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Index:The Conquest of Mexico Volume 2.djvu

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The Conquest of Mexico Volume 2.djvu

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CONTENTS
BOOK IV — Continued
RESIDENCE IN MÉXICO
chap page
V. Montezuma swears allegiance to Spain — Royal Treasures — Their Division — Christian Worship in the Teocalli — Discontents or the Aztecs 3
VI. Fate of Cortes' Emissaries — Proceedings in the Castilian Court — Preparations of Velazquez — Narvaez lands in Mexico — Politic Conduct of Cortés — He leaves de Capital 15
VII. Cortes descends from the Tableland — Negotiations with Narvaez — Prepares to Assault him — Quarters of Narvaez — Attack by Night — Narvaez Defeated 28
VIII. Discontent of the Troops — Insurrection in the Capital — Return of Cortés — General Signs of Hostility — Massacre by Alvarado — Rising of the Aztecs 43
BOOK V
EXPULSION FROM MEXICO
I. Desperate Assault on the Quarters — Fury of the Mexicans — Sally of the Spaniards — Montezuma addresses the People — Dangerously Wounded 65
II. Storming of the Great Temple — Spirit of the Aztecs — Distresses of the Garrison — Sharp Combats in the City — Death of Montezuma 83
III. Council of War — Spaniards evacuate the City — Noche Triste, or the "'Melancholy Night" — Terrible Slaughter — Halt for the Night — Amount of Losses 101
IV. Retreat of the Spaniards — Distresses of the Army — Pyramids of Teotihuacan — Great Battle of Otumba 117
V. Arrival in Tlascala — Friendly Reception — Discontents of the Army — Jealousy of the Tlascalans — Embassy from Mexico 129
VI. War with the surrounding Tribes — Successes of the Spaniards — Death of Maxixca — Arrival of Reinforcements — Return in Triumph to Tlascala 142
VII. Guatemozin Emperor of the Aztecs — Preparations for the March — Military Code — Spaniards cross the Sierra — Enter Tezcuco — Prince Ixtlilxochitl 155
BOOK VI
SIEGE AND SURRENDER OF MEXICO
I. Arrangements at Tezcuco — Sack of Iztapalapan — Advantages of the Spaniards — Wise Policy of Cortés — Transportation of the Brigantines 177
II. Cortés reconnoitres the Capital — Occupies Tacuba — Skirmishes with the Enemy — Expedition or Sandoval — Arrival of Reinforcements 190
III. Second Reconnoitring Expedition — Engagements on the Sierra — Capture of Cuernavaca — Battles at Xochimilco — Narrow Escape of Cortés — He enters Tacuba 202
IV. Conspiracy in the Army — Brigantines Launched — Muster of Forces — Execution of Xicotencatl — March of the Army — Beginning of the Siege 218
V. Indian Flotilla defeated — Occupation of the Causeways — Desperate Assaults — Firing of the Palaces — Spirit of the Besieged — Barracks for the Troops 231
VI. General Assault on the City — Defeat of the Spaniards — Their disastrous Condition — Sacrifice of the Captives — Defection of the Allies — Constancy of the Troops 250
VII. Success of the Spaniards — Fruitless Offers to Guatemozin — Buildings razed to the Ground — Terrible Famine — The Troops gain the Market-place — Battering Engine 265
VIII. Dreadful Sufferings of the Besieged — Spirit of Guatemozin — Murderous Assaults — Capture of Guatemozin — Evacuation of the City — Termination of the Siege — Reflections 278
BOOK VII
CONCLUSION — SUBSEQUENT CAREER OF CORTES
I. Torture of Guatemozin — Submission of the Country — Rebuilding of the Capital — Mission to Castile — Complaints against Cortés — He is confirmed in his Authority 309
II. Modern Mexico — Settlement of the Country — Condition of the Natives — Christian Missionaries — Cultivation of the Soil — Voyages and Expeditions 322
III. Defection of Olid — Dreadful March to Honduras — Execution of Guatemozin — Dona Marina — Arrival at Honduras 332
IV. Disturbances in Mexico — Return of Cortés — Distrust of the Court — Cortés returns to Spain — Death of Sandoval — Brilliant reception of Cortés — Honours conferred on him 346
V. Cortés revisits Mexico — Retires to his Estates — His Voyages of Discovery — Final Return to Castile — Cold Reception — Death of Cortés — His Character 360
Appendix 381
Notes to Vol. II. 413
Index 1 471
Index 2 479
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
page
4. A raven croaking. See Vol. I. p. 98.
5. Abdication of the Emperor Montezuma. See the Codex Vaticanus A, p. 82 (Kingsborough).
6. The Spaniards gazed with greedy eyes. See the Codex Tepetlaoztoc, the vase in the Bristol Museum, a small recently found quauhxicalli, a snake-|headed censer and a stone monkey's head in the Mexico Museum, a bowl with a head between the jaws of the earth-monster in the British Museum, and bowls figured in Seler's Gesammelte Abhandlungen, pp. 290, 328, as well as Diaz, Maudslay, Vol. I. p. 144.
