of the common people—Bridge at Encarnacion—Queretaro—Maximilian's monument—Other towns along the road—Memorial crosses and stone-heaps—Nochistongo Pass—Arrival at Mexico City—Hotel San Carlos—The all-important camarista

………….127


TENOCHTITLAN—THE AZTEC CAPITAL.

The founding of the city—Invasion by the Spaniards—The three great causeways—The Spaniards' defeat—"Noche triste"—Atzcapotzalco—Mexico City—The Zocalo—Street—"Street of the Sad Indian"—Street cars—Pulque shops—Inundations and earthquakes—The Rome of America—Churches—Monuments—Industrial art and public schools—Public gardens—Markets—Charitable institutions—Pawn-shops—Theaters—Dry-goods stores—House-renting—Mexican flora—Art gallery and museum—The Viga Canal—Chapultepec—Climate—The Alameda—Funerals—Valley of Mexico—Popocatapetl—Iztaccihuatl

………….155


THE MEXICANS IN THEIR HOMES.

Characteristics—Sincerity and faithfulness in friendship—Hospitality—How to meet them—Manners and customs—Middle class—Forms of greeting—Etiquette—Gesticulations—Family ties—Their charity and benevolence—Religion—Hospitality—Household rrangements—The Palacio mansion—Music—Poetry—Manners ofspeech—Courtesy—Pollas and pollitasGallos and gallinos—Domestic tastes of the women—Their beauty, their education and accomplishments—The children—Their beauty and precocity—Little Alfonso—Boys and girls—Home discipline—Courtesy to elders.—The dear babies

...198


FASTS AND FESTIVALS AND SOCIAL FORMS.

Harmony of the subjects—Change from Paganism to Christianity—Power of the Roman Catholic Church—Rupture of Church and State—All Saints' Day—All Souls' Day—Feast of the Virgin of Guadalupe—Weird sights and sounds—Celebration of a dia de santa—Celebrations at Morelia and Queretaro—Christmas—PosadasPiñates—Festivities—La China Poblana—Pastorela in the rural districts—Feasts of the Epiphany, Candlemas, etc.—Carnival—Lent—Palm Sunday—Holy Week—Good Friday—Sabado de Gloria (Saturday of Glory)—Floral festival—Feast of St. John the Baptist—Funeral notices—Wearing of mourning—National feasts—Courtship and marriages—Cards: wedding, birth, and baptismal—Social ceremonies—Dress—The gorgeous hacendado—Gallantries—The danza— Outdoor amusements—Chapultepec military academy.

…242


FROM MEXICO TO MORELIA ALONG THE MEXICAN NATIONAL.

A delightful journey—Charming views—Toluca—Institute Literario—Public school—Hacienda de la Huerta—Distinguished hospitalities—Touching street scenes—From Toluca to Morelia—Tepeji del Rio—Reminders of Ocampo's tragic death—Hotel de Michoacan—Characteristic hotel regulations—Rambles among the convents—A startling apparition—A unique bachelor establishment—Climate—Minerals—Fruits—Scenery—Peculiar lacquer ware—College of San Nicolas—Prisons and penitentiaries—Architecture—Visit to the Legislature—Morelian hospitality—Tribute from Mary Halleck Foote—Adios to Morelia.

….293


ACTORS AND EVENTS IN MEXICAN HISTORY.

Mexico's struggles for independence—Hidalgo, the Washington of Mexico—Midnight scene and grito of Dolores—Stirring events and closing scenes in the life of the patriot—His execution—Morelos, the successor of Hidalgo—Joined by Matamoras—Siege of Cuantla—Defeat and execution—His house in Morelia—The Emperor Augustin de Iturbide—The mysterious portrait—Iturbide's brilliant record—Honorsshown him—Abdication and exile—Return and capture—Execution—The grandson of the Emperor adopted by Maxmilian and Carlotta—The mother regains possession of her son—Madame Iturbide—Vicente Guerrero—Guerrilla warfare—Capture and execution—The Bravos, father and son—Magnanimous conduct of Nicolas Bravo—Guadalupe Victoria, first President of Mexico—General Santa Anna—His wonderful career—Exile, return and death—Promulgation of the Federal Chart—Benito Juarez, the Indian President—Tomb of Juarez—His glorious career—Don Melchor Ocampo—His tragic end—Distinguished patriots—Bancroft's criticisms on the American war—Helen Hunt Jackson—Intermarriages of Americans and Mexicans—Causes of the Mexican war—Congress—Madam Diaz and Mrs. Cleveland—General Diaz—Sketch of his life and adventures.

...315


A GLANCE AT MEXICAN LITERATURE.