12. Short-eared owl (Asia accipitrinus), an evil omen as being the bird of the god of death, Mictlantecutli. See Vol. I. p. 213.
46. Priests making new fire in preparation for war. See the Codex Zouche, p. 78.
55. The brow of Cortés darkened as he said to Alvarado, "Your conduct has been that of a madman."
57. The Prince Cuitlahua, Montezuma's brother, accepted the post of honour and danger.
70. The priests with frantic gestures animating them to avenge their insulted deities. On the left is a priest of Huitzilopotchli, with an effigy of Painal on his back. On the right a priest of Mixcoatl. The central figure may, perhaps, be a priest of Tezcatlipoca. See Sahagun and Mexican archæology, Joyce, Ch. II.
73. Cortés dashed to the assistance of his secretary. The Anonymous Conqueror on p. 23 tells of horses being killed by maquahuitl blows on the head and breast. Such statements, supported by the Codices Telleriano-Remensis, Vaticanus A, Baranda, and the Lienzo di Tlaxcala, prove that horses were by no means always armour-plated.
75. The Aztecs nearly succeeded in scaling the walls.
76. "Why do I see my people here in arms against the palace of my fathers?" The Emperor has donned the tlacaeuatl, the tragic sacrificial vesture of the god Xipe. He is crowned with the turquoise xiuitzontli. See the Codex Cozcatzin, p. 14, and Seler, Gesammelte Abhandlungen, p. 401.
78. The swollen tide of their passions swept away all the barriers of ancient reverence.
87. Fighting for possession of the temple.
95. Death of the Emperor Montezuma.
99. Funeral of the Emperor Montezuma. See the Codices Féjerváry-Mayer, p. 40, and Magliabecchiano, p. 62.
102. Cortes called a council of his officers.
110. The "Noche Triste."
130. Maxixca. See Ixtlilxochitl, p. 207, who speaks of Maxixca as a young, not an old man. In the Lienzo di Tlaxcala (p. 28) he has none of the wrinkles with which in post-conquest drawings old people are usually marked.
136. They pledged themselves to stand by Cortes.
138. On Montezuma's death his brother Cuitlahua succeeded him. See the figure with outstretched arms on the large pottery incense brazier in the British Museum.
157. The Prince Guatemozin crowned Emperor on the death of his Uncle, Cuitlahua. On his left arm is a new maconcatl (see the Codex Duran, p. 18, and Mexican Archaeology, Joyce, p. 1 1 3). At the time of his coronation, Guatemozin was, according to Ixtlilxochitl (p. 262), eighteen years old; Diaz (Maudslay, Vol. IV. p. 184) says twenty-one. His name (more properly, Quauhtemotzin), means Swooping Eagle. "Tzin" at the end of a name indicates "Lord," as Maxixcatzin, Cuitlahuatzin, Cacamatzin.
168. The Prince Ixtlilxochitl. The name means Black Flower.
180. They fought up to their girdles in water.
222. Cortes tore the scroll in pieces.
244. The Emperor Guatemozin frequently selected the hours of darkness. For Guatemozin's eagle uniform see the Codices Zouche, p. 12; and Vienna, p. 4 (Kingsborough); and Mexican Archaeology, Joyce, p. 123.
254. Suddenly the horn of the Emperor Guatemozin, the sacred symbol, heard only in seasons of extraordinary peril, sent forth a long and piercing note.
261. Prisoners for sacrifice had their faces painted, their heads crowned with plumes, and their bodies decorated with tufts of down.
286. This work of butchery.
290. Surrender of the Emperor Guatemozin. He is handing over the Imperial standard of Tenochtitlan, broken.
294. Celebrating the end of their long and laborious campaign.
311. The torturing of the Emperor Guatemozin.
338. Execution of the Emperor Guatemozin. Seler's theory that Guatemozin was hung head downwards is discountenanced by Mr. Joyce, who has weighty evidence against it.
467. Sacrificial Knife. In the British Museum.