Primitive literature—The twelve Franciscan friars, the pioneers of Mexican literature—Toribio Benavente—Bernardino de Sahagún—Las Casas and other early writers—Literary Association—General Palacio as a writer—Literary entertainment at his mansion—Altamirano—Guillermo Prieto—Juan de Dios Peza, the "Mexican Longfellow"—Francisco Sosa—Members of the literati—Mexican journalism—The Liceo Morelos—Mexican Press Association—Women writers—"Maraposa Indiana"—A pleasing token.

….374


MORE ABOUT THE COMMON PEOPLE.

"The Silent Aztec Child of the Sun"—Poetical contribution by Joaquin Miller—Contrast between the Mexican and American Indian—Ingenuity of the former—Contentment of the laboring class—Clothing—Fine needlework—Advancement in education—Types—Courtesy among the poor—Their love of music—The lepero—The China Poblana—Making a portrait under difficulties—Social life and courtship—Marriage ceremonies—Bridal costumes—Street conversation—Mexican mole—Servant—Their devotion to their employers—Wages—Novel methods of keeping accounts Hospitality among the poor—Sewing-machines—Babies—Beauty of the juveniles—The evangelista (letter writer)—Annoying peddlers—An ingenious trick—Various avocations—Characteristic conversation—The lavanderas—The aguador, or water-carrier—Ancient superstitious beliefs—Modern superstitions—The tamalera—The curandera, or doctor—"I became a doctor by my natural intelligence"—Pharmacy extraordinary

….395


PUEBLA, CHOLULA, SAN MIGUEL SESMA AND ORIZABA ALONG THE MEXICAN RAILWAY.

Starting for Puebla—San Juan Teotihuacan, the Mexican Pompeii—Arrival at the Casa de las Diligencias—The imperturbable camarista—Puebla—Public buildings—Maternity hospital—Manufactories—"City of the Angels"—Cathedral—Market scenes—Picturesque costumes—Importance and resources of the State of Puebla—Pyramid of Cholula—Pyramids of Xochicalco and Papantla—Beautiful scenery—Incidental kindnesses—Visit to Madam Iturbide's hacienda—Morning song of the peons—A model plantation—Ancient aqueduct—On the road—Places of interest—Storm at Orizaba.

….441


THE VIRGIN OF GUADALUPE.

The tradition—Universal and firm belief in it—How the Virgin appeared to Juan Diego—Her command to build a chapel—Miraculous signs and visions—Building of the Church

….473


AMONG THE CHILDREN.

The story of Gaitagileno—Lullabies, rhymes and nursery tales—Conundrums and games—"El pato"

...476


SCENES FROM MY WINDOW.

Picturesque pedestrians—The gorgeous serape—Novel method of taking home the wash—Venders of various articles—Entertaining panorama—Teatro Principal—Military review—An amusing diversion—A runaway—A perplexed butter-boy—Gritos—The tamalera—Touching incident—Song of the "costumbres"—Newsboys' cries

...485


WHAT THEY EAT AND HOW THEY COOK IT.

Skill of the ancient Aztecs in the culinary art—Primitive kitchens—A unique water filter—Ceremonious table observances—Delicious beverages—Recipes for toothsome dishes

...494


THE AMERICAN COLONY.

"Mother of the American Colony"—Our little band in the sister republic—The American Benevolent Society—Hospital—Protestant churches—Bishop Riley—His labors and sacrifices—Celebration of Christmas among the Americans—Agreeable impressions left by our official representatives—General Henry R. Jackson—Simon Lara, founder of the American Hospital—Laying of the corner-stone—Eloquent speech by Gen. Jackson—Token of esteem to the General from the colony—His departure from Mexico and his farewell speech.

….505


A FEW OF THE POPULAR SONGS AND DANCES OF THE PEOPLE.

The National Anthem—The Danza known as Las Tres Gracias (Three Graces): 1. Aglas; 2. Talia; 3. Eufrasina—La Golondrina, the Mexican "Home, Sweet Home"—Los Naranjos ó Adela—I Ay Que Niquel!—La Paloma.

….519


ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES.

Mutual dependence of the two republics—Causes of misunderstandings—Yankee haste versus Mexican slowness—Steps towards a better understanding—Mexico's wonderful resources—Tact of foreigners in business dealings—John Bull conforming to the "costumbres"—Success in retail trade—Extremes of wealth and poverty—Irrigation—Haciendas—Employees' accounts—Peons—Their intense conservatism—Work retarded by holidays—Mr. Guernsey on foreign labor—Taxes on produce—American miners—Variety of delicious fruits—The maguey plant—Manufacture of pulque, etc.—Tanneries—Shoes—Cattle-breeding—Butter: Its novel manufacture—Minor industries—Transformation of plebeian names—Domestication of American families in Mexico—Education—Naturalization laws—Climate—Police regulations—"Rurales"—Their bravery in rescuing the crew of the "Ranger"—Rewarded by President Cleveland—Judge Crosby on American enterprise and investments in Mexico—Ladies traveling in the Republic—Causes of Mexico's troubles—Her steady progression—Border troubles—The dawn of a new era.

...